Who Is The Most Clutch Player at 6-6 (5-6*) Final Set Breaker? [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Who Is The Most Clutch Player at 6-6 (5-6*) Final Set Breaker?

Iván
01-16-2009, 02:44 PM
After watching JCF'S agonizing defeat to Kohl the other day i though to myself after all these matches i have watched, who is the most dependable in this situation, my question is, who would you pick in that situation to win the point.

I want to see who you guys think would handle the pressure best and produce a well Structured point.

Horatio Caine
01-16-2009, 02:46 PM
Probably Rafa, in most situations.

finishingmove
01-16-2009, 02:47 PM
nadal?

federernadalfan
01-16-2009, 02:53 PM
rafa

Serenidad
01-16-2009, 02:54 PM
It isn't really Nadal. How often does Nadal have TB scores that go over 7:5. It is really Fred he always manages to drag Murray and other players to 6:6 even though he loses eventually anyway now. :tape;

groundstroke
01-16-2009, 02:57 PM
Federer. He had this record a couple of years ago when he won like 20 tiebreakers in a row.

And to the above that said Nadal, he isn't even close.

Horatio Caine
01-16-2009, 03:03 PM
Federer. He had this record a couple of years ago when he won like 20 tiebreakers in a row.

And to the above that said Nadal, he isn't even close.

If we go by ivan's scoreline, the opponent is serving for the match at *6-5 in the tiebreak? In which case, I'd rather trust the best returner in the world over a man who, these days, is more prone to shitting his pants if his backhand gets unwanted attention.

finishingmove
01-16-2009, 03:19 PM
our clutch friend's backhand was featured on failblog.org

f1KqPDjjnm8

groundstroke
01-16-2009, 03:24 PM
If we go by ivan's scoreline, the opponent is serving for the match at *6-5 in the tiebreak? In which case, I'd rather trust the best returner in the world over a man who, these days, is more prone to shitting his pants if his backhand gets unwanted attention.
you're saying Federer's backhand is shit? i'll tell you this - i'm not one of these idiots that posts at MTF, i understand tennis, im not delusional, im not a fanboy, and nadal isn't the best returner in the world, murray is (even though i don't like him very much).

talking about *6-5, i do remember wimbledon 2008.

wait. i think it slipped your mind, so i will now let you think about it, have a moment to think, then post again. :)

HattonWBA
01-16-2009, 03:24 PM
Rafa

Horatio Caine
01-16-2009, 03:30 PM
you're saying Federer's backhand is shit? i'll tell you this - i'm not one of these idiots that posts at MTF, i understand tennis, im not delusional, im not a fanboy, and nadal isn't the best returner in the world, murray is (even though i don't like him very much).

talking about *6-5, i do remember wimbledon 2008.

wait. i think it slipped your mind, so i will now let you think about it, have a moment to think, then post again. :)

That was one such occasion...I'm more concerned about a player who could dig themselves out of such a hole multiple times. And, for me, Rafa is more the man to do it, over Federer.

:wavey:

elessar
01-16-2009, 03:33 PM
Let me think:
Rafa's won 81 TBs lost 57 (that's a 0.58 winning %) and is 2-6 in TBs in GS finals
Roger's won 241 TBs lost 127 (that's a 0.66 winning %) and is 15-2 in TBs in GS finals

Numbers don't lie gotta go with rafa in this one.

groundstroke
01-16-2009, 03:33 PM
That was one such occasion...I'm more concerned about a player who could dig themselves out of such a hole multiple times. And, for me, Rafa is more the man to do it, over Federer.

:wavey:
one occasion of a wimbledon final.. where he has so much pressure on him.. not exactly just a "one-off".

give me one occasion where nadal has fought off a 6-5 against someone in the tie-break?

while federer has done this to a few players, Roddick is one he did a couple of years ago (2003)

ORGASMATRON
01-16-2009, 03:35 PM
Probably Rafa.

malisha
01-16-2009, 03:36 PM
Tipsa and Duck

Horatio Caine
01-16-2009, 03:43 PM
one occasion of a wimbledon final.. where he has so much pressure on him.. not exactly just a "one-off".

As you say, "one occasion of a wimbledon final" - therefore, a one-off.


give me one occasion where nadal has fought off a 6-5 against someone in the tie-break?

while federer has done this to a few players, Roddick is one he did a couple of years ago (2003)

Voo is probably the only poster on here that has swallowed, and digested, the "encyclopaedia of tennis statistics from 2003 to the present day"...so I couldn't tell you a single occasion when Nadal might have triumphed in such a situation.


The beauty of the question is that there isn't a right or wrong answer (unless someone were to mention an Isner :o), but I'm merely questioning your almost "dismissive" belief that Nadal isn't a factor, when the guy is generally (much) more reliable on the return, than Federer (who, as I've mentioned, and practically anyone knows, has a notable weakness with his backhand).

groundstroke
01-16-2009, 03:45 PM
i didnt say federer is a better returner than nadal?

Horatio Caine
01-16-2009, 03:49 PM
i didnt say federer is a better returner than nadal?

Gah, nevermind...confusing myself now as well. :o

Yves.
01-16-2009, 03:49 PM
Fed, without a doubt.

finishingmove
01-16-2009, 03:50 PM
Tipsa

:lol:

ivekinjo
01-16-2009, 03:50 PM
Why PHM aint listed?

elessar
01-16-2009, 03:53 PM
i didnt say federer is a better returner than nadal?
You should have :lol:
Except for the last year or so where every area of Roger's game generally sucked, he's probably one of the greatest first serve returner in the history of the game :shrug:

groundstroke
01-16-2009, 03:54 PM
our clutch friend's backhand was featured on failblog.org

f1KqPDjjnm8
that was once.. nadull, djokovic, murray, etc, have all made embarrassing errors as well..

by the way, is this federer's backhand? are you sure, because MTF logic would say no.

h8e5P5NfoEw&fmt=18

Tommy fan
01-16-2009, 04:27 PM
Right now? Murray I guess..

Voo de Mar
01-16-2009, 05:10 PM
give me one occasion where nadal has fought off a 6-5 against someone in the tie-break?


:)

I'll give you more:


Auckland '04: Ancic 7-6(0) 7-6(6) -> 1:5, 4:6 in the TB
Davis Cup '04: Roddick 6-7(6) 6-2 7-6(6) 6-2 -> 5:6 in the 2nd TB
Madrid '05: Stepanek 7-6(9) 6-4 -> 6:7 & 7:8 in the TB
Miami '07: Mello 7-6(7) 6-2 -> 6:7 in the TB
Chennai '08: Moya 6-7(3) 7-6(8) 7-6(1) -> 3:6 & 6:7 in the TB
Hamburg '08: Starace 6-4 7-6(6) -> 5:6 in the TB

elessar
01-16-2009, 05:14 PM
That's cheating, Starace double faulted on that SP :p

Voo de Mar
01-16-2009, 05:17 PM
The reasonable answer to the topic question isn't very hard. Simply you should know the process of at least 14 points tie-tiebraks of the best players in the world (I know it in the most cases) and calculate the ratio of wins to defeats :shrug:

Voo de Mar
01-16-2009, 05:18 PM
That's cheating, Starace double faulted on that SP :p

Yes, that's not Nadal's fault :cool:

scarecrows
01-16-2009, 05:20 PM
The reasonable answer to the topic question isn't very hard. Simply you should know the process of at least 14 points tie-tiebraks of the best players in the world (I know it in the most cases) and calculate the ratio of wins to defeats :shrug:

in many of those TBs it's *5-6 and not 5-6* like the OP stated

duong
01-16-2009, 05:20 PM
Federer has returned so many such situations

that there's no doubt for me.

Actually I would have given it to Nadal if he was the leader 6-5, because in that situation Federer quite often misses a forehand or so and Nadal is very strong to finish the set (except in Wimbledon's final :rolleyes: ),

but to go back from 6-5, Federer did it very often,

Nadal I don't remember many.

Voo de Mar
01-16-2009, 05:28 PM
in many of those TBs it's *5-6 and not 5-6* like the OP stated

Yeah, but for example against Moya, Nadal saved MP at 5:6*

scarecrows
01-16-2009, 05:34 PM
Yeah, but for example against Moya, Nadal saved MP at 5:6*

i was talking about your way of calculating not Nadal's record
more TBs are won after being *5-6 than 5-6*

duong
01-16-2009, 05:36 PM
in this situation Nalbandian can also be great :

he's the typical player who plays great when he's behind and poorly when he is ahead.

And he's also a great returner for this situation.

Murray I don't believe so : he's still too passive.

Voo de Mar
01-16-2009, 05:45 PM
i was talking about your way of calculating not Nadal's record
more TBs are won after being *5-6 than 5-6*

:scratch: No, from those 6 tie-breaks that Nadal won after saving set point, he didn't save set point on return only against Roddick in Davis Cup final.

elessar
01-16-2009, 05:53 PM
How about Roger's record in these situations Voo?

Voo de Mar
01-16-2009, 06:05 PM
How about Roger's record in these situations Voo?

Do you mean saving MP in the final set tie-break or tie-breaks with 5:6, 6:7 etc.? I'd like to forget about *5:6 / 5:6*

elessar
01-16-2009, 06:08 PM
Who's more clutch in TBs, better at saving SPs, I guess.

Voo de Mar
01-16-2009, 06:12 PM
Who's more clutch in TBs, better at saving SPs, I guess.

Comparing Federer and Nadal?

elessar
01-16-2009, 06:13 PM
If the answer is Roger then yes, if the answer is Rafa than I was asking you to compare all the players in the poll :D

Voo de Mar
01-16-2009, 06:21 PM
If the answer is Roger then yes, if the answer is Rafa than I was asking you to compare all the players in the poll :D

According to my memory Federer, he won definitely more tie-breaks after saving set points than Nadal but these comparisons are tricky because we can address a question: what's more important: the number of wins or the percentage of wins to defeats?
A couple days ago I wrote about the records of two players in the final set tie-break... Looking at the percentage indicator, Kohlschreiber's 9-5 is minimally better than Ferrero's 18-11 :shrug:

elessar
01-16-2009, 06:32 PM
Thanks just what I wanted to hear :rocker2:

I think the ratio is more important but people in here seemed to forget how good Roger can be at saving SPs in TBs, hell he' already saved 4 after barely one tournament :shrug:

Voo de Mar
01-16-2009, 06:44 PM
Thanks just what I wanted to hear :rocker2:

I think the ratio is more important but people in here seemed to forget how good Roger can be at saving SPs in TBs, hell he' already saved 4 after barely one tournament :shrug:

Nadal saved 9 SP's (none of them in a TB) in three matches at last year's Australian Open what's very impressive.

Igaarg
01-16-2009, 06:50 PM
Federer and then, Nadal.

elessar
01-16-2009, 06:52 PM
Roger saved 7 in two matches at the US open but in a semi and final (=way more pressure) also not in TBs that's even more impressive.

Anyway I gotta go, it's been fun :hatoff:

Andre♥
01-16-2009, 06:59 PM
Pushers like Simon or Robredo would be the correct answer.

Boredo is pretty good in this type of situations.

In a *5-6 situation, then it's Karlovic. He always end up serving an ace in this type of situations.

Voo de Mar
01-16-2009, 07:15 PM
Roger saved 7 in two matches at the US open but in a semi and final (=way more pressure) also not in TBs that's even more impressive.



Even 9 then.

PiggyGotRoasted
01-16-2009, 07:20 PM
Davydenko

Iván
01-16-2009, 07:33 PM
Im suprised Djokovic hasnt recieved more votes, a few seasons ago before he matured into a superb player he had a a brilliant FOR TB record, many of them clutch breakers too.

I think it was the season when he played mardy fish in the us open

For sure recently he has been less explosive in tight situations

Baghdatis#1
01-17-2009, 03:13 AM
I voted Hewitt by accident :o. I didn't read carefully and thought about the worst clutch player:lol:. Probably Rafa here.

TMJordan
01-17-2009, 03:14 AM
Melzer.

Henry Chinaski
01-17-2009, 03:21 AM
agree

LoveFifteen
01-17-2009, 05:23 AM
:spit: @ Gasquet being a choice.

habibko
01-17-2009, 07:37 AM
last time I remember Federer doing it was in Doha QF against Kohlschreiber where he saved set points at 6-2 6-6 (3-6*) and (4-6*) and eventually won the match 6-2 7-6(6), he does it pretty often so yeah.

FairWeatherFan
01-17-2009, 07:45 AM
In honesty I'm not sure if the thread starter is referring to the 'clutch player' being serving or receiving.

If we're talking nerves in tough situations I think we can reasonably discount Davydenko, Gasquet and Hewitt.

For returning I'd go with Nadal. For serving probably Federer. But this sort of situation comes down more to first-serve percentages, match-ups and luck really, such that it is hard to distinguish between players.

RGK
01-17-2009, 07:57 AM
In honesty I'm not sure if the thread starter is referring to the 'clutch player' being serving or receiving.

If we're talking nerves in tough situations I think we can reasonably discount Davydenko, Gasquet and Hewitt.

For returning I'd go with Nadal. For serving probably Federer. But this sort of situation comes down more to first-serve percentages, match-ups and luck really, such that it is hard to distinguish between players.
spot on.

crude oil
01-17-2009, 08:10 AM
nadal on clay
federer everywhere else

djoker after them both.

its simple.

mickymouse
01-17-2009, 08:35 AM
If it's nerves, it's probably Nadal. He forces you to come up with a winning shot in such situations.

Voo de Mar
01-17-2009, 09:49 AM
Maybe this stats would help a little bit. Top 10 players and their record in tie-breaks with at least 14 points (8-6/6-8)... main-level only:

1 Nadal, Rafael 12-14 (46 %)
2 Federer, Roger 54-30 (64 %)
3 Djokovic, Novak 14-12 (53 %)
4 Murray, Andy 7-4 (63 %)
5 Davydenko, Nikolay 23-20 (57 %)
6 Tsonga, Jo-Wilfried 6-4 (60 %)
7 Simon, Gilles 8-5 (61 %)
8 Roddick, Andy 48-34 (58 %)
9 Del Potro, Juan Martin 2-4 (33 %)
10 Blake, James 24-25 (48 %)

finishingmove
01-17-2009, 10:22 AM
the definite answer is anyone playing against nieminen.

Voo de Mar
01-17-2009, 10:32 AM
Nieminen - Nalbandian at the moment 3-6 7-6(9) 0:1...

Nieminen 24-16 (60 %)
Nalbandian 9-19 (32 %)

It helps to understand partly why Fat Dave lost that tie-break to Nieminen.

Yves.
01-17-2009, 10:33 AM
Great tie break:yeah:

Iván
01-17-2009, 12:29 PM
In honesty I'm not sure if the thread starter is referring to the 'clutch player' being serving or receiving.

If we're talking nerves in tough situations I think we can reasonably discount Davydenko, Gasquet and Hewitt.

For returning I'd go with Nadal. For serving probably Federer. But this sort of situation comes down more to first-serve percentages, match-ups and luck really, such that it is hard to distinguish between players.

Receiving, its stated in the thread title so how can i not be sure?:confused::scratch:

duong
01-17-2009, 01:09 PM
Nieminen - Nalbandian at the moment 3-6 7-6(9) 0:1...

Nieminen 24-16 (60 %)
Nalbandian 9-19 (32 %)

It helps to understand partly why Fat Dave lost that tie-break to Nieminen.


yes but he saved more than 6 set points : he choked when he served for the match, then saved 6 set points, this is very typical of him actually.

Quite often he does it too much and then loses the set ... but instead of panicking, then he wins the 3rd set. It happens very often to Nalbandian !
As somebody said, he cannot win easily.

And in the end of the set, Nieminen had a very lucky passing-shot just touching the line (they needed the hawk-eye to see it) and then a good serve.

duong
01-17-2009, 01:19 PM
If it's nerves, it's probably Nadal. He forces you to come up with a winning shot in such situations.

there are different kinds of nerves :

when you have to finish the set or the match,

or when you face a set or match point against you,

they are totally different situations on the mental point of view.
The attitudes are totally different.

Nalbandian is the best example for that : he is often great when he faces set or match points (including very nervous moments like Davis Cup) but he is very bad when he has to finish a set or a match.

As for Nadal or Federer,

I would give it to Nadal to finish the set or match,

and to Federer to save the set or match point.

Of course, it's even more obvious when Federer is serving than returning, but even for returning, I would give the edge to Federer to save that match or set point.

And Voo de Mar's statistics quite proves that too : Federer is the best at 6-6 in a tie-break, which is a moment when anyway you have to save set or match points or sometimes only finish the match when you lead 7-6.

In his carreer Federer has always been great in this situation.

I remember especially some great matches like that against Safin in the end of 2004.

But to finish the match when you lead, Nadal is the best, since quite often Federer misses some shots at that moment.

It's not only a matter of nerves actually, it's also a matter of being able not to relax when you lead :
Federer and even more Nalbandian relax a little bit, whereas Nadal no never (quite seldom he fails to finish the match, like in Wimbledon, but it was not because of relaxing but because of nerves at that moment).

Voo de Mar
01-17-2009, 01:22 PM
yes but he saved more than 6 set points : he choked when he served for the match, then saved 6 set points, this is very typical of him actually.


Saved 8 setpoints before lost the set. A couple years ago Nalbandian had similar match with Grosjean in Vienna, there was 6-4 6-7(9) 6-3 but then Nalbandian wasted 5 match points in the second, this time hadn't a single one.

Voo de Mar
01-17-2009, 01:48 PM
there are different kinds of nerves :

when you have to finish the set or the match,

or when you face a set or match point against you,

[...]

That's an interesting observetion and I agree with that. Blake generally known as a famous choker, has quite good tie-break record and wins sets after saving setpoints with similar frequency like other top players. He deals with the pressure quite well at the early stage of matches, when a set is equal or when he is close to defeat being simultaneously faraway from a win (therefore he was able to win a TB 11-9 against Federer after saving MP, what's a very good achievement because Federer is even stronger at 9:9 than at 6:6). On the other hand Blake loses concentration at easy led and can't deal with the pressure when he and his opponent are close to the end of the match, thus his 5-set record, and record in the final set tie-break are amazingly pathetic for the player of this class :help:
Safin is an interesting psychological case, because he has great 5-set record and like Blake, awful record in the final tie-breaks. I'd say it's "Russian roulette" 'cuz Safin in tight situations doesn't play with shaky hand (Blake does), I think his records would have been reverse, it's a matter of coincidence in his case.

duong
01-17-2009, 02:54 PM
That's an interesting observetion and I agree with that. Blake generally known as a famous choker, has quite good tie-break record and wins sets after saving setpoints with similar frequency like other top players. He deals with the pressure quite well at the early stage of matches, when a set is equal or when he is close to defeat being simultaneously faraway from a win (therefore he was able to win a TB 11-9 against Federer after saving MP, what's a very good achievement because Federer is even stronger at 9:9 than at 6:6). On the other hand Blake loses concentration at easy led and can't deal with the pressure when he and his opponent are close to the end of the match, thus his 5-set record, and record in the final set tie-break are amazingly pathetic for the player of this class :help:
Safin is an interesting psychological case, because he has great 5-set record and like Blake, awful record in the final tie-breaks. I'd say it's "Russian roulette" 'cuz Safin in tight situations doesn't play with shaky hand (Blake does), I think his records would have been reverse, it's a matter of coincidence in his case.


I agree about Blake especially.

I'm only a "sunday player" :lol:
but I think that when you face a set or match point, it's a matter of how determined you are and how this determination results in your game (since you have to control it) : I think Blake is quite good at that.

Also Federer has an advantage in that situation because for the other player, thinking he will beat Federer makes him think a lot becauase he's a legend, and also because the other player knows that in that situation, Federer can save the point with a great shot, then the opponent tries himself to play a great shot and sometimes misses.

When you are in front, often you lose the point because you don't keep your concentration enough : Nadal never has this problem since it seems that when he's on the court, he never gets relaxed, whereas for Federer sometimes he gets too easy, and Nalbandian too.

And of course in that situation you also have not to think about what wil happen after you have won the point and the match, and a little bit get away from your match : I think it also happens to Federer sometimes, as it happened to Nadal at least once, in the Wimbledon final last year.

The fact that Federer often wants to finish the matc with a beautiful point or an ace, is also a useless pressure for him imo, and that has made him miss some opportunities.

fast_clay
01-17-2009, 03:02 PM
Hewitt should be like -8 in this poll...

Voo de Mar
01-17-2009, 04:26 PM
Analyzing players in tight situations, I think Nieminen is worth to mention in a wider context. IMO he's the strongest mentally player outside the "first league". As I said earlier in this thread his record in at least 14-points tie-breaks is very good, he has also great 5-set record, including some epic wins (Varlet in Paris, Beck in New York... Kohlschreiber in Melbourne - it was amazing 4-setter though). I know that he realises what is his biggest weapon - perseverance, therefore he has it written with ink on the body in Finnish. He's one of those sprase guys what believes to the end, no matter how difficult is situation on the court, and it allows him often to make great comebacks, furthermore hasn't got mental breakdowns, so characteristic for example for Blake.

Ability to win a set at 9th setpoint is also an achievement (like he did today). Many players have problems to keep the concentration after wasting setpoints before a tie-break, and lose that tie-break easily, but not Nieminen, he stays positive and full concentrated. I appreciate his very good record in long tie-breaks even more - his serve isn't a big weapon, so he is under bigger pressure because he is forced to play the most important points in a tie-break running on the back of the court most of the time!

foolish pleasure
01-18-2009, 01:04 AM
pete sampras

Voo de Mar
01-18-2009, 06:19 AM
Sampras is so far the best tie-breaker in history, he won the most tie-breaks (Ivanisevic is second, Federer is going to be third in two years time) but his indicator in at least 14 points tie-break is worse than Federere's one.

Sampras: 63-50 (55 %) -> (328-194) overall
Ivanisevic: 66-44 (60 %) -> (276-207) overall
Federer: 54-30 (64 %) -> (241-127) overall

* I don't know the scorelines 25 out of 522 tie-breaks Sampras played and 22 out of 483 in Ivanisevic's case :mad:

Ivanisevic was amazing in tight tie-breaks (and is still in seniors tour) but obviously like Sampras had handicap in great serve which allows to save setpoints quickly. But the Croat has probably been the best in (11-9+) tiebreaks. He had very good risky-percentage attitude.
I mean for example he was 8:7 up in a tie-break. He was able to miss two risky shots from the baseline and at 8:9 repeated the same shot to win the point and moment later the tie-break 11-9. Moreover he was serving 1st-2nd serve saving set points (not only in a tie-break, at 4:5 & 5:6 as well) what also requires special mental attitude.
Generally watching Sampras and Ivanisevic in tight situations I've understood that in tight situations the most important is to be full-concentrated and convinced that the risk is necessary.
When you play conservative tennis in tight tie-breaks, you win 30-40 %, if you play risky tennis, you win 60-70 % of them.

nkhera1
01-18-2009, 10:13 AM
Federer

He has more margin for error in a tiebreaker because he is better at getting the ball back and getting himself into a rally on the faster surfaces. On clay I would take Nadal of course. Plus Federer is usually pretty clutch in the big points which allows him to take chances on the other person's serve. All he needs is one point off an opponents serve to win.

MsTree
01-18-2009, 10:23 AM
Your stats were very interesting Voo, would it be easy to see the tiebreak stats just for 2008? :)

Venle
01-18-2009, 10:38 AM
My pick is Rafa

feuselino
01-18-2009, 10:44 AM
Maybe this stats would help a little bit. Top 10 players and their record in tie-breaks with at least 14 points (8-6/6-8)... main-level only:

1 Nadal, Rafael 12-14 (46 %)
2 Federer, Roger 54-30 (64 %)
3 Djokovic, Novak 14-12 (53 %)
4 Murray, Andy 7-4 (63 %)
5 Davydenko, Nikolay 23-20 (57 %)
6 Tsonga, Jo-Wilfried 6-4 (60 %)
7 Simon, Gilles 8-5 (61 %)
8 Roddick, Andy 48-34 (58 %)
9 Del Potro, Juan Martin 2-4 (33 %)
10 Blake, James 24-25 (48 %)

Great stats, thanks a lot!

Interesting to see that Nadal actually has the worst record of the current top 10 if we take out Del Potro (didn't play a lot yet)...

Voo de Mar
01-18-2009, 12:51 PM
Your stats were very interesting Voo, would it be easy to see the tiebreak stats just for 2008? :)

If you mean (8-6 +) tie-breaks of the best players in 2008 it looks that:

1 Nadal, Rafael 3-3
2 Federer, Roger 7-3
3 Djokovic, Novak 4-3
4 Murray, Andy 4-2
5 Davydenko, Nikolay 2-4
6 Tsonga, Jo-Wilfried 5-1
7 Simon, Gilles 5-3
8 Roddick, Andy 2-6
9 Del Potro, Juan Martin 2-0
10 Blake, James 1-2


Interesting to see that Nadal actually has the worst record of the current top 10 if we take out Del Potro (didn't play a lot yet)...

Hard serve is very important in long tie-breaks but lack of it can be replace by other strengths (Nieminen is very good example).

MsTree
01-18-2009, 01:10 PM
If you mean (8-6 +) tie-breaks of the best players in 2008 it looks that:

1 Nadal, Rafael 3-3
2 Federer, Roger 7-3
3 Djokovic, Novak 4-3
4 Murray, Andy 4-2
5 Davydenko, Nikolay 2-4
6 Tsonga, Jo-Wilfried 5-1
7 Simon, Gilles 5-3
8 Roddick, Andy 2-6
9 Del Potro, Juan Martin 2-0
10 Blake, James 1-2

Thank you! I just wanted to see who came out on top from last year's results -
1 - Del Potro - 100%
2 - Tsonga - 83.333%
3 - Federer - 70%
4 - Murray - 66.666% :devil:
5 - Simon - 62.5%
6 - Djokovic - 57.14%
7 - Nadal - 50%
8 = Davydenko - 33.333%
8 = Blake - 33.333%
10 - Roddick - 25%