Volandri Suspended for 3 Months [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Volandri Suspended for 3 Months

VolandriFan
01-16-2009, 12:50 PM
Decision in the case of Filippo Volandri
London, England, 15 Jan 2009 - The International Tennis Federation announced today that Filippo Volandri, a 27-year-old Italian tennis player, has been found by an independent Anti-Doping Tribunal convened under the 2008 Tennis Anti-Doping Programme to have committed a Doping Offence.

The independent Tribunal found that a sample provided by Mr. Volandri on 13 March 2008 at the ATP Tour event in Indian Wells, California, USA, contained salbutamol at a concentration greater than 1,000 ng/ml. Salbutamol at such a concentration is a Prohibited Substance under the Programme, the presence of which in a player’s sample constitutes a Doping Offence unless the player can prove that its presence was due to his therapeutic use of asthma medication in accordance with an abbreviated therapeutic use exemption (an ‘ATUE’) issued under the Programme.

Mr Volandri claimed that the high concentration of salbutamol found in his sample was due to his inhalation of Ventolin (which contains salbutamol) to treat an asthma attack. He relied on an ATUE that he had been granted for use of Ventolin to treat his asthma.

The Tribunal accepted that Mr Volandri had not taken salbutamol with intent to enhance his sporting performance; rather, he had taken salbutamol to treat his asthma. However, it found that his ATUE only permitted him to use asthma medication in line with generally accepted asthma treatment guidelines, and that the amount of salbutamol he inhaled was not consistent with such use, and so could not be said to be proper therapeutic use in accordance with his ATUE. The Tribunal therefore found that a Doping Offence had been committed.

The Programme implements the World Anti-Doping Code in the sport of tennis. The changes to the Code for 2009 include treating salbutamol as a “Specified Substance”, even at a concentration greater than 1,000 ng/ml, which triggers a discretion on the part of the Tribunal as to sanction if it is satisfied the substance was not used to enhance sports performance. Applying the legal principle of “lex mitior”, the Tribunal held that Mr Volandri was entitled to the benefit of that rule change and that therefore, because it was satisfied that he had not used salbutamol with intent to enhance his performance, it had discretion as to the sanction to be imposed.

Based on its assessment of Mr Volandri’s relative fault, the Tribunal decided to impose a period of Ineligibility on Mr Volandri of three months, starting from 15 January 2009 and therefore ending at midnight on 14 April 2009.

The Tribunal also ordered that Mr Volandri’s results from Indian Wells, and from competitions that he played subsequent to 18 August 2008, should be disqualified, with the resulting forfeiture of the ranking points and repayment of the prize money that he won at those events.

A copy of the Tribunal’s full, reasoned decision can be accessed on the ITF’s website, at www.itftennis.com/antidoping. Any party wishing to appeal the decision has three weeks to do so from receipt of the written decision.
--------

Stefan Malz
01-16-2009, 12:53 PM
Yessssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss

Should be banned for life.

JolánGagó
01-16-2009, 12:57 PM
ridiculous.

Byrd
01-16-2009, 01:00 PM
The mug got mugged, expected.

Stefan Malz
01-16-2009, 01:00 PM
Should have got banned ages ago for being a dirty match fixer.

Justice.

Voo de Mar
01-16-2009, 01:02 PM
Was on juice in Rome beating Federer? :spit:

Horatio Caine
01-16-2009, 01:06 PM
As a (serious) asthma sufferer, myself, I am a little appalled by that decision, even if I don't particularly like the guy. If he wasn't attempting to enhance his performance (and I believe he was innocent in that regard), then what is the problem with taking multiple inhalations of the substance? I mean, if the asthma attack is of a more serious nature, the first few puffs often don't open the airways quick enough.


Edit:

If he wasn't attempting to enhance his performance

In fact, depending on the definition of "enhancing" one's performance, I'd argue that this is a potential factor that shouldn't have even been discussed in his case...asthma sufferers take such medication to "open up" their lungs, otherwise performance would be substantially impaired, and, in the worst cases, impossible. I don't believe that such medication could even be considered to potentially give such people an edge over others with fully-functioning lungs...instead, such medication almost allows such people to get back on a level playing field with any "normal" person.

Imo it isn't possible to compare the taking of this sort of medication to someone who takes nandralone, for instance.

Anyway, I'm not sure he deserved a suspension for this...surely not 3 months anyway.

duong
01-16-2009, 01:12 PM
All the winners of the last 16 "Tour de France" had a medical certificate because they suffered from asthma :haha:

http://www.cyclisme-dopage.com/chiffres/tdf-asthme.htm

The proportion of asthmatics among professional cyclists is incredible !

It's strange because cycling is not recommended for people who suffer from asthma :haha:

Bilbo
01-16-2009, 01:15 PM
cya pipo

Betty
01-16-2009, 01:17 PM
Pippo:o:o

Caio_Brasil
01-16-2009, 01:20 PM
Was on juice in Rome beating Federer? :spit:

This was in 2007.

Horatio Caine
01-16-2009, 01:23 PM
It's strange because cycling is not recommended for people who suffer from asthma :haha:

Well, probably not "elite" cycling, no. :lol:

But cycling, in itself, can help to strengthen the lungs, and for a more serious asthma sufferer, that isn't a bad thing.

Voo de Mar
01-16-2009, 01:24 PM
This was in 2007.

I know but the outcome of that match was sensational maybe Volandri stimulated himself somehow :aplot:

duong
01-16-2009, 01:28 PM
Well, probably not "elite" cycling, no. :lol:

But cycling, in itself, can help to strengthen the lungs, and for a more serious asthma sufferer, that isn't a bad thing.

ah yes thank you, from what I read, it's not good if the effort is too long :D

For those who read French, here's a list of the excuses which the cyclists convicted for doping have used : hilarious !

http://www.cyclisme-dopage.com/betisier/excuses.htm#Chien

like this one who helped his dog who suffered from asthma :haha:

or the one who had caught it by making love

mickymouse
01-16-2009, 01:36 PM
When I saw the headline, I thought it was for match fixing.....

alfonsojose
01-16-2009, 01:44 PM
:eek: Dopippo :ras:

VolandriFan
01-16-2009, 01:51 PM
The therapeutic use exemption Filippo received vaguely said to use the drug as necessary. In the thick of a severe asthma attack, he was expected to "seek advice on what dose was therapeutic" from the International Doping Tests and Management. "He should have known that if he felt the need to take more puffs than that limit, he should immediately call for medical help."

It all sounds pretty far-fetched if you ask me. Any GP other than an ATP doctor (who most likely would have too) would have simply told him to take as many puffs as he felt necessary, just like their own damn prescription said.

groundstroke
01-16-2009, 02:02 PM
Who honestly cares about Volandri? Apart from that Federer victory, he has done nothing to suggest he's a great tennis player.

Horatio Caine
01-16-2009, 02:13 PM
Who honestly cares about Volandri? Apart from that Federer victory, he has done nothing to suggest he's a great tennis player.

What has that got to do with the fact that Volandri might have been harshly treated? :retard:

HattonWBA
01-16-2009, 02:14 PM
These italians are a discrace, good job the best italian is Seppi

duong
01-16-2009, 02:18 PM
Do we now if he appeals the decision ?

If he appeals, then will he play in Melbourne ?

Horatio Caine
01-16-2009, 02:25 PM
Do we now if he appeals the decision ?

If he appeals, then will he play in Melbourne ?

I hope he does, and I struggle to believe that a half-decent lawyer couldn't put in a strong defence for him. :confused: Sure, rules are rules, but, in this instance, I think it is the rule that is wrong, and not the player.

I doubt a swift appeal would be enough to safeguard his place in the AO, no (not that he'd do much damage anyway :o). I'd imagine that he'd need the ruling to be overturned before he could compete any earlier than April, and such a hearing couldn't take place at the drop of a hat.

Clydey
01-16-2009, 02:28 PM
Tennis is the real loser here.

Forehander
01-16-2009, 02:41 PM
well and truly deserved. But this is not the end of it. He's not only a doping cheating prick, but also a super match fixer. Expel this guy from the tour.

maconick
01-16-2009, 02:43 PM
lmao i met him today at aus open, got a photo and all he was doing agility runs

Deivid23
01-16-2009, 03:02 PM
If he´s really innocent and he´s angry at this decision, he could very well storm back at full force fixing matches left and right after this ban :scared:

GlennMirnyi
01-16-2009, 03:23 PM
:wavey:

Doper.

shotgun
01-16-2009, 03:43 PM
Interesting suspension even if for the wrong reasons. Now they might as well suspend Davydenko for taking finasteride and Vassallo Arguello for being an annoying communist.

dylan24
01-16-2009, 03:59 PM
so he is a druggie and a fixer.
ban him for life

scoobs
01-16-2009, 04:00 PM
Ummm....okay.

I don't know what to make of this at all.

dylan24
01-16-2009, 04:01 PM
mario ancic must be happy.
he doesn't have to face this hard court legend in R1 at AO.

SwiSha
01-16-2009, 04:04 PM
get back at the ATP Pippo

come clay court season you can do what you do best, fix matches

gambit84
01-16-2009, 04:05 PM
sulbtamol...bah,

if was a real doping I could understand

btw if there are laws you have to respect

timafi
01-16-2009, 04:25 PM
good riddance mofo:mad:

duong
01-16-2009, 04:29 PM
mario ancic must be happy.
he doesn't have to face this hard court legend in R1 at AO.

yes :yeah:

he has actually been withdrawn from the draw.

but now Ancic might have to play against Malisse for instance, who gave him some difficulties last week.

ChinoRios4Ever
01-16-2009, 05:19 PM
:o

dijus
01-16-2009, 05:31 PM
When I saw the headline, I thought it was for match fixing.....

same here :D

dylan24
01-16-2009, 05:34 PM
italian will easily make up for missed income by doing what he does best when he gets back on tour.
fixing matches

FaceyFacem
01-16-2009, 05:55 PM
i have no real strong feelings about volandri, other than my general support of italians (though mainly seppi and bolelli)... but i'm really shocked how strong the opinion on the board is against him!

anyway, i think taking legal medicine is a silly reason to suspend him, but if the ATP rulebook was clear about what he had to be taking, then he should've known better. You can't just break the rules for your convenience and expect no consequences

Deboogle!.
01-16-2009, 05:59 PM
anyway, i think taking legal medicine is a silly reason to suspend him, but if the ATP rulebook was clear about what he had to be taking, then he should've known better. You can't just break the rules for your convenience and expect no consequencesExactly. this is not the first time someone's been banned for making a truly innocent mistake with a legitimate medication that happens to be a banned substance, I forget who it was but not all that long ago someone was banned simply for not having their paperwork in order. It seems silly, and in his case it sounds like it even may have been a bit of an emergency, but the rules are there.

Nathaliia
01-16-2009, 06:40 PM
Do we now if he appeals the decision ?

If he appeals, then will he play in Melbourne ?
Not like he was going to make a big score out there anyway because Junqueira was already drawn in R1 to someone else.

I agree with the voices saying it's an interesting suspension.

Lee
01-16-2009, 07:13 PM
As a (serious) asthma sufferer, myself, I am a little appalled by that decision, even if I don't particularly like the guy. If he wasn't attempting to enhance his performance (and I believe he was innocent in that regard), then what is the problem with taking multiple inhalations of the substance? I mean, if the asthma attack is of a more serious nature, the first few puffs often don't open the airways quick enough.


Edit:



In fact, depending on the definition of "enhancing" one's performance, I'd argue that this is a potential factor that shouldn't have even been discussed in his case...asthma sufferers take such medication to "open up" their lungs, otherwise performance would be substantially impaired, and, in the worst cases, impossible. I don't believe that such medication could even be considered to potentially give such people an edge over others with fully-functioning lungs...instead, such medication almost allows such people to get back on a level playing field with any "normal" person.

Imo it isn't possible to compare the taking of this sort of medication to someone who takes nandralone, for instance.

Anyway, I'm not sure he deserved a suspension for this...surely not 3 months anyway.

I agree with you. The people in the tribunal probably were not in IW last year. The condition was awful for asthma sufferer with dry air, blowing wind and sand/dust swirling on court. And when someone was having difficult time breathing, a sane person would not request the sufferer apply for proper use of medication first.

Exactly. this is not the first time someone's been banned for making a truly innocent mistake with a legitimate medication that happens to be a banned substance, I forget who it was but not all that long ago someone was banned simply for not having their paperwork in order. It seems silly, and in his case it sounds like it even may have been a bit of an emergency, but the rules are there.

I think that's Bogomolov and his problem was his paperwork expired and he forgot to file a new one. So that's different from this case.

TankingTheSet
01-16-2009, 07:21 PM
I am disappointed by the lack of intelligence and insight shown by the majority of the MTF community in this thread. I see many stupid knee-jerk reactions about Volandri being a 'doper' etc, while even the press release from the tennis authorities makes it all too clear it was a complete technicality/futility that he was busted for (they don't accuse him of doping). And to have to pay back prize money of the rest of the year is extremely unfair.

What most people fail to see is how the multi-billion dollar anti-doping industry overshot its target in the last decade and that scientific and legal principles have been thrown out of the window in the process. The people that reponded harshly in this threat are the same people that would turn a blind eye or even participate when a socially unfavoured person is liquidated or chased away in their own community for the wrong reasons, i.e. the type of person that judges before thinking and isn't interested in the true circumstances.

Baghdatis#1
01-16-2009, 07:26 PM
When I saw the headline, I thought it was for match fixing.....

Me too. It isn't a big surprise though, considering the fact that his rank dropped a lot this year.:shrug:

Mr Brightside
01-16-2009, 07:36 PM
some of the comments here are just :retard:

Cloudygirl
01-16-2009, 07:47 PM
How does salbutamol enhance performance? I take lots of it and I'm not athletic unfortunately.

Corey Feldman
01-16-2009, 09:12 PM
a sad loss IMO

PiggyGotRoasted
01-16-2009, 09:21 PM
How does salbutamol enhance performance? I take lots of it and I'm not athletic unfortunately.

I would think it would let you take in more oxygen therefore having a positive affect on your performance? duno though

Johnny Groove
01-16-2009, 09:30 PM
Total bullshit suspension

Nev
01-16-2009, 09:44 PM
Exactly. this is not the first time someone's been banned for making a truly innocent mistake with a legitimate medication that happens to be a banned substance, I forget who it was but not all that long ago someone was banned simply for not having their paperwork in order. It seems silly, and in his case it sounds like it even may have been a bit of an emergency, but the rules are there.But... three months? It sounds silly, as if the ATP has to take some dopers in the year so they can have good reputation, and confirm that the system is good.
This creates an aura of fear in the players every time they take a medication, I don't think is fair to the players who don't have great sponsors... it seems Volandri doesn't have a great image here in MTF. That means he doesn't sell, so, let's take out the boy. Also, he is italian, we have italian betters, so dopers wouldn't be a surprise, huh?

Boarder35m
01-16-2009, 09:46 PM
I don´t understand these sportsmen and women who say that they accidentially took something that is not allowed.

Unlike in other jobs where you can also work with an unfit body (illness, fractures etc.) when you do any kind of sport for a living you have to be sure that you are absolutely fit. You don´t just take anything careless and if you do you really deserve the punishment.

If I was a sportsmen I guess I would consult my doctor because of every slightest thing that´s wrong with my body and I would ask him and let me sign whether any substance I take is allowed or not.

Deboogle!.
01-16-2009, 09:59 PM
I think that's Bogomolov and his problem was his paperwork expired and he forgot to file a new one. So that's different from this case.It's different, but the ultimate point is the same - even if you have a legitimate medical condition and even if you take the medication for that condition, if you don't keep your stuff in order or if you don't get approval for what you are doing, you will face a short suspension. I'm not saying I agree with it, but, this is the way Strict Liability works.

But... three months? It sounds silly, as if the ATP has to take some dopers in the year so they can have good reputation, and confirm that the system is good.
This creates an aura of fear in the players every time they take a medication, I don't think is fair to the players who don't have great sponsors... it seems Volandri doesn't have a great image here in MTF. That means he doesn't sell, so, let's take out the boy. Also, he is italian, we have italian betters, so dopers wouldn't be a surprise, huh?Sure, it does seem ridiculous. Again, not saying I personally agree with it, was just trying to explain it :shrug:

CooCooCachoo
01-16-2009, 10:21 PM
Hmm. If he really has asthma, he is very unlucky, as ventolin does contain this ingredient. But it is also by his own neglect.

JolánGagó
01-16-2009, 11:14 PM
The whole anti doping policy is crap. Why shouldn't they take performance enhancing substances? Don't they try to have the best technology? the best food? the best coaches? The same in all sports. Only those substances that actually damage their health must be banned, all the rest should be considered legit. Cut the crap. Stop hypocrisy.

Collective
01-16-2009, 11:27 PM
Reminds me of that Futurama episode in which they mention a baseball player that made a record "before anabolics were mandatory"

smitty8
01-16-2009, 11:45 PM
I guess the next time someone has an asthma attack, they should just let them recover on their own without medication. Yeah, that works.
Anyway, when I first saw this thread, I also thought it was a suspension for something else.

TheBoiledEgg
01-17-2009, 12:04 AM
Jan-Apr is normally a 0 pointer for him anyway :spit:

he's useless on anything other than clay.

Lee
01-17-2009, 03:42 AM
It's different, but the ultimate point is the same - even if you have a legitimate medical condition and even if you take the medication for that condition, if you don't keep your stuff in order or if you don't get approval for what you are doing, you will face a short suspension. I'm not saying I agree with it, but, this is the way Strict Liability works.

I am not trying to argue with you but of the stupidity of the tribunal.

In Bogo's case, it very simple. He neglected his paper work. He had to pay the price.

In Volandri's case, the tribunal expected Volandri has the medical knowledge that how much inhalent he took will showed up in his system. I don't know if anyone in the tribunal ever used inhalent. I used it for a period of time and I was not sure each time how much medication I actually inhaled. They may have a guideline for how much medication to take, likely for normal environment but they neglected the condition on courts in Indian Wells which was extremely bad for people with breathing problems.

To me, all those on board seemed to have a stick up their ***** and can't be reasonably to apply the rule. They have very good reasons to make an exception but they chose to stick to a rule that's not quite acceptable for the situation. This will only make the doping rules a more laughable stock.

Deboogle!.
01-17-2009, 04:18 AM
I am not trying to argue with you but of the stupidity of the tribunal.

In Bogo's case, it very simple. He neglected his paper work. He had to pay the price.

In Volandri's case, the tribunal expected Volandri has the medical knowledge that how much inhalent he took will showed up in his system. I don't know if anyone in the tribunal ever used inhalent. I used it for a period of time and I was not sure each time how much medication I actually inhaled. They may have a guideline for how much medication to take, likely for normal environment but they neglected the condition on courts in Indian Wells which was extremely bad for people with breathing problems.

To me, all those on board seemed to have a stick up their ***** and can't be reasonably to apply the rule. They have very good reasons to make an exception but they chose to stick to a rule that's not quite acceptable for the situation. This will only make the doping rules a more laughable stock.I'm not disagreeing with you. All I'm saying is that it's clear that their point is: it's your body, you have the final say of what goes in it, and if you do something - ANYTHING - wrong, you will pay, whether it's paperwork, or taking too much, or not getting foreign-language ingredients translated, or whatever. As far as I can recall, the only time people were actually vindicated is when they found out that it was the ATP's own fault and that supplements they themselves handed out were contaminated. Whether it's right or wrong, they've made it very clear over the years that if it went into your body, pretty much no matter what, you are responsible for it. So yes, the tribunal expected Volandri to know how much he was allowed to use - and frankly, I don't find that base expectation that unfair. It just so happens that it sounds like poor Volandri had truly innocent motives, but I can see how someone can have a forged doctor's note for an inhaler and will use it, and will use too much, and then claim, I was having an attack and oh gee wiz, no witnesses to my attack in my hotel room and how was I supposed to know how much was allowed :angel: ....you get the point. So even if the end result in this case seems pretty unfair, I can see why it is in place and I can see why they feel that they must enforce it.

Theoretically, the goal is supposed to be to catch and discourage cheaters. In reality, they are probably just scaring these guys into not even taking vitamins for fear of inadvertently being caught. Does it actually catch a cheater or deter anyone from cheating? Probably not, and that in itself means the system is probably flawed. But the rules are the rules, at least the way they are right now. And as stupid and flawed as they may be, (it was determined that) Volandri broke them. There have been similar conversations on this board through the years (remember the guy who was using rogaine? :lol: ) and the conclusion is always the same. Clearly nothing's changed since the last time :zzz:

bjurra
01-17-2009, 06:16 AM
When I saw the headline, I thought it was for match fixing.....

So did I.

FairWeatherFan
01-17-2009, 06:38 AM
It is draconian to ban him when he had no intent to enhance his performance. He is only guilty of inadvertently taking too much medication to overcome what can be a serious medical condition...

On the other hand I predict that this ban will be overturned.

scarecrows
01-17-2009, 06:44 AM
Jan-Apr is normally a 0 pointer for him anyway :spit:

he's useless on anything other than clay.

there are 4 clay tournaments in february

and he misses Casalblanca and MC in april as well

Jedan Bjelorus
01-17-2009, 10:17 AM
The Tribunal also ordered that Mr Volandri’s results from Indian Wells, and from competitions that he played subsequent to 18 August 2008, should be disqualified, with the resulting forfeiture of the ranking points and repayment of the prize money that he won at those events.

Will he be able to use his protection rating or something ?

VolandriFan
01-17-2009, 10:32 AM
Hmm. If he really has asthma, he is very unlucky, as ventolin does contain this ingredient. But it is also by his own neglect.

He had been granted a specific exemption to use Salbutamol as he is a chronic asthma sufferer, however the ATP doctors were never clear on how many puffs would fall under "therapeutic" in his exemptions.

Filippo has been using the drug for seven years by permission and says that during Indian Wells he needed a few extra puffs than usual during a severe attack. The limit is 1000ng/l, and Filippo tested at 1120, roughly one or two puffs over that limit. He says that he has the support of his colleagues, including Nadal and Starace. He also says from experience that the drug does not enhance his performance, rather limiting it by causing fever and an elevated heart rate. Ironically, the ITF just prescribed him Budesonide, an even more powerful steriod and also prescribed twice the amount of Salbutamol.

CooCooCachoo
01-17-2009, 10:39 AM
He had been granted a specific exemption to use Salbutamol as he is a chronic asthma sufferer, however the ATP doctors were never clear on how many puffs would fall under "therapeutic" in his exemptions.

Filippo has been using the drug for seven years by permission and says that during Indian Wells he needed a few extra puffs than usual during a severe attack. The limit is 1000ng/l, and Filippo tested at 1120, roughly one or two puffs over that limit. He says that he has the support of his colleagues, including Nadal and Starace. He also says from experience that the drug does not enhance his performance, rather limiting it by causing fever and an elevated heart rate. Ironically, the ITF just prescribed him Budesonide, an even more powerful steriod and also prescribed twice the amount of Salbutamol.

OK, this is really ridiculous then. I hope the ban is overturned.

It's a rare occasion, but I wholeheartedly agree with the words TTS uttered earlier in the thread.

Horatio Caine
01-17-2009, 12:32 PM
I would think it would let you take in more oxygen therefore having a positive affect on your performance? duno though

Sure, it would have the effect of allowing you to take in more oxygen...but, importantly, that oxygen which you have been deprived of because of your condition. Imagine trying to carry out daily activities (forget about intense, physical tennis for a moment), feeling as if you are breathing through a straw...that is how a chronic asthma sufferer feels.

I honestly do not see the sense in that decision at all.

scoobs
01-17-2009, 01:31 PM
It seems like a way harsh decision to me assuming the facts are as has been reported on this thread.

alfonsojose
01-17-2009, 01:39 PM
Jealous ITF guys :p
http://www.justusboys.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=240662&d=1217936238[/QUOTE]

TankingTheSet
01-17-2009, 01:46 PM
Suppose exactly the same thing happened to a non-Italian top-20 player -- would he be banned and ordered to pay back all 2008 prize money? :shrug: (1)

It smells like a double standard.


(1) In that scenario the news would probably not even become public and it would be settled in private with communication with the player, his country's representatives and the ATP. In the current situation doping bans are highly correlated with players from countries 'unfavoured' by the ATP.

*Viva Chile*
01-17-2009, 04:10 PM
I was thinking it was for betting on matches or fixing :lol:

As an asthmatic as I am, I find the decision kinda hard, but rules are rules...

valexie03
01-17-2009, 06:27 PM
Jealous ITF guys :p
http://www.justusboys.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=240662&d=1217936238[/QUOTE]

what a cheater, he's not really a nudo ;)

Lee
01-17-2009, 11:32 PM
Will he be able to use his protection rating or something ?

No.

GlennMirnyi
01-18-2009, 04:34 AM
Dopers are dopers.

A shame the other dopers aren't punished.

Raquel
01-18-2009, 03:59 PM
He had been granted a specific exemption to use Salbutamol as he is a chronic asthma sufferer, however the ATP doctors were never clear on how many puffs would fall under "therapeutic" in his exemptions.

Filippo has been using the drug for seven years by permission and says that during Indian Wells he needed a few extra puffs than usual during a severe attack. The limit is 1000ng/l, and Filippo tested at 1120, roughly one or two puffs over that limit. He says that he has the support of his colleagues, including Nadal and Starace. He also says from experience that the drug does not enhance his performance, rather limiting it by causing fever and an elevated heart rate. Ironically, the ITF just prescribed him Budesonide, an even more powerful steriod and also prescribed twice the amount of Salbutamol.
What a strange decision given they recently prescribed him an even more powerful steroid :confused: And if we are talking one of two puffs over the limit, I think this seems very harsh. I don't seem to remember Volandri being involved or linked with some of the other bans the Italian players have received in the past. Was he? There seems to be a lot of bad feeling for him.

Labamba
03-31-2009, 10:47 AM
Volandri won in court, TAS removed his ban and he can return to action next Monday. The ATP will have to give back the points and money taken from Pippo.

According to TAS, the ITF was too severe in the sanction to Volandri, that at the utmost deserved a warning.

source: tennisteen.it

very shady from the ITF :o they couldn't nail him for fixing, so they gave this harsh ban

Har-Tru
03-31-2009, 11:10 AM
not fair if what's being said here is true

rhinooooo
03-31-2009, 11:37 AM
Tennis institution in crap decision shocker...

What a surprise.

Jelena
03-31-2009, 11:59 AM
Volandri won in court, TAS removed his ban and he can return to action next Monday. The ATP will have to give back the points and money taken from Pippo.

According to TAS, the ITF was too severe in the sanction to Volandri, that at the utmost deserved a warning.

source: tennisteen.it

very shady from the ITF :o they couldn't nail him for fixing, so they gave this harsh ban
I'd like to see as source to the news the CAS. I was on the site of CAS and didn't find anything there. :shrug:

miura
03-31-2009, 12:02 PM
It's just 3 months anyway. It's good that they set an example and punish so less people will be tempted by the idea.

alfonsojose
03-31-2009, 02:23 PM
Tennis player Volandri’s 3-month doping ban lifted :D
http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/news;_ylt=AjqFGPnzWG2pJDpC0jFMSxY4v7YF?slug=ap-doping-volandri&prov=ap&type=lgns
"Someone made a mistake and will pay for it,” he said.
:armed: :yeah:

miura
03-31-2009, 02:33 PM
Tennis player Volandri’s 3-month doping ban lifted :D
http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/news;_ylt=AjqFGPnzWG2pJDpC0jFMSxY4v7YF?slug=ap-doping-volandri&prov=ap&type=lgns
"Someone made a mistake and will pay for it,” he said.
:armed: :yeah:
Good for him, the clay season is about to start aswell.

Mr Brightside
03-31-2009, 08:11 PM
:d

bobbynorwich
04-01-2009, 01:33 AM
Allegations of match fixing? How much effect could a player ranked 161 have on a tournament .... maybe his own R1 loss.

OddJob
04-01-2009, 02:11 AM
I'm glad to have him back!:hug:

Horatio Caine
04-01-2009, 07:49 AM
Volandri won in court, TAS removed his ban and he can return to action next Monday. The ATP will have to give back the points and money taken from Pippo.

According to TAS, the ITF was too severe in the sanction to Volandri, that at the utmost deserved a warning.

source: tennisteen.it

very shady from the ITF :o they couldn't nail him for fixing, so they gave this harsh ban

Like I said, he would have had a strong case (because the ITF's decision to suspend was atrocious)...had he failed, his lawyer shouldn't be practicing law. :o :rolleyes:

ITF/ATP are making a number of avoidable mistakes these days.

Anyway, hopefully Volandri was doing something productive during his suspension. :tape:

jayjay
04-01-2009, 01:26 PM
Interesting suspension even if for the wrong reasons. Now they might as well suspend Davydenko for taking finasteride and Vassallo Arguello for being an annoying communist.

:lol:

Henry Chinaski
04-01-2009, 02:11 PM
Allegations of match fixing? How much effect could a player ranked 161 have on a tournament .... maybe his own R1 loss.

did you start watching tennis yesterday?

Andre♥
04-01-2009, 03:54 PM
Allegations of match fixing? How much effect could a player ranked 161 have on a tournament .... maybe his own R1 loss.

:retard:

Do you get Volandri was inside the Top 30 like... one year ago?

r2473
04-01-2009, 03:54 PM
ah yes thank you, from what I read, it's not good if the effort is too long :D

For those who read French, here's a list of the excuses which the cyclists convicted for doping have used : hilarious !

http://www.cyclisme-dopage.com/betisier/excuses.htm#Chien

like this one who helped his dog who suffered from asthma :haha:

or the one who had caught it by making love

Judge Smails: Spaulding, get dressed you're playing golf.
Spalding Smails: No I'm not grandpa I'm playing tennis.
Judge Smails: You're playing golf and you're going to like it.
Spalding Smails: What about my asthma?
Judge Smails: I'll give you asthma.

littleash
04-02-2009, 12:10 AM
Italian player :o