Novak Djokovic -- heart of a champion (?) [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Novak Djokovic -- heart of a champion (?)

Henry Kaspar
01-29-2009, 05:42 PM
Now this is an attempt to have a serious discussion about Djokovic's prospects. Decide for yourself whether this is for you. Besides, I know you are all cool and tough and know plentiful swearwords; not need to prove it here.

When Djokovic burst on the scene a couple of years ago I was impressed. Here was a skinny kid with a "can-do" attitude who seemed not in awe of Federer and Nadal. Who wasn't resigned to playing second fiddle and being an also-ran. Who wore his confidence on his sleeves which made him seem a bit cocky, but so what. Also, while his game had neither Federer's elegance nor Nadal's physical intensity, he could play almost every strike in the book, and his groundstrokes had a precision and aggresiveness that took his opponents constantly out of their comfort zones. His versatility allowed him to play smart, adjust tactics in the middle of a match. When he won the Australian Open last year -- following a lost US Open final that owed more to nerves than the superiority of his opponent -- I reckoned this kid could become really great.

One year later, Djokovic is still one of the most dangerous players on the tour, but clearly his status isn't the same. His cockiness and confidence are still there, but instead of aiming at surpassing the top dogs with consitently outstanding performances -- the only way to do it -- he seems to be content to beat them every now and then and otherwise be the #3 player of the world (this is what seems to matter to him -- he got quite upset when it was suggested there may be a "big 4" now).

Maybe this is in recognition that he isn't far enough yet to serially produce the needed results, but it also seems an attitude thing. Most disturbing is his tendency to throw matches. It's one thing to retire every now and then, another to make a habit of it and call it quits because of discomfort or minor injuries. Compare this to Federer, who played through the 2008 Australian Open with mononucelosis (if you ever had mono yourself and experienced the all-numbing fatigue that comes with it, you'll appreciate the effort), or to Nadal, who's suffering from chronic tendinitis in his knees and for whom every hard court tournament must be an ordeal. It also seems that there is a self-destructive trait in Djokovic to make fuss about himself, act like a diva (not unlike his compatriot, Ms. Jankovic), which detracts him from doing this job.

If he goes on like this, Djokovic will fail to exploit his potential. I guess at some point he will need to take a step back and think through with a sober mind what he wants to achieve in the game. Maybe a little maturing is all he needs. But for now it looks as if his path to greatness would be at least be delayed.

JolánGagó
01-29-2009, 05:59 PM
He was quite hopeful last year when on the verge of surpassing Nadal and fought for it. Not likely he's now happy with a N.3. Must be some kind of mental slump, he needs to get his shit together and feet on the ground and then we'll see.

maki925
01-29-2009, 05:59 PM
You never know what future can bring,things and circumstances are changeable.Luck also turns from one player to an another.
Nole reached the top so quickly.He was chosen as the player who has most improved two times, for the year 2006. and 2007. and it should tell something and gives hope!:)

Andi-M
01-29-2009, 06:10 PM
I used to really like the kid when he came on the scene for the reasons you said really he seemed amibitous, confident and presented a genuine challenge to the top 2.

I don't know whats happened but IMO mentaly he's fallen apart. He cant seem to deal with pressure dosen't look like he's enjoying his game right now.

His attitude is growing ever increasingly pathetic crowds are turning againgst him and unless he changes soon he's on track to becoming one of the most hated players of all time.

maki925
01-29-2009, 06:21 PM
^c'mon,that's far too harsh!:(

Dini
01-29-2009, 08:54 PM
Harsh but true sadly.

biological
01-29-2009, 08:57 PM
I think he can still do very well. I hope so anyway, because I think he has the talent for it. I enjoy watching him play, I think he just needs to become a bit stronger mentally.

aeronatasha
01-29-2009, 09:08 PM
I think he's just going through a bit of a slump, needs to get it together in his head. Easier said than done.

He always wanted to fight for it, that's why I like the kid. He just wouldn't back down.

He's smart, and even if I'm disappointed (truly) with the way he handled a few situations, I think he'll deal with it. Only takes time. I can't imagine what it must be like at 21, with so much pressure and expectations. (Now that speaks volumes for Nadal).

Hell, 2008 was his best year so far, a year many players could only wish for, and he's getting trashed because he didn't do even more.

And by the way, 'one of the most hated players ever'? Please. That's utter nonsense. What is said on MTF doesn't relate to real life, which may come as shock to some.

PiggyGotRoasted
01-29-2009, 09:16 PM
who knows, he could go onto win the other 3 grand slams yet and equal federers best year ever.

Vida
01-29-2009, 09:57 PM
...Most disturbing is his tendency to throw matches. It's one thing to retire every now and then, another to make a habit of it and call it quits because of discomfort or minor injuries....

To me looks like an immunity problem that he has, wouldn't call those "a minor injury".

...Compare this to Federer, who played through the 2008 Australian Open with mononucelosis (if you ever had mono yourself and experienced the all-numbing fatigue that comes with it, you'll appreciate the effort)...

People with mono cant move for years, while people who ate bad chicken simply shit a river and move on.

Just a thought.

The Pro
01-29-2009, 10:11 PM
Nole's problem is that he is a brat with no character.

MacTheKnife
01-29-2009, 10:37 PM
He is as technically sound as anybody out there. But mentally he has begun to collapse as he closed in on the top two. He also appears to have let success go to his head. He does not appear to be willing to pay the price of the off court work to get himself physically fit enough to compete consistently at the highest level.
My coach used to talk about how do you play under the "threat of victory". He was talking about in matches, but I see that with careers too. Some guys work towards a goal so long, that when they finally get close, they just can't deal with the mental aspects of success. You see it in matches all the time. Guys play great with no pressure, then when they put themselves in a position to win the match, then just can't close it out under the "threat of victory".

petar_pan
01-29-2009, 10:56 PM
he is great player,but i don't know what i can say about his head.we will see what will be.but if he want to somebody love him he must stop with faking.

PiggyGotRoasted
01-29-2009, 11:06 PM
He will be number 1, in 2011 when federer retires and before the new dominant player comes.

fast_clay
01-29-2009, 11:07 PM
debilitating form of it... ancic's would more resemble a proper bout of it... i know... running a minute or two = a couple of 7-6'ers... i know it from experience...

but... this thread is not about that old chestnut...

what we have here is a player unable to fall on his sword when things dont go his way... i wish andy would have just called a spade a spade... and i am sure he did off camera... cos... it just seems to me that everyone else out there in the spotlight can happily go down, walk off the court and say... 'ok - today - i wasnt good enough'...

it robs people of there ticket value...

when you are a professional tennis player, it means you are not a junior... not saying this is how novak carries himself every match... though... for 8 weeks of the year, tennis holds the worlds attention... and... novak is building a special history inside those 8 weeks alone...

petar_pan
01-29-2009, 11:23 PM
debilitating form of it... ancic's would more resemble a proper bout of it... i know... running a minute or two = a couple of 7-6'ers... i know it from experience...

but... this thread is not about that old chestnut...

what we have here is a player unable to fall on his sword when things dont go his way... i wish andy would have just called a spade a spade... and i am sure he did off camera... cos... it just seems to me that everyone else out there in the spotlight can happily go down, walk off the court and say... 'ok - today - i wasnt good enough'...

it robs people of there ticket value...

when you are a professional tennis player, it means you are not a junior... not saying this is how novak carries himself every match... though... for 8 weeks of the year, tennis holds the worlds attention... and... novak is building a special history inside those 8 weeks alone...


ancic has something what you can't buy-heart.he never quits,he won match against blake after 1:5 in 3rd set(he won 7:5)in may 2006.he is the biggest fighter on tour.djokovic is a biggest quiter in last 15 years.funs loves the most when somebody has a heart,nobody loves fakers.

BalkanBoy
01-30-2009, 01:52 AM
Novak has the heart of a champion unfortunately not the physique.

Aloimeh
01-30-2009, 02:01 AM
Now this is an attempt to have a serious discussion about Djokovic's prospects. Decide for yourself whether this is for you. Besides, I know you are all cool and tough and know plentiful swearwords; not need to prove it here.

When Djokovic burst on the scene a couple of years ago I was impressed. Here was a skinny kid with a "can-do" attitude who seemed not in awe of Federer and Nadal. Who wasn't resigned to playing second fiddle and being an also-ran. Who wore his confidence on his sleeves which made him seem a bit cocky, but so what. Also, while his game had neither Federer's elegance nor Nadal's physical intensity, he could play almost every strike in the book, and his groundstrokes had a precision and aggresiveness that took his opponents constantly out of their comfort zones. His versatility allowed him to play smart, adjust tactics in the middle of a match. When he won the Australian Open last year -- following a lost US Open final that owed more to nerves than the superiority of his opponent -- I reckoned this kid could become really great.

One year later, Djokovic is still one of the most dangerous players on the tour, but clearly his status isn't the same. His cockiness and confidence are still there, but instead of aiming at surpassing the top dogs with consitently outstanding performances -- the only way to do it -- he seems to be content to beat them every now and then and otherwise be the #3 player of the world (this is what seems to matter to him -- he got quite upset when it was suggested there may be a "big 4" now).

Maybe this is in recognition that he isn't far enough yet to serially produce the needed results, but it also seems an attitude thing. Most disturbing is his tendency to throw matches. It's one thing to retire every now and then, another to make a habit of it and call it quits because of discomfort or minor injuries. Compare this to Federer, who played through the 2008 Australian Open with mononucelosis (if you ever had mono yourself and experienced the all-numbing fatigue that comes with it, you'll appreciate the effort), or to Nadal, who's suffering from chronic tendinitis in his knees and for whom every hard court tournament must be an ordeal. It also seems that there is a self-destructive trait in Djokovic to make fuss about himself, act like a diva (not unlike his compatriot, Ms. Jankovic), which detracts him from doing this job.

If he goes on like this, Djokovic will fail to exploit his potential. I guess at some point he will need to take a step back and think through with a sober mind what he wants to achieve in the game. Maybe a little maturing is all he needs. But for now it looks as if his path to greatness would be at least be delayed.

Novak's root problem is arrogance. It's what wins him matches. It's also what is currently his downfall. If he wants to succeed and become Federer's hardcourt heir, he must do several things:

1.) Fire the coach. A responsible coach would have told him to never ever quit again after that humiliating Monte Carlo debacle. Sore throat is the biggest joke ever. The blister and the asthma and the flu and even the most recent retirement were a bit more understandable - but Monte Carlo wasn't. Why hasn't the coach dealt with the problem? Probably because he fears losing his job. Such a coach is, therefore, placing his own interests above those of his trainee, and therefore cannot be trusted to give what is necessarily the best advice. However, Vajda is shortsighted, in that he will lose his job if Novak continues to flounder - it'll happen later, perhaps, than if he criticized him, but it'll happen nonetheless.

2.) Stop going in with the attitude of "all the time in the world." Federer's longevity remains an unknown. He clearly didn't "die" and Nadal is improving. Novak is young but he doesn't know what the younger generation might produce and he should always go into slams with the attitude of it being the last he has a good chance of winning. He really needs to apply more pressure in that direction. He's much too nonchalant about it.

3.) Forget about No. 2 and No. 1. They will come naturally when he starts winning slams.

4.) Focus on fitness. Olympic athletes do this all the time - training in greenhouses and the like. With his resources, he should be able to train in a variety of environments - high altitude with thin air, humid climates, windy, HOT. Perhaps removing the tennis aspect for a few weeks and just working on his cardiovascular and muscular endurance - swimming?

5.) Stop thinking about making money now. He has plenty. Taking the new racket for money just before a grandslam and without QC testing it was a bad (and greedy) idea.

6.) Stop having so much fun outside of tennis. Look how Nalbandian, Ivanovic, Safin, and the other undedicated tennis players turned out. If he cares about his legacy - which lies primarily in the number and range of slams he wins (as anyone can see, Jankovic is practically being laughed at for reaching No. 1 without any slams, clearly slams are more important) - he needs to look on tennis as a job and not a diversion. Orchestra performers practice 6-8 hours a day at least. They don't just replay their repertoire - they focus on the difficult parts by varying the rhythm, the speed, breaking it apart and rebuilding, repetition, etc. Tennis is the same. He has the strokes down. He has/had the mentality down. He needs to work on the netgame and the fitness so that he can burst through 7 five-set matches, if need be, to take the championship. If he doesn't work on his fitness in a dedicated manner, he can kiss the FO goodbye, and that's not taking into consideration what an insurmountable opponent Rafa is, either. As one can see, even the US and Australian opens are clearly liable to the fitness issue due to the heat, and Wimbledon due to rain delays and dangerous sliding on wet grass.

7.) Drop the fluff. Drop the entourages, the crazy parents and brothers at matches (except perhaps finals and semis), DeNiro, Sharapova, etc. Drop the silly interviews and statements and "My First Grand Slam" books. Focus on the work. You're not Roger, who can afford to drag along Wintour and his "RF" line - and even he looks like a clown for it - so you look like a pathetic clown all the more.

8.) Stop caring about the crowds. People don't have to like you. You must be tactful and respectful and a professional and then you will earn fans of the quality you desire. Demanding applause and favor from a crowd that understandably (or not so much) prefers another is ridiculous.

Aloimeh
01-30-2009, 02:05 AM
Novak has the heart of a champion unfortunately not the physique.

I disagree. Look at Henin. Yes, it's WTA, but she was a midget compared to all the 6'+ giantesses like Sharapova, Ivanovic, Venus, and the muscle-bound Serena. And she won a good number of slams. Keys to her success: ambition, intelligence, good coaching and good relationship with said coach, and dedication to the profession. Novak has the intelligence and ambition. He needs to change coaches to someone who can provide some new objective perspective, and he needs to sacrifice and work on his weaknesses.

sawan66278
01-30-2009, 02:11 AM
Novak's root problem is arrogance. It's what wins him matches. It's also what is currently his downfall. If he wants to succeed and become Federer's hardcourt heir, he must do several things:

1.) Fire the coach. A responsible coach would have told him to never ever quit again after that humiliating Monte Carlo debacle. Sore throat is the biggest joke ever. The blister and the asthma and the flu and even the most recent retirement were a bit more understandable - but Monte Carlo wasn't. Why hasn't the coach dealt with the problem? Probably because he fears losing his job. Such a coach is, therefore, placing his own interests above those of his trainee, and therefore cannot be trusted to give what is necessarily the best advice. However, Vajda is shortsighted, in that he will lose his job if Novak continues to flounder - it'll happen later, perhaps, than if he criticized him, but it'll happen nonetheless.

2.) Stop going in with the attitude of "all the time in the world." Federer's longevity remains an unknown. He clearly didn't "die" and Nadal is improving. Novak is young but he doesn't know what the younger generation might produce and he should always go into slams with the attitude of it being the last he has a good chance of winning. He really needs to apply more pressure in that direction. He's much too nonchalant about it.

3.) Forget about No. 2 and No. 1. They will come naturally when he starts winning slams.

4.) Focus on fitness. Olympic athletes do this all the time - training in greenhouses and the like. With his resources, he should be able to train in a variety of environments - high altitude with thin air, humid climates, windy, HOT. Perhaps removing the tennis aspect for a few weeks and just working on his cardiovascular and muscular endurance - swimming?

5.) Stop thinking about making money now. He has plenty. Taking the new racket for money just before a grandslam and without QC testing it was a bad (and greedy) idea.

6.) Stop having so much fun outside of tennis. Look how Nalbandian, Ivanovic, Safin, and the other undedicated tennis players turned out. If he cares about his legacy - which lies primarily in the number and range of slams he wins (as anyone can see, Jankovic is practically being laughed at for reaching No. 1 without any slams, clearly slams are more important) - he needs to look on tennis as a job and not a diversion. Orchestra performers practice 6-8 hours a day at least. They don't just replay their repertoire - they focus on the difficult parts by varying the rhythm, the speed, breaking it apart and rebuilding, repetition, etc. Tennis is the same. He has the strokes down. He has/had the mentality down. He needs to work on the netgame and the fitness so that he can burst through 7 five-set matches, if need be, to take the championship. If he doesn't work on his fitness in a dedicated manner, he can kiss the FO goodbye, and that's not taking into consideration what an insurmountable opponent Rafa is, either. As one can see, even the US and Australian opens are clearly liable to the fitness issue due to the heat, and Wimbledon due to rain delays and dangerous sliding on wet grass.

7.) Drop the fluff. Drop the entourages, the crazy parents and brothers at matches (except perhaps finals and semis), DeNiro, Sharapova, etc. Drop the silly interviews and statements and "My First Grand Slam" books. Focus on the work. You're not Roger, who can afford to drag along Wintour and his "RF" line - and even he looks like a clown for it - so you look like a pathetic clown all the more.

8.) Stop caring about the crowds. People don't have to like you. You must be tactful and respectful and a professional and then you will earn fans of the quality you desire. Demanding applause and favor from a crowd that understandably (or not so much) prefers another is ridiculous.

This is probably one of THE best thought-out posts so far in 2009. While I still believe his quitting at the slams is inexcusable, the point about Vajda is very true. (Aside from the fact that he may very well be THE most annoying member of the Djokovic posse...jumping and cheering as if his job security was at stake...um...it probably is, hence the inability to sit in his seat).

I would like to add one other point:

9.) Add something to your game. The man has not added a single new stroke or tactic to his game since 2007. Look at Rafa: he even came to the AO with a NEW FOREHAND...and this was AFTER ending 2008 as the best player in the world.

If Djokovic is not careful, he could very well see himself fall into the Safin level of slam victories (two to four). And with the emerging competition, and people realizing they can stick with him...he's in a mess of trouble. The tour eventually figures out the weaknesses of everyone...and this has been the case with Djokovic...and, if he is unwilling to take the job seriously, not only will he never become #1...he may never win another slam in his career.

Aloimeh
01-30-2009, 02:24 AM
This is probably one of THE best thought-out posts so far in 2009. While I still believe his quitting at the slams is inexcusable, the point about Vajda is very true. (Aside from the fact that he may very well be THE most annoying member of the Djokovic posse...jumping and cheering as if his job security was at stake...um...it probably is, hence the inability to sit in his seat).

I would like to add one other point:

9.) Add something to your game. The man has not added a single new stroke or tactic to his game since 2007. Look at Rafa: he even came to the AO with a NEW FOREHAND...and this was AFTER ending 2008 as the best player in the world.

If Djokovic is not careful, he could very well see himself fall into the Safin level of slam victories (two to four). And with the emerging competition, and people realizing they can stick with him...he's in a mess of trouble. The tour eventually figures out the weaknesses of everyone...and this has been the case with Djokovic...and, if he is unwilling to take the job seriously, not only will he never become #1...he may never win another slam in his career.

Yeah, regarding retirement, the only ones that sound legit to me are the 2006 FO with breathing problems and the Davis cup flu. The blister was iffy - it was really an excuse for the sore body from lack of fitness. The recent retirement was also iffy, as even he attributed it to soreness and fatigue and not the heat and it was especially iffy because it was so close to a conclusion. I just pointed out the Monte Carlo case since it was SO awful. What does a sore throat have to do with tennis? It doesn't affect his breathing, his movement, his endurance, etc. That was the lowest point ever, I think, at least on court. The USO 2008 and all the media bitching comes close, but not quite. In any case, we concur that Vajda should have done something about the Monte Carlo retirement and clearly did not.

This is probably why the parent/relative model of coaching is a little better - assuming they're normal (not Damir Dokic), they'll look after their kid's success and won't worry about losing a job. That, or somebody who is willing to coach Novak purely out of interest in improving his game and not money - perhaps his old coach Gencic? Money makes everything a lot more complicated.

Re: 9, what do you suggest he can add? Net game and fitness are key.

Yeah, the way I see it either he will end up being a 1-2 slam wonder or he will end up getting a whole bunch - but only if he fixes his problems - and they are many, at this point - fast.

BalkanBoy
01-30-2009, 02:27 AM
I disagree. Look at Henin. Yes, it's WTA, but she was a midget compared to all the 6'+ giantesses like Sharapova, Ivanovic, Venus, and the muscle-bound Serena. And she won a good number of slams. Keys to her success: ambition, intelligence, good coaching and good relationship with said coach, and dedication to the profession. Novak has the intelligence and ambition. He needs to change coaches to someone who can provide some new objective perspective, and he needs to sacrifice and work on his weaknesses.

There's some truth there but Nole has the breathing problems which fatigue him faster and worsen with heat. It's genetic and I don't think he can do anything to it but retire when it happens :shrug:

Nole had the game to defend his throne but the heat killed him, you could see it in his eyes.

I wouldn't blame the organisers if the damn roof stayed open for everyone but they closed it for Serena on 50 degres C and let it open for Nole on 60 :rolleyes:

Aloimeh
01-30-2009, 02:32 AM
There's some truth there but Nole has the breathing problems which fatigue him faster and worsen with heat. It's genetic and I don't think he can do anything to it but retire when it happens :shrug:

Nole had the game to defend his throne but the heat killed him, you could see it in his eyes.

I wouldn't blame the organisers if the damn roof stayed open for everyone but they closed it for Serena on 50 degres C and let it open for Nole on 60 :rolleyes:

OK, what is the breathing problem? It was said that it was a deviated septum.

Is it asthma?

It was not the heat so much as fatigue and sloppy form. He didn't even attribute it to heat in the interview. I think the heat was certainly an aggravating factor - perhaps it pushed his fatigue over the edge - but if he was fresh (and he wasn't), he should have been able to play through the heat. Would he have beaten Roddick if he wasn't exhausted, with the current form? Probably. Probably he wouldn't then go on to beat Federer, however.

Henry Chinaski
01-30-2009, 02:41 AM
It's clear that his confidence has been utterly shot. You just have to look at his forehand. He used to thrive on high bouncing balls, hitting down on the ball as flat as possible for winners from anywhere in the court. It didn't matter if it was coming slowly or quickly. He could use the pace of the shot just as easily as he could generate his own. It was unplayable at times.

Against Roddick the vast majority of his forehands were nervous, defensive and short with heavy top-spin, mostly landing inside the service line. He stepped it up momentarily in the tiebreak and hit some fh winners but he couldn't keep it up. It can only be a mental issue and fuck knows what has caused it.

Balkan Boy, you must be high if you believe some of the temperatures in your post.

MIMIC
01-30-2009, 02:49 AM
9.) Add something to your game. The man has not added a single new stroke or tactic to his game since 2007. Look at Rafa: he even came to the AO with a NEW FOREHAND...and this was AFTER ending 2008 as the best player in the world.

I don't think that that's 100% accurate. Novak is definitely using the backhand slice a lot more to cut the pace (a la Murray, Federer).

wilmar
01-30-2009, 03:16 AM
Novak's root problem is arrogance. It's what wins him matches. It's also what is currently his downfall. If he wants to succeed and become Federer's hardcourt heir, he must do several things:

1.) Fire the coach. A responsible coach would have told him to never ever quit again after that humiliating Monte Carlo debacle. Sore throat is the biggest joke ever. The blister and the asthma and the flu and even the most recent retirement were a bit more understandable - but Monte Carlo wasn't. Why hasn't the coach dealt with the problem? Probably because he fears losing his job. Such a coach is, therefore, placing his own interests above those of his trainee, and therefore cannot be trusted to give what is necessarily the best advice. However, Vajda is shortsighted, in that he will lose his job if Novak continues to flounder - it'll happen later, perhaps, than if he criticized him, but it'll happen nonetheless.

2.) Stop going in with the attitude of "all the time in the world." Federer's longevity remains an unknown. He clearly didn't "die" and Nadal is improving. Novak is young but he doesn't know what the younger generation might produce and he should always go into slams with the attitude of it being the last he has a good chance of winning. He really needs to apply more pressure in that direction. He's much too nonchalant about it.

3.) Forget about No. 2 and No. 1. They will come naturally when he starts winning slams.

4.) Focus on fitness. Olympic athletes do this all the time - training in greenhouses and the like. With his resources, he should be able to train in a variety of environments - high altitude with thin air, humid climates, windy, HOT. Perhaps removing the tennis aspect for a few weeks and just working on his cardiovascular and muscular endurance - swimming?

5.) Stop thinking about making money now. He has plenty. Taking the new racket for money just before a grandslam and without QC testing it was a bad (and greedy) idea.

6.) Stop having so much fun outside of tennis. Look how Nalbandian, Ivanovic, Safin, and the other undedicated tennis players turned out. If he cares about his legacy - which lies primarily in the number and range of slams he wins (as anyone can see, Jankovic is practically being laughed at for reaching No. 1 without any slams, clearly slams are more important) - he needs to look on tennis as a job and not a diversion. Orchestra performers practice 6-8 hours a day at least. They don't just replay their repertoire - they focus on the difficult parts by varying the rhythm, the speed, breaking it apart and rebuilding, repetition, etc. Tennis is the same. He has the strokes down. He has/had the mentality down. He needs to work on the netgame and the fitness so that he can burst through 7 five-set matches, if need be, to take the championship. If he doesn't work on his fitness in a dedicated manner, he can kiss the FO goodbye, and that's not taking into consideration what an insurmountable opponent Rafa is, either. As one can see, even the US and Australian opens are clearly liable to the fitness issue due to the heat, and Wimbledon due to rain delays and dangerous sliding on wet grass.

7.) Drop the fluff. Drop the entourages, the crazy parents and brothers at matches (except perhaps finals and semis), DeNiro, Sharapova, etc. Drop the silly interviews and statements and "My First Grand Slam" books. Focus on the work. You're not Roger, who can afford to drag along Wintour and his "RF" line - and even he looks like a clown for it - so you look like a pathetic clown all the more.

8.) Stop caring about the crowds. People don't have to like you. You must be tactful and respectful and a professional and then you will earn fans of the quality you desire. Demanding applause and favor from a crowd that understandably (or not so much) prefers another is ridiculous.

Excellent post!

I'd like to highlight though the link between his fitness to his arrogance/over-confidence.

He stated that he trained in the high altitudes off season to better prepare himself. But given this retiring issue again, I wonder what sort of and how much fitness training he put in.

He also arrived in Australia late thus having no time for conditioning and practice.

I think his "arrogance" of thinking he has done enough probably led to his training regime (or lack of), and ultimately his inability to improve as a player.

Also, he has already slipped into this habit of choosing the easy way out in tough situations with his retirements. It doesn't do anything for his mental fortitude or character building.

I think the root of his issues all trace back to his Ego, which is something he has to deal with first and foremost before anything positive can come out of his career.

xargon
01-30-2009, 03:17 AM
Very good analysis of what he could potentially do. First of all I don't think one GS, 2 master's, bronze medal and YEC is shabby. Now for anyone to say he didn't get another GS the same year is absurd during the dominant Fed Rafa era. Pete took 3 years to get his 2nd GS. He says in his book it took him awhile to get his shit together. Now, I've heard he has a physical defect with his thorax and sports related athma. I am sure to publicly reveal something like this could ruin his career. Here is an old post on it and if true could explain a lot.
------------------------------
I'm no expert, nor esp informed poster, but as I understood from more knowlegable people and some interviews (mainly that of his and Rafas PR man Barbarilo), Nole has a classic case of undeveloped thorax (the part of the human body between the neck and the diaphragm, partially encased by the ribs and containing the heart and lungs; the chest) due to nose deviation that he operated on couple of years ago - his lungs couldn't develop properly when they were due.

Such condition, while common and not esp hard on ordinary people can greatly affect professional athletes who travel the world and are exposed to various climate conditions.

That coupled with immunity problems (that are kinda side effects to this small thorax thing), competitive frustrations and anxious moments in crunch time, can lead to severe falls of play, best seen at Monte Carlo when he retired against Roger.

I believe that he is a smart young man, and is surrounded with smart people (barring some exceptions) that advise him to take it easy. So I think that the best of him in competitive and trophy terms is not to be seen until some years in the future, when his medical condition is brought in proper order. Until that time, however, breakdowns of that stamina/anxiousness type will still exist.
http://www.menstennisforums.com/showthread.php?t=129711&page=2

MrChopin
01-30-2009, 03:22 AM
Novak's root problem is arrogance. It's what wins him matches. It's also what is currently his downfall. If he wants to succeed and become Federer's hardcourt heir, he must do several things:

1.) Fire the coach. A responsible coach would have told him to never ever quit again after that humiliating Monte Carlo debacle. Sore throat is the biggest joke ever. The blister and the asthma and the flu and even the most recent retirement were a bit more understandable - but Monte Carlo wasn't. Why hasn't the coach dealt with the problem? Probably because he fears losing his job. Such a coach is, therefore, placing his own interests above those of his trainee, and therefore cannot be trusted to give what is necessarily the best advice. However, Vajda is shortsighted, in that he will lose his job if Novak continues to flounder - it'll happen later, perhaps, than if he criticized him, but it'll happen nonetheless.

2.) Stop going in with the attitude of "all the time in the world." Federer's longevity remains an unknown. He clearly didn't "die" and Nadal is improving. Novak is young but he doesn't know what the younger generation might produce and he should always go into slams with the attitude of it being the last he has a good chance of winning. He really needs to apply more pressure in that direction. He's much too nonchalant about it.

3.) Forget about No. 2 and No. 1. They will come naturally when he starts winning slams.

4.) Focus on fitness. Olympic athletes do this all the time - training in greenhouses and the like. With his resources, he should be able to train in a variety of environments - high altitude with thin air, humid climates, windy, HOT. Perhaps removing the tennis aspect for a few weeks and just working on his cardiovascular and muscular endurance - swimming?

5.) Stop thinking about making money now. He has plenty. Taking the new racket for money just before a grandslam and without QC testing it was a bad (and greedy) idea.

6.) Stop having so much fun outside of tennis. Look how Nalbandian, Ivanovic, Safin, and the other undedicated tennis players turned out. If he cares about his legacy - which lies primarily in the number and range of slams he wins (as anyone can see, Jankovic is practically being laughed at for reaching No. 1 without any slams, clearly slams are more important) - he needs to look on tennis as a job and not a diversion. Orchestra performers practice 6-8 hours a day at least. They don't just replay their repertoire - they focus on the difficult parts by varying the rhythm, the speed, breaking it apart and rebuilding, repetition, etc. Tennis is the same. He has the strokes down. He has/had the mentality down. He needs to work on the netgame and the fitness so that he can burst through 7 five-set matches, if need be, to take the championship. If he doesn't work on his fitness in a dedicated manner, he can kiss the FO goodbye, and that's not taking into consideration what an insurmountable opponent Rafa is, either. As one can see, even the US and Australian opens are clearly liable to the fitness issue due to the heat, and Wimbledon due to rain delays and dangerous sliding on wet grass.

7.) Drop the fluff. Drop the entourages, the crazy parents and brothers at matches (except perhaps finals and semis), DeNiro, Sharapova, etc. Drop the silly interviews and statements and "My First Grand Slam" books. Focus on the work. You're not Roger, who can afford to drag along Wintour and his "RF" line - and even he looks like a clown for it - so you look like a pathetic clown all the more.

8.) Stop caring about the crowds. People don't have to like you. You must be tactful and respectful and a professional and then you will earn fans of the quality you desire. Demanding applause and favor from a crowd that understandably (or not so much) prefers another is ridiculous.

Nice post!

Castielo
01-30-2009, 03:28 AM
Someone have to try waiting 3 hour, then playing 3,5 hour, then baked 31 hour later.

pricdews
01-30-2009, 03:43 AM
He will be number 1, in 2011 when federer retires and before the new dominant player comes.

I think this is the key. He no longer thinks he'll be #1 in the next couple of years. IMO it's Nadal's improvement that's bothered him. Odds are Nadal will slow down in a couple of years (accumulating injuries, wearing out his knees, etc) but until then, Djokovic is playing for #2. For him #2 isn't worth complete dedication. Between burn out and off-court distractions (all this money and attention), he's not putting tennis first constantly (see Agassi's late youth). Add extreme conditions and some breathing issues (? asthma) in the mix and you get what we saw this week. He's not going to risk long-term injury for the right to be #2 in the world. I expect the occasional top result for the next 2 years and then around 2011 he'll get serious about trying to dominate the sport.

wilmar
01-30-2009, 04:09 AM
IMO it's Nadal's improvement that's bothered him.

I think so too. To me, the turning point for Djoke's slump is his two missed opportunities to take over Nadal as #2.

Odds are Nadal will slow down in a couple of years (accumulating injuries, wearing out his knees, etc) but until then, Djokovic is playing for #2. For him #2 isn't worth complete dedication. Between burn out and off-court distractions (all this money and attention), he's not putting tennis first constantly (see Agassi's late youth). Add extreme conditions and some breathing issues (? asthma) in the mix and you get what we saw this week. He's not going to risk long-term injury for the right to be #2 in the world. I expect the occasional top result for the next 2 years and then around 2011 he'll get serious about trying to dominate the sport.

But provided he can maintain his level and fitness then. It won't be easy and go according to his script.

pricdews
01-30-2009, 04:42 AM
I think deep down Djokovic has enough confidence to avoid getting completely messed up in the head over the next couple of years. Within a few years he should reach #1. Whether or not he has the desire to do what it takes to sustain being #1 is the question. And there is always the risk of some young guy coming out of nowhere but I haven't seen anyone coming up that should get in Djokovic's way during 2011-20012.

thesonofgray
01-30-2009, 04:44 AM
OK, what is the breathing problem? It was said that it was a deviated septum.

Is it asthma?

It was not the heat so much as fatigue and sloppy form. He didn't even attribute it to heat in the interview. I think the heat was certainly an aggravating factor - perhaps it pushed his fatigue over the edge - but if he was fresh (and he wasn't), he should have been able to play through the heat. Would he have beaten Roddick if he wasn't exhausted, with the current form? Probably. Probably he wouldn't then go on to beat Federer, however.

According to Roddick's interview, Djokovic told him the heat was too much before retiring.

With all the crummy excuses to this and past retirements, it makes me wonder if there's a condition there that he doesn't want to make public.

BalkanBoy
01-30-2009, 05:43 AM
OK, what is the breathing problem? It was said that it was a deviated septum.

Is it asthma?

It was not the heat so much as fatigue and sloppy form. He didn't even attribute it to heat in the interview. I think the heat was certainly an aggravating factor - perhaps it pushed his fatigue over the edge - but if he was fresh (and he wasn't), he should have been able to play through the heat. Would he have beaten Roddick if he wasn't exhausted, with the current form? Probably. Probably he wouldn't then go on to beat Federer, however.

I don't know what it is and we will maybe never know until he retires (completely). If he has medical problems it would be stupid to tell now for obvious reasons. He doesn't want to arm his opponents. I think the breathing problems he had in the past made his system weaker and not developed to its full capacity. It's why he always look like he's going to die on the court. In the end we can just make assumptions but one think is clear to me, he has issues with the heat and breathing(lungs? which create less red globules then normally but that is more of your domain ;).

It's clear that his confidence has been utterly shot. You just have to look at his forehand. He used to thrive on high bouncing balls, hitting down on the ball as flat as possible for winners from anywhere in the court. It didn't matter if it was coming slowly or quickly. He could use the pace of the shot just as easily as he could generate his own. It was unplayable at times.

Against Roddick the vast majority of his forehands were nervous, defensive and short with heavy top-spin, mostly landing inside the service line. He stepped it up momentarily in the tiebreak and hit some fh winners but he couldn't keep it up. It can only be a mental issue and fuck knows what has caused it.

Balkan Boy, you must be high if you believe some of the temperatures in your post.

Did you followed the matches on a scoreboard? They showed several times the temperatures on the court.

ORGASMATRON
01-30-2009, 05:50 AM
I think MTF is too hard on the Djoker. He's got a great record and he's still young, give the guy a damn break and rather fix your own shortcomings.

Aloimeh
01-30-2009, 05:52 AM
I don't think it's reactivity to dust, which might be inferred based on the French Open and Monte Carlo retirements. No dust at AO and Wimbledon. It may be heat, but then how do we explain the Wimbledon retirement (not so hot, was it)?

Whatever it is, he needs to see a doctor, that is, unless it's purely due to fatigue.

XXX13
01-30-2009, 06:07 AM
Hes get much attention and critics because hes world #3. Change the angle, with that long ret record, he is still world #3. He is good,isnt he?

fast_clay
01-30-2009, 08:22 AM
good point alomeih about the coach...

the brush would tar the coach with a few heavier strokes if he is unable to be honest with the student... which begs the question... is vajda just a yes man...?

Henry Chinaski
01-30-2009, 08:31 AM
I don't know what it is and we will maybe never know until he retires (completely). If he has medical problems it would be stupid to tell now for obvious reasons. He doesn't want to arm his opponents. I think the breathing problems he had in the past made his system weaker and not developed to its full capacity. It's why he always look like he's going to die on the court. In the end we can just make assumptions but one think is clear to me, he has issues with the heat and breathing(lungs? which create less red globules then normally but that is more of your domain ;).



Did you followed the matches on a scoreboard? They showed several times the temperatures on the court.

I did watch it and the commentators never mentioned any excessive heat.
ESPN can only have had a faulty thermometer. 60 degrees is insane. That would put it 3 degrees higher than the hottest temperature ever officially recorded in history and 10 dgrees more than the first setting on my oven.

Several posters from Melbourne have stated that the temperature that day was about 31 c while it was closer to 40 the following day.

His first words to the trainer were "I feel very dizzy" so I'm not necessarily it was an illegitimate retirement at all just disputing some of the temperature figure being thrown around here.

Jōris
01-30-2009, 09:56 AM
Djokovic may be acting out a self-fulfilling prophecy by retiring against the player and media that he feels negatively labelled him. Subconsciously he accepts a victim role and lives up to that negative label in order to meet expectations.

Or maybe, and this is also plausible, I need to stop watching Dr. Phil.

the graduate
01-30-2009, 11:40 AM
here is your answer www.realtalkny.net scroll down to hot links 29.1.09

thesonofgray
01-30-2009, 02:10 PM
I don't think it's reactivity to dust, which might be inferred based on the French Open and Monte Carlo retirements. No dust at AO and Wimbledon. It may be heat, but then how do we explain the Wimbledon retirement (not so hot, was it)?

Whatever it is, he needs to see a doctor, that is, unless it's purely due to fatigue.

Maybe humidity? I know high humidity can drop a person with breathing troubles faster than heat.

Radalek
01-30-2009, 04:38 PM
I don't think it's reactivity to dust, which might be inferred based on the French Open and Monte Carlo retirements. No dust at AO and Wimbledon. It may be heat, but then how do we explain the Wimbledon retirement (not so hot, was it)?

Whatever it is, he needs to see a doctor, that is, unless it's purely due to fatigue.

Wimbledon was pure fatigue if I remember well.He played 5 hours with Bagy 24h earlier and almost 5h with Hewitt round before.It was poor scheduling of organisators (he played Haas(?) partialy for 3 days cos of rain delays and his match was really poor scheduled and had to play Hewitt a day after) combined with his blowing 2-0 lead against Baggy and drawing him self for 5 hours cos of that.He was totaly worn off...

marcRD
01-30-2009, 05:41 PM
Do you guys remember that 5 set match Federer had against Nalby in master cup? He went into the tournament from an injury and while leading 2-0 in sets he started to feel that injury again. He lost the 2 next sets 6-2 6-1 and was 4-0 down in the third when he made a great come back and even served for the match, but Nalby was in the end too good that night.

Anyway, Djokovic would never play a match like that, he would retire somewhere between the third and 5th set. When he starts losing a match and something in his body is wrong he can only focus on his injury and starts whining and get a devestated look on his face while Federer or even Nadal try to make the impression that they are not injured at all, no matter how much pain they are feeling. Djokovic thinks it is better to make it look like he lost the match because of an injury, while Federer and Nadal have hearths of champions and dont care how they lose tennis matches, they only focus on the slight chanse of winning they might still have.

fast_clay
01-30-2009, 05:47 PM
it was a wimbledon sf ffs... who retires from one of those...? after being at the gasquet - gonz match and watch gasquet carry on playing with blisters on AO hardcourt, i can for sure say that gasquet has more heart than djokovic... amazing statement i know...

fast_clay
01-30-2009, 05:57 PM
Djokovic thinks it is better to make it look like he lost the match because of an injury, while Federer and Nadal have hearths of champions and dont care how they lose tennis matches, they only focus on the slight chanse of winning they might still have.

Action Jackson knows this story better than i, but... there was a coach of Horst Skoff and Thomas Muster, who, when training them as kids, who instruct them to make an excuse for losing everytime they lost... this would later have them labelled as wankers, yet, it would suggest that there is more than one way to breed a tour level player - however negative it would seem... brad gilbert would also preach on bringing the worst out in an opponent when you are not at your best... another negative train of thought...

whatever is really going on in djokovic's head who copuld really know... but, the protection of an ego and the constant training of himself that he hasn't truly been beaten by another player inside a retirement due to outside factors could be one explinations...

what is sure though, is that... while i would recognise that there is both negative and positive ways to grows a player with reasonable, the negative examples i used in the first paragraph at least allow for the honour in completing a match... something that seems vacant in the way djokovic is managining his grand slam career...

«Ivan»
01-30-2009, 07:49 PM
I used to really like the kid when he came on the scene

'n you're 22?

we should ask his papa where is nole's heart.

BalkanBoy
01-30-2009, 08:26 PM
I did watch it and the commentators never mentioned any excessive heat.
ESPN can only have had a faulty thermometer. 60 degrees is insane. That would put it 3 degrees higher than the hottest temperature ever officially recorded in history and 10 dgrees more than the first setting on my oven.

Several posters from Melbourne have stated that the temperature that day was about 31 c while it was closer to 40 the following day.

His first words to the trainer were "I feel very dizzy" so I'm not necessarily it was an illegitimate retirement at all just disputing some of the temperature figure being thrown around here.

You're confusing on court temperature and outside temp. Also I don't think ESPN has anything to do with the thermometer in the Rod Laver Arena ;) and yes over 60 degrees is insane it's why they should have done something like they did for ALL the others after.

ClaudiuS
01-31-2009, 03:34 PM
Also, people should add, that Djokovic wasn't in the same form as last year, he had a sort of tough match and even lost a set to AMER DELIC ffs!! He had the same speed to run the court, but he was commiting a large number of errors. The only time where I saw Djokovic getting near to the level of last year was in the last set against Baghdatis.

So why people always looks reasons located on the outside of Djokovic's game, why don't you blame him? maybe it was Djokovic responsability, he wasn't ready enough to reach the same form as last year. So he's loss wasn't much unexpected.

Chupakabra
01-31-2009, 04:01 PM
The only time where I saw Djokovic getting near to the level of last year was in the last set against Baghdatis.

I think you should also mention 2nd and 3rd set in the match against Jeremy Chardy in the 2nd Rnd when he definititely looked like he came back to Champion's form he had in the previous year's AO... In those 2 sets, the way he played definitely looked like he was going to win the whole thing once again, but then again, in his next matches he wasn't that good as he was in that one against Chardy.

ClaudiuS
01-31-2009, 05:00 PM
I think you should also mention 2nd and 3rd set in the match against Jeremy Chardy in the 2nd Rnd when he definititely looked like he came back to Champion's form he had in the previous year's AO... In those 2 sets, the way he played definitely looked like he was going to win the whole thing once again, but then again, in his next matches he wasn't that good as he was in that one against Chardy.

I only mentioned the match against Baghdatis because it was one of the only matches that I had the chance to see from Djokovic at this AO were he was playing in a very good form performing great winners. But I also watched the one against Delic, the movements were all right, but there was also something that really suprised me about his game, and it was his large amount of UE. I can't make an opinion about the match against Chardy, because I didn't watch it.

sawan66278
01-31-2009, 05:05 PM
Here's what Pat Rafter thinks:

Patrick Rafter has voiced his doubts about the desire of deposed Australian Open winner Novak Djokovic after the Serb's retirement during his quarterfinal with Andy Roddick.

During a television match commentary, the two-time US Open champion, and one of the most popular of the former Aussie players, had his say about the increasingly controversial Djokovic.

Rafter said that the 21-year-old had a history of "pulling the pin" (with four retirements in Grand Slam matches). Everyone wonders when he's going to call the trainer again," said Rafter. "The wonder if he's playing games or is he for real. It's definitely out there and players are aware of him."

xargon
01-31-2009, 06:44 PM
Monfils is also like that. Maybe they are sick.

federernadalfan
01-31-2009, 07:17 PM
thermometer reading two years ago in rod laver. 116 F, 46.7 C so they say in an article. In the mid 50s C on djoko roddick day seems quite possible.
http://cache.daylife.com/imageserve/071010q7st9LL/610x.jpg

sawan66278
01-31-2009, 09:03 PM
Another perspective, courtesy of www.tennistalk.com:

Only a year ago, Serbian upstart, Novak Djokovic, stood on the edge of celebrating his first win at a major tournament. At the conclusion of the 2007 Australian Open, Djokovic had dismissed Roger Federer,- ranked number one at the time- captured worldwide attention and secured the biggest title of his career in spectacular fashion.

He appeared on the pages of several famous magazines, including Men's Vogue and GQ. The current world number three also stopped by the Tonight Show in Los Angeles, treating host Jay Leno and his guests to a sneak peek inside the world of a young, skyrocketing tennis talent.

As I watch the video for a second time, I'm struck by the ease with which he handles an audience of millions. Djokovic is affable, personable and downright charming. He's likeable, well-spoken and perfectly poised to take on the responsibility of representing the upper echelon of professional tennis.

The smile quickly disappears from my face, however, when I stop to consider how the Serb treated the fans in attendance for his 2009 Australian Open title defense. (For those who may not know, Djokovic has yet to successfully defend a title in his professional career.) In front of a capacity crowd in Melbourne, as well as countless others watching the tournament from the comfort of their living rooms, Novak Djokovic, world number three and defending champion, retired during his quarterfinal match against Andy Roddick.

Granted, the Serb struggled with the conditions. Everyone knows the January heat in Australia can bring a man to his knees, and to be fair, Djokovic looked a bit dizzy and lethargic at the beginning of the second set. Roddick faced the same conditions, though- the same heat, the same stifling humidity and the same clouds of suffocating dust, covering the tournament grounds.

Djokovic is no stranger to throwing in the towel at grandslams. While competing at Roland Garros in 2006 and Wimbledon in 2007, the Serb waved the white flag while facing world number one, Rafael Nadal, -ranked second in the world at the time of both matches- the former during a quarterfinal meeting, the latter a semifinal. With the addition of the latest debacle at the Australian Open, Djokovic stands to complete a quartet of retirements that a most unforgiving media dubbed, the "retirement slam."

The press had a field day with Djokovic, pelting him with insults and a medley of four-letter words, barely camouflaged by their sanitized bylines. Roger Federer, making no attempt to hide his disdain for the Serb, barked the following comments to anyone within earshot:

"He's not a guy who's never given up before ... it's disappointing. I've only done it once in my career ... Andy totally deserved to win that match. I'm almost in favor of saying, you know what, if you're not fit enough, just get out of here. If Novak were up two sets to love I don't think he would have retired 4-0 down in the fourth."

Setting aside interpersonal quarrels and questions of character for a moment, I have but one concern- money. In my view, by giving up as he did, Djokovic cost the ATP a lot of money.

Adam Helfant, the cheery, brand-spanking-new CEO, gave a press conference earlier this month, calling professional tennis "one of the world's most popular sports." Hmmm. If Mr. Helfant was just putting on a dog and pony show for a roomful of journalists, I take no issue with his statement. Adherence to the Pollyanna principle may be tantamount to verbal saccharine, but as exalted leader of an international business, Helfant has to smile and nod on cue as part of his job description. Should the Grand Poobah of tennis find himself speaking in deadly earnest, however, I have to question his sanity, or at the very least, his logic.

The ATP finished 2008 in a huge financial hole- seven figures deep, to be exact. The company is in dire need of attention, promotion, and most importantly, revenue. Forget about the loyal base of fans professional tennis already has for a second- many of us, our relatives and friends are long-term, card-carrying members of that group. Tennis needs new fans, more fans, young fans, cash-flush fans, undiscovered fans. Tennis needs fans who will generously support it, and commit to spending part of their income on a sport in desperate need of monetary assistance.

I wish I could turn a blind eye and file the Djokovic Oz retirement under the heading of g.a.f., but I can't. While the world waits for the first grandslam winner of the year, -some making deals with god no doubt, hoping Roger Federer will equal the number of major titles held by tennis cyborg, Pete Sampras, others salivating over the thought of Rafael Nadal capturing his first hardcourt championship- my mind wanders.

As I sit here, I think about the wealth of potential fans the ATP may have lost in the wake of Novak Djokovic's surrender.

I wonder how many people there were relaxing at home, sinking into their sofa cushions, sipping a cold beverage with remote control in hand. Those people, undecided and/or indifferent to tennis, might have stumbled onto some late night television coverage of the Aussie Open on ESPN. Perhaps the mano-a-mano combat piqued their interest for a second. Maybe some of them considered adding professional tennis to their list of "must see" sporting events. Would there be a place within their regular rotation for the ATP, along with the likes of the NFL, the NBA, the NHL or MLB?

As I hear the deafening sound of remote controls clicking, their owners in search of a sport where the word "quit," doesn't exist, I suppose we'll never know.

BalkanBoy
01-31-2009, 11:06 PM
I wish I could buy some toilet paper with all these hypocrite writers analysis printed on it.

just one exemple
"Setting aside interpersonal quarrels and questions of character for a moment, I have but one concern- money. In my view, by giving up as he did, Djokovic cost the ATP a lot of money."

First they make their best for him to lose in the way he lost then they accuse him of costing them money :haha: Are you going to sue him now?

And i'm serious here if anyone can save Nole well that's Roger, keep it up with these dirty comments king! If I was Nole I would train day and night just to make sure you don't get that 15th slam to surpass Sampras.

oranges
01-31-2009, 11:47 PM
He's a bit late for #14, should have beaten Roddick for that, now he can only pray for Nadal to do it ;)

Castielo
01-31-2009, 11:48 PM
Novak better wish he were balkanboy.

BalkanBoy
02-01-2009, 12:23 AM
He's a bit late for #14, should have beaten Roddick for that, now he can only pray for Nadal to do it ;)

:lol: I meant 15th but anyway Vamos Nadal!

Novak better wish he were balkanboy.

Well that's not mission impossible I could easly be his sosie if he needs me :p

bobbynorwich
02-05-2009, 03:37 AM
Dfaker works for me.

xargon
02-05-2009, 03:56 AM
I think that Djok will win a few more events but ultimately, due to his asthma or whatever he has, he will be concentrating on the business end of the sport. I think they are opening two tennis schools in Serbia and hosting the Belgrade Open.