Gaston News, Information & Articles (Exhibition Matches as well) [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Gaston News, Information & Articles (Exhibition Matches as well)

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chelsea
06-03-2004, 03:36 AM
Textbook Gaudio into first semi final
By Nyree Epplett
Wednesday, June 2, 2004

Gaston Gaudio’s backhand is made of the stuff you find in textbooks. Honed on the slow clay courts of Buenos Aires, it slides off his racquet and skims down the line or rolls across court and disappears into thin air.

And on Court Suzanne Lenglen Wednesday, it laid the groundwork for the demise of former World No1 Lleyton Hewitt.

“Like Sampras served like that, I play my backhand like that,” explained the wily Argentine who routinely disposed of the Aussie 12th seed in straight sets 6-3 6-2 6-2 to move into his first ever Grand Slam semi final.

It was the unseeded Gaudio’s most stunning victory of the tournament to date. Hewitt, a two-time Grand Slam singles champion, simply failed to find the answers to the exceptional claycourt prowess of his opponent, and was blown away by the gloriously fluid one-handed stroke.

“His backhand is one of the best single-handed backhands out there,” lamented Hewitt. "I tried hanging in there and I tried a few different things...

"His defense was so good. He didn't give me a lot of chances to attack. He's a class player on this surface.”

Enroute to his historic victory, Gaudio reveled in the cool and blustery conditions, controlling the dual from the outset with a near flawless display of superior shotmaking. He made just 19 unforced errors to Hewitt's 43 and broke the Aussie seven times.

“I’m especially happy because I played much better than the other day. I knew if I kept focused, particularly at the key times, that I would be able to win,” said Gaudio, adding that he would have laughed off the notion of making the Roland Garros final one month ago. His previous best at a Grand Slam came two years ago here, when he reached the fourth round.

“You gonna be kidding. That’s impossible!” said Gaudio, who has been forced to revise his original goal of making it to the second week here. “And now to win the tournament like a dream, I was dreaming about it,” said the 25-year-old.

Hewitt struggled to get as much depth or bite on his shot as the Argentine, and rarely strung together enough points to bother the Gaudio from the backcourt. His flat, counter-punching style played right into the hands of the 44-ranked Argentine. He kept the Aussie scampering with his heavily angled balls, and succession of glorious drop shots. He threaded his near-perfect one-handed topspin backhand down the line and cross court over and over again to frustrate Hewitt.

Hewitt broke the steady Gaudio just twice, in the first game of the match (Gaudio broke straight back to love, 1-1) and then again in the fourth game of the third set.

At 3-3 and 40-0 on serve in the first set, the 12th seed looked like he might make a match of it. But four consecutive errors, including a sitter backhand at the net, and a shaky double fault sealed his fate, and he floated a backhand long to hand Gaudio a 4-2 lead. Hewitt missed a break point at 30-40 in the next game when the Argentine played a precise drop shot and upped the velocity on his serve and groundstrokes.

“I thought I could have been a little more nervous but in fact I was not all,” said the Argentine, who won 20 of 21 points at the net. “I’m not used to go so much to the net,” he chuckled.

Gaudio ran all over the Aussie in the second set, racing to a 5-1 lead before the Aussie had time to blink.

Hewitt staged a minor resurgence of sorts in the third, but it was too little and too late, and the Argentine broke the Aussie one more time in the seventh game (5-2). He won the contest on his next serve when a Hewitt forehand floated wide.

It is the second time in nearly as many weeks that Gaudio has beaten Hewitt, after inflicting a three-set defeat at the World Team Cup.

Gaudio was one of four Argentines to advance to the quarter finals at Roland Garros (a new Grand Slam record for the nation). He now meets the winner of the Gustavo Kuerten v David Nalbandian quarter final in a match he compares to the final of the first division Spanish soccer league.

“They’re (Nalbandian and Kuerten) the Galacticos (Real Madrid) and I’m the Valencia. They have a special talent and in the top 10.”

Source: www.rolandgarros.com

chelsea
06-03-2004, 03:50 AM
Open-Modest Gaudio joins Argentine Galacticos
Wed 2 June, 2004 17:40

By Francois Thomazeau

PARIS, June 2 (Reuters) - Modest claycourt specialist Gaston Gaudio eased into the French Open semi-finals on Wednesday but claimed to be no more than an underdog among the Argentine "Galacticos".

The only unseeded player left in the quarter-finals destroyed former world number one Lleyton Hewitt 6-3 6-2 6-2 to join fellow Argentines Guillermo Coria and David Nalbandian in the last four.

Despite the achievement, Gaudio, ranked 44th in the world, insisted he was still a long way behind his two compatriots.

"They are the geniuses. They're the Galacticos and I am Valencia", he said in a comparison with the Spanish soccer Liga.

Galacticos was the nickname given to star-studded Real Madrid squad this season.

"I think they have a special talent. They're incredible. They're in the top 10. I would be happy if they won the tournament", he said.

But if Gaudio took the comparison to its logical conclusion, he could well win the tournament since Valencia ended up Spanish champions while Real Madrid faltered.

Gaudio did not rule out the possibility.

"To win the tournament would be like a dream. When I was a kid, I was dreaming about it. Now I'm in the semi-finals, but I have to wait. It's going to be tough," he said.

Gaudio now meets Nalbandian, the player he admires most on the circuit.

HIDING AMBITIONS

"Nalbandian can play well anywhere. (Swiss world number one Roger) Federer is also a genius but I like David more, really," the 25-year-old said.

But Gaudio might well be hiding his real ambitions behind his modesty.

Gaudio, who won two tournaments in 2002 in Barcelona and Mallorca, was the brightest hope of Argentine tennis before Coria and Nalbandian came along.

While Coria and Nalbandian received financial support from their tennis association, Gaudio and other Argentine players were left to fend for themselves.

"Sometimes there was no money to travel or we had to cancel a tour. Sometimes you had to stay in Europe for an extra month to wait for the next tournament.

"They (Nalbandian and Coria) received support and of course that was very important for them.

"Well I'm not going to judge that. We each followed a different path," he said.

But his semi-final on Friday would be a way to claim his share back.

Source: www.reuters.co.uk

chelsea
06-03-2004, 03:54 AM
Gaudio conquers his demons
From correspondents in Paris
June 3, 2004

GASTON GAUDIO has finally managed to tame the demons which have hampered his progress.

And the self-effacing 25-year-old from Buenos Aires, who booked his first Grand Slam semi-final at the sixth time of asking with victory over Lleyton Hewitt, revealed his on-court battles with himself have often proved more energy-consuming than his opponents, and driven him to long sessions in the psychologist's chair.

But there were few signs of nerves as Gaudio demolished Hewitt in straight sets to advance to an all-Argentine semi-final with David Nalbandian.

His performance over the past week has led unseeded Gaudio to jump from 34th position in the Champions Race to at least 19th when the tournament ends.

And the man who won both his previous titles on clay at Barcelona and Mallorca two years ago, puts his improved form down to a new mental approach.

"Before I was having a really tough time on court, so sometimes I was saying 'what am I doing this for if I'm having such a hard time?'," said Gaudio whose previous Grand Slam best was a fourth round here two years ago.

"But that's what I've been working on with my phychologist so that I can enjoy things more.

"Very often when I'm on the court I want to go home and not play anymore. Sometimes I was having a hard time for different reasons. I think that showed on the court, and it showed in my tennis. I was trying to change that."

A record three Argentines have made it to the final four for the first time as they bid to bring home their first trophy since Guillermo Vilas won the men's title in 1977.

And Gaudio puts their determination and his new mental strength down to the financial crisis in their debt-ridden South American homeland.

"Sometimes you had to stay in Europe for an extra month to wait for the next tournament. We couldn't go back home because we couldn't pay the airfare.

"Of course this means you suffer more than you usually would. That has a price. It's very difficult to reach the level we have now."

As for his chances of the title, Gaudio believes he is the underdog compared to third seed Guillermo Coria, who takes on English outsider Tim Henman, the ninth seed, in the final four, and Nalbandian, the eighth seed.

"I see things from the outside, just as you do. I think they have a special talent. They're incredible. They're in the top 10. They really have something in them. I don't know whether things were easier for them from the outset. I don't know what it was that caused that. But I think they're level is better.

"They're the Galactico (Real Madrid stars) and I'm the Valencia," he said referring to Spanish soccer. "I'm just asking for one title, not two."

Agence France-Presse

Source: www.foxsports.news.com.au

chelsea
06-03-2004, 04:13 AM
2000 MONTE CARLO OPEN

April 21, 2000

G. GAUDIO/ JC Ferrero

6-4, 6-2

An Interview With:

GASTON GAUDIO

Q. Your name, is it from an Italian origin or Spanish origin?

GASTON GAUDIO: My mother is from Spanish origin and my father, I think, is Italian.

Q. But you think; you are not sure?

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, we live in Argentina so I don't know.

Q. What about your grandfather?

GASTON GAUDIO: The same. He born in Argentina. I don't really don't know where the surname comes.

Q. What do you think, if anything, are you missing to be a Top-10 player? Is it just experience or there are parts of your game that you still are lacking?

GASTON GAUDIO: I suppose that I have to get better my serve and I get to put a little bit stronger. Then the rest going to be confidence and experience.

Q. Can you tell us how you became a professional tennis player, where and when did you start playing tennis? How did it happen?

GASTON GAUDIO: I start because my brother starts playing tennis before and I was following him to every club he goes and I was following him. Then he didn't play anymore and then I continued playing and doing better than him.

Q. Where was it?

GASTON GAUDIO: In Buenos Aires.

Q. He made many mistakes?

GASTON GAUDIO: I don't know if he played at his level he was playing until now. The first set could have been both sides, but the second set I think he started becoming tired and I started playing my game and then it was good for me.

Q. You say you "Played your game." What is your game?

GASTON GAUDIO: Running.

Q. No?

GASTON GAUDIO: Yes, I run a lot. I hit very hard. My backhand is very good. It is better than my drive and my forehand. With my forehand I try to put the ball in. But with my backhand I have a better shot in my backhand.

Q. Why and when did you decide to change your coach, a few weeks ago?

GASTON GAUDIO: Yes, I think it was in Bogota, the ATP Tour in Bogota. I was training with him since three years, but we split, finished.

Q. Why?

GASTON GAUDIO: Percentage decisions from both sides. Nothing else.

Q. Why did you choose Horacio as a coach?

GASTON GAUDIO: I was practicing with him before when I was young, when I was 15, I started with him and then we finished because I have problems with other things because he was too busy and we couldn't travel around the world with me. Now we are together again.

Q. Is it the same relationship with a coach than you can have with a fiancee, a girlfriend?

GASTON GAUDIO: It is the same thing.

Q. But I am being serious.

GASTON GAUDIO: But me too. You have to have a special feeling with your coach. You can't choose any kind of coach just because he is good. If you don't have -- if you don't trust him then it doesn't work. So it is the same thing.

Q. Can you travel three people, coach, plus girlfriend, plus you?

GASTON GAUDIO: It is difficult. Horacio don't like it. But one week now and then it is nice.

Q. Which part of the game do you think you improved the most since a few weeks or few months?

GASTON GAUDIO: I think that it is not in my tennis. I think it is in my concentration, to put everything of me. With Horacio only, he is a very tough guy so we try to put my best; sometimes I was very lazy sometimes.

Q. Is it a big surprise for you to be in the semis here?

GASTON GAUDIO: Why for me it --

Q. Is it a big surprise for you?

GASTON GAUDIO: For me and for everybody it is a surprise. Nobody thinks that I am going to get into the semifinals but we are working for that. If we get it, good. If not, we try it the next week.

Q. Look like there is more and more new players in Argentina since a few months. Are you very close friends together?

GASTON GAUDIO: Yes.

Q. Travel together?

GASTON GAUDIO: Yes.

Q. Can you explain us about --

GASTON GAUDIO: Last year the Argentinian guys maybe they fight each other so many times. But now, no, we are very friends and we are travelling all together and we are getting better like that.

Q. Who are your best friends, Argentinian players?

GASTON GAUDIO: I don't have -- it is the same. With Gumi and Zabaleta and Squillara it is good.

Q. If you have all those friends who is your enemy on the circuit?

GASTON GAUDIO: I don't have any enemy. I don't care about the ones that I don't want.

Q. What are you doing the rest of the day apart from tennis?

GASTON GAUDIO: I am on the net all the day long talking my friends and my mother and everything. I am always with a computer.

Q. What is your next big goal, to win a tournament?

GASTON GAUDIO: To win this one. And then the next one. Every week it is the same.

Q. What does it mean for you Argentinian champions, such as Vilas, does it mean something to you?

GASTON GAUDIO: No, that was a long time ago, now our only person is Zabaleta that is getting the best ranking of us. Vilas is an idol there in Argentina, but now not anymore.

Q. Do you know him personally?

GASTON GAUDIO: Yes.

Q. Did he give you some advice sometimes?

GASTON GAUDIO: Yes, we were friends three years ago, I was practicing in the same club than him. But yes he helped me so many times. I have to appreciate the things he do for me.

Q. For instance, what did he tell you?

GASTON GAUDIO: The same things that they tell you as a coach. He so much experience, so he try to help me sometimes.

End of FastScripts….

chelsea
06-03-2004, 04:14 AM
THE MASTERS SERIES 2001
THE ERICSSON OPEN

MIAMI, FLORIDA

March 25, 2001

G. Gaudio/Y. Kafelnikov
6-4, 6-1

An Interview With:

GASTON GAUDIO

THE MODERATOR: Questions first in English.

Q. Was that one of your biggest wins of your career?

GASTON GAUDIO: I answer in Spanish?

THE MODERATOR: If you can do it in English.

GASTON GAUDIO: I'm gonna try. I hope that yes, is the first time that I beat a Top 10 I guess. So I'm here in Ericsson, it's really good for me to be here. I beat Kafelnikov and I'm really happy because of that.

Q. Did you think he was at his best today? Was it more his mistakes or your good play?

GASTON GAUDIO: I think that it's both. He didn't play so good, and I play a good match. But of course he didn't play so good that he usually play. So was better for me.

Q. Did you think you frustrated him by getting a lot of balls back?

GASTON GAUDIO: Yes. I mean, is the way that I play, so that is the best thing that I am usually does. So maybe he get frustrated, like you said, but I play a good match so that is important for me.

Q. Sometimes they say Yevgeny suddenly loses interest out there maybe. Did you detect that today at all, that he seemed like, "I don't care"?

GASTON GAUDIO: Yes, maybe in the second set he started to play not so good like in the first. So yes, I start to feel that in the second.

Q. When you see that, you're on the other side of the net and you see that, does that make you more confident or does that make you think like, "What's the story with this guy? He's not even trying."

GASTON GAUDIO: I mean, I don't care what he did in the -- during the match. The only thing that I want is to win the match, so I was watching him but he was like tanking, you know, in the second set. But the important thing was to win the match, so...

Q. Your best results have been on the clay. Is this maybe the best hardcourt tournament for you?

GASTON GAUDIO: Yes, maybe yes. I play good in Oakland, too. I reach into the semifinals. But here of course is more important tournament, so... And also I beat Kafelnikov so that is really important for me.

End of FastScripts....

chelsea
06-03-2004, 04:14 AM
2002 NASDAQ-100 OPEN
KEY BISCAYNE, FLORIDA

March 24, 2002

G. GAUDIO/S. Grosjean
7-6, 4-6, 6-1

An Interview With:

GASTON GAUDIO

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. Can you tell us about your match today.

GASTON GAUDIO: It was pretty tough, the match. I was playing really good. It was a very close match. I was lucky in the third set. That's why I finish the third set pretty easy.

Q. But the first two sets were a little tighter. He could have even beaten you in two sets.

GASTON GAUDIO: Yeah, I was lucky in the first two sets because I was 6-3 down in the tiebreak. And, I don't know, he made a few mistakes and that's why I could finish the first set pretty tough. And then in the third, I start 3-love and that was the difference.

Q. And your next match against a friend and a fellow countryman (Chela), how do you feel about that?

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, playing against a friend, so it's pretty difficult. But we are professionals and we have to play as best as we can. And, well, gonna be better for Argentina because they're going to have someone in the quarterfinals.

Q. And maybe you can talk to us about the beginning of the season. You started pretty strong on hardcourts in Davis Cup.

GASTON GAUDIO: Yeah. I was playing pretty good, but I was injured. After Davis Cup I got injured and I couldn't play after Davis Cup. Well, I'm back and I start to play again in Indian Wells. And, well, I started playing good again.

End of FastScripts….

chelsea
06-03-2004, 04:15 AM
2003 WESTERN & SOUTHERN FINANCIAL GROUP MASTERS
CINCINNATI, OHIO

August 13, 2003

G. GAUDIO/J.C. Ferrero
6-7, 7-6, 6-4

GASTON GAUDIO

MODERATOR: Questions for Gaston.

Q. So you like it here then?

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, I like to play over here. I really enjoy this tournament. We have everything. We have the golf there, I love to play golf. So I feel okay in here.

Q. He seems to have had trouble with you in the past, although he won the last few. What do you think it is about your game that gives him problems?

GASTON GAUDIO: No, we used to make always tough matches when we play each other. The last three, I guess, he won, but I was pretty close when I lost in Monte-Carlo and I lost in Roma. Like I told you, we used to play like always tough matches, and it's so close, it could be for one or for the other.

Q. Is there something about his game that you find...?

GASTON GAUDIO: I don't know why. Maybe because we know each other since like we were young. So every time that we play against, you know, it's like we know each other so much. So there's always tough matches.

Q. Why was today good for you? Why did it work for you?

GASTON GAUDIO: I was a little bit lucky when he was serving in the third set 5-4, that he made an easy mistake in the first point of the game. Then I make a good return, and I was like Love-40 in two seconds. So I was lucky that game. It was so close that, I mean, was that, you know, the last game was everything.

Q. Can you talk about Argentine tennis. There's so many players doing so well right now. Do you have any idea why that is, or how so many of you have come together at the same time?

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, actually, I really don't know what happened. We're playing very good everyone. I think that maybe because one is getting to the final in a big tournament like that. Last week, the other one is thinking, "If he's doing that, maybe I can do it either." So it's like a kind of a -- one player motivates the other one, you know? It's like kind of that I guess.

Q. Why all at the same time? You had Vilas and Clerc, then there was really no one.

GASTON GAUDIO: Yeah, there was -- yeah, Mancini. But after that ones, there didn't come anyone. But now there are like, I don't know, 10 players that are playing unbelievable. Is always happen the same. It's like between one and the other was like 10 years, you know. After Mancini, Jaite, and all that ones, no one comes. Now there's getting someone new, I don't know why.

Q. Is that because more people are into soccer?

GASTON GAUDIO: I really don't know. Because from the tennis federation in Argentina, we don't get anything so it's not because of them.

Q. How old are you?

GASTON GAUDIO: 24.

Q. Did Vilas or Clerc have any involvement with any of you guys?

GASTON GAUDIO: No.

Q. Encouragement even?

GASTON GAUDIO: No, he used to come over, practice in Buenos Aires. Yeah, he used to say - I don't know - he'd teach us some things, some kind of experience that he had, but not much.

Q. That's Vilas or Clerc?

GASTON GAUDIO: Vilas. Clerc I think is living here in Miami.

Q. Soccer is still the number one game in your country. How much behind is tennis right now?

GASTON GAUDIO: Yeah, I think that soccer is gonna be always the first sport in our country, and then maybe tennis is coming up.

Q. As a second sport?

GASTON GAUDIO: Yeah. As popular, no.

Q. The people back home, have you noticed people getting more and more excited about what you're doing, what the other Argentines are doing?

GASTON GAUDIO: Yeah, of course. Everybody is playing so good that the people there in Argentina are getting, you know, like still following us, of course. Coria is gonna get into the Masters maybe. People, they're really behind that.

Q. Is it to the point where, you know, you can't go out in public anymore because everyone knows who you are?

GASTON GAUDIO: No, not like that. We can still going out and all that.

Q. Can you talk about the next round against Robby.

GASTON GAUDIO: I really don't know him so much because we never play against each other. But I know he's playing unbelievable good here in this surface, and it's gonna be tough for sure.

Q. What can you envision for your next major goal? What do you want to try to accomplish next?

GASTON GAUDIO: I would love to win like first a Masters Series - of course on clay because here it's gonna be difficult for me, but I will try to. And then my dream is like winning the French Open.

End of FastScripts….

chelsea
06-03-2004, 04:15 AM
2003 US OPEN – A USTA EVENT
NEW YORK CITY

August 27, 2003

N. MASSU/G. Gaudio
6-3, 6-3, 6-2

GASTON GAUDIO

MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. I know this is a tough loss, but Argentina is obviously playing tremendous tennis right now. I'm wondering from your side, why is that?

GASTON GAUDIO: Actually, I really don't know. They are playing good. I don't know why. Maybe because one is playing so good, you know, that makes that the other ones trust in that they can do it themselves.

Q. You were one of the first to really, in this new wave, to start playing.

GASTON GAUDIO: I was behind Squillari first. So I'm making like a roll the dice, you know? The dice is rolling.

Q. But it's not just on clay courts; it's hard courts as well, the Masters Series?

GASTON GAUDIO: Not for me, huh?

Q. Not for you here. What is the answer? Is it the camaraderie? Everybody's friends, like the Spaniards were, and they started playing so well.

GASTON GAUDIO: Maybe, I don't know. Maybe that. Yeah, we are pretty good friends, you know. We used to go out every day, having dinner together. That's make it easy to travel around, to be with your friends.

End of FastScripts….

chelsea
06-03-2004, 04:24 AM
Roland Garros
Paris
May 31 2004

G. Gaudio/I. Andreev
6-4, 7-5, 6-3

Q. You've had a couple of close matches with Lleyton Hewitt in the past. How do you see the quarterfinal going?

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, it's gonna be like the other one. It's gonna be tough, for sure. I never played against him with five sets, but in a quarterfinals of a Grand Slam, sure it's gonna be tough.

Q. Have you followed his progress here? He's probably in the best clay court form he's been in his career. Will he be more dangerous here than he's been in previous years?

GASTON GAUDIO: Yeah, I think so. He never reached the quarterfinals I guess.

Q. Once before.

GASTON GAUDIO: Once? Yeah, I played last week in Dusseldorf. Yeah, he was playing pretty good. It's gonna be, like I told you, it's gonna be tough.

Q. Would you have predicted that four Argentines would make it to the quarterfinals? Are you surprised? What can you say about that?

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, it's great. I never thought this could happen. To be four Argentines in the quarterfinals is like pretty good. Maybe we can reach the semifinals, I don't know. We'll see. I hope so.

THE MODERATOR: Spanish questions, please.

Q. What does it mean for you having come to the quarterfinals, especially in Roland Garros? What did you feel today coming in to the quarterfinals?

GASTON GAUDIO: This is the tournament that I most like. I hope to go on. I'm very happy. I was close to winning two years ago and then I let it go, so I was a bit disappointed.

But I hope to take advantage of the fact that it's always been a dream of mine to play well here. I am very happy, and I hope that this dream will come true that I had as a boy.

Q. You were more enthusiastic during the game. You were talking to David and to Fernando and to your trainer. How are you feeling in order to face what is still ahead of you?

GASTON GAUDIO: I am very happy. I'm well, I'm playing well. Perhaps I was a bit tense today, more than before. But I think overall well.

I was trying to analyze the games as I usually do, not more than usual. And whatever is to come now, I may be a bit more nervous because I'm coming into quarterfinals. The other players are also a bit more tense.

There's a greater degree of nervousness around than in previous games, for the quarterfinals.

Q. Did playing Hewitt in Dusseldorf help you in preparing for Roland Garros?

GASTON GAUDIO: Yeah, that helps. The possibility of hanging on against a player like this, it gives you greater confidence. It allowed me to come here in greater preparation.

Q. How were you training before coming here? Did you change anything in your preparation or training?

GASTON GAUDIO: No, I had been playing as I've always done. I was training to come here and there's nothing that I had changed. I was playing well.

Q. Are you playing match by match, or are you having greater expectations because of the quarterfinals for the end?

GASTON GAUDIO: Yes, of course. When you reach the quarterfinals, there are only eight players left and all of them wish to win. So you're in a position where everybody's out to get the same thing, has the same goal.

It's just a question of playing the next match against Hewitt.

Q. You said that you have to take advantage of this because this may be one of your last Roland Garros. At what point in your career do you think that you are? Are you in the final phase?

GASTON GAUDIO: No, not in the final phase. It's just that I played here for the first time in '96, and I don't really know if I'll be playing when I am over 30 years of age, so there's not that much time left. You have to take advantage of each time you come here.

Q. But in the case of Nalbandian and Coria, they received support from the federation, but Canas and some of the other players had to train for tennis on their own. How much does that cost? What is the total tally for all the sacrifices you had to make in order to train for tennis?

GASTON GAUDIO: You always think when things go well at this point in the game, so many years have gone by, that I think that Guillermo and the others who were helped can't really remember that they were helped. I don't think this changes anything.

We knew that many sacrifices had to be made even when we were youngsters. So of course it makes us conscious of what has happened.

Q. What were your aspirations when you were young?

GASTON GAUDIO: The same aspirations as any youngster - being able to win the different matches and coming out ahead, as I am here. There are only two more matches to be played, for instance, at this time.

Q. How did you begin to play tennis? You played rugby before?

GASTON GAUDIO: No, when I was in school I played soccer, but I began to play tennis because of my brother. He was a player so I just followed in his footsteps.

Q. What is your brother's name?

GASTON GAUDIO: Diego.

chelsea
06-03-2004, 04:27 AM
Roland Garros
Paris
June 2 2004

G. Gaudio/L. Hewitt
6-3, 6-2, 6-2

Q. How do you feel?

GASTON GAUDIO: I'm very pleased. It was the first time I was in a quarterfinal of a Grand Slam tournament. But I'm especially happy because I played much better than the other day against Andreev, where I was very nervous.

Today, well, I'm very pleased, and I hope I'm going to continue to enjoy this.

Q. (No microphone)?

GASTON GAUDIO: We knew more or less what this match was going to look like. Sometimes some matches are very even in terms of the players. I knew that if I remained focused and if I didn't lose my concentration, in particular in key times, I would really be able to win this match.

Q. Can you say that you're gaining confidence, that you see yourself as a winner? You played very good matches, in particular the match against Enqvist, and today you were at a very good level.

GASTON GAUDIO: Yes, my confidence is increasing. Even though I was in the quarterfinals, I was still feeling confident. I started this tournament with a very tough match. I felt that I was playing well.

Of course, with experience, you realize that some things that you paid great attention and importance to are not that important, and you can just relax and enjoy yourself more.

Q. When you were interviewed for television, you said that it was a childhood dream to win the French Open. Do you think this dream can now become true?>

GASTON GAUDIO: Yes, of course. Everything is possible. But, we have David, Guga, Henman, Coria, who are all wonderful players. So, obviously, it's going to be very difficult. And they all want to win.

It's going to be a real battle.

Q. (No microphone)?

GASTON GAUDIO: Every time we started a match, you worried about how you were going to play, make sure you hit the ball perfectly, all the points were perfect, and you started worrying a few days before the match.

Now, I'm still nervous, but at least I know what to expect. That's a real advantage. I'm making the most of it and I'm trying to enjoy things a little bit more. I'm playing on center court with lots of people watching. I try to enjoy that.

Even if I'm still nervous, even if it can be a complicated match, I try to enjoy it and have a good time. That really helps, I think.

Q. A colleague told me that after the match with Enqvist, you thought about retiring because you were not enjoying yourself, which is the opposite of what you just said. When did things start changing? Why did you suddenly feel more relaxed?>

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, no, I didn't really want to withdraw. That was not at all the case. But before I was really having a tough time on the court, so sometimes I was saying, "What am I doing this for if I'm having such a hard time?"

But that's what I've been working on with my psychologist, so that I can enjoy things more, what I experience on court, just trying to enjoy things more.

Very often, as I said the other day, sometimes when I'm on the court, I want to go home and not play anymore. That's a normal reaction as a player. Sometimes you want to withdraw and give everything up.

But it's not the case that I want to withdraw. Sometimes things go through your mind, but then you're back on the court and you try to enjoy yourself.

Q. It seems like you're not suffering today, that you're enjoying yourself. Do you want to continue playing like that?

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, yes, when I started the press conference, I said in such a situation I could have been a little more nervous. I'm in the quarterfinal of a Grand Slam event. I thought I was going to be nervous. But, in fact, not at all. Things turned out really well for me.

Q. Is this the match that you enjoyed the most during the French Open?

[Still question] GASTON GAUDIO: As a person, as a tennis player, this week, this past week, these past months, have they been the best for you in your career as a tennis player?

GASTON GAUDIO: It just depends on the day. Sometimes I'm feeling really great, and sometimes I'm feeling rock bottom. But there have been more days I've enjoyed than days that I haven't, so I think things are improving.

Q. Feeling better on the court, is that something that is surprising you, or did you think you could achieve this feeling during the French Open?

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, on and off the court it's the same really. Sometimes I'm at a tournament and I don't feel, you know, in top form. But it's more, you know, what happens around me than the moment when I go on the court. These days, I've really enjoyed. Because of the tennis, I'm having a good time. I think as a whole, it's the context.

Q. Before you started this tournament, did you think you were going to enjoy things, that you were going to be so calm, or is this something that just happened without you really controlling the whole process?

GASTON GAUDIO: No, it just happened like that. Day after day, things just happened.

Q. Can you very briefly analyze the possible opponents that you're going to be meeting in the semifinal and possibly in the final?

GASTON GAUDIO: You're talking about the next matches then.

Well, Guga, we know what he's like. We all know what he's like. Every time he comes here, I don't know what happens. He just brightens up. Of course, he's not totally fit, in his best form, but he has a lot of experience. Of course, he's been No. 1.

Now, Nalbandian, he can play well anywhere. Certainly he'll go far.

Q. Can you tell us what happens outside of Roland Garros here in Paris, what are you doing?>

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, I'm not doing much. I haven't really had a lot of time. I've been playing. I finish late. I get back late. I watch a bit of television, have something to eat. I just went once to the Champs Elysees in Paris.

Q. Do you think Guga is a more complete player than Roger Federer?

GASTON GAUDIO: No. I was talking about Nalbandian actually. I wasn't talking about Federer. Nalbandian is a complete player.

Of course, Federer is also a genius. I think David, I like him more really.

Q. Talking about the change of mind you have, can we say it's your mindset that's helping you win the match? You have your shots, and then there was this state of mind that you mentioned.

GASTON GAUDIO: Yes, I think that's really basic. It's very important to be feeling well on the court and outside the court. Sometimes I was having a hard time for different reasons. I think that showed on the court, and it showed in my tennis.

As I said, I was trying to change that.

Q. On television after the match, you said that Guillermo and David are really great, that you are coming behind. Now that you are good technically and you have a mental edge, as well, are you also going to be at the same level of them, or do you see yourself somewhere behind?

GASTON GAUDIO: No, I think I'm going to be somewhere behind and providing support (laughter). They are the geniuses. They're the Galactico, and I am the Valencia.

Q. Why can't you be the Galactico?

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, I see things from outside, just as you do. I think they have a special talent. They're incredible. They're in the Top 10. I would be happy if they won the tournament. They really have something in them. I don't know whether things were easier for them from the outset. I don't know what it was that caused that. But I think their level is better.

Q. You mentioned Valencia. They have two titles.

GASTON GAUDIO: I'm just asking for one title, not two.

Q. Now that you're playing more consistently, what sort of ranking do you think you'll achieve?

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, I don't know. I haven't played regularly throughout the year. We'll see what happens on hard court. I'd like to be Top 10, obviously. That's one of my objectives. If I continue playing like this, I hope that's a goal I can reach.

Q. Coria said for him and for David Nalbandian, the Argentinian association of tennis had provided a lot of support, that that is why you and Chela were also affected by this. What happens when you have to think about things that are outside tennis?

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, it's not so much an important factor, but when we all started playing, Juan, Mariano, you know, all the younger ones, Canas, Agustin, sometimes we have been in situations that are, well, complicated. It's nothing really complicated. But sometimes there was no money to travel or we had to cancel a tour. Sometimes you had to stay in Europe for an extra month to wait for the next tournament. We couldn't go back home because we couldn't pay the airfare. Of course, this means you suffer more than you usually would. That has a price. It's very difficult to reach the level that we have now.

I think that now we're all feeling fine. We don't really need to pay attention to that sort of thing. But I think for them, earlier on, they received support, and of course that was very important to them.

Well, I'm not going to judge that. We each followed a different path. Now we're all here. They have reached an incredible level.

THE MODERATOR: Question in English.

Q. You won 20 of 21 points when you came to the net. Will we see more of that in the semifinal whether you're playing Kuerten or Nalbandian?

GASTON GAUDIO: If you going to see more than that?

Q. You coming to the net. Will we see more of that? You only lost one point at net.

GASTON GAUDIO: I'm not used to go so much to the net. Now I'm getting used with the doubles. I'm playing doubles. So maybe with that I'm getting some confidence out there at the net. So we'll see. If I have the chance, of course I will go. You never know.

Q. Do you have a preference about who you play? Last year you lost to Kuerten in the third round. You probably know Nalbandian's game better.

GASTON GAUDIO: Yeah, I know Nalbandian game. But now in this semifinals, it's like playing against anyone is so tough. It's going to be difficult, for sure. They're playing great tennis. Guga, he plays great tennis here in French Open. David is coming up so hard. It's going to be tough.

I don't know. I prefer to play (two/to?) Argentinian guy so we can be maybe a finalist Argentine.

Q. When you came to Paris, what were your hopes and expectations for the tournament?

GASTON GAUDIO: To be in the second week (smiling). I did it.

Q. Now what are they?

GASTON GAUDIO: And now to win the tournament, it's like a dream. When I was a kid, I was dreaming about it. Now I'm in the semifinals, but I have to wait. You know, I have to wait to see who is coming up. It's going to be tough, for sure. I told you.

Q. How big of a deal is this win back home? Do you have any idea how it will be played in the news? How much will this tournament, these next matches, be played up in Argentina?

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, I think that this is like history event, you know. Is the first time that there is all the players in quarterfinals, four of us. So, yeah, they're taking like -- they're taking like an unbelievable week.

So we'll see. Maybe an Argentinian guy is going to take the final, and it's going to be like a dream. I don't know. You can ask them. They know about it.

Q. A lot of us are still trying to understand why the Argentinians are doing so well here. Is it that you train a lot together like the Spanish players, or do you all go your own way?

GASTON GAUDIO: No, we used to go all together, of course. We're pretty good friends. That helps, you know, traveling so much during the whole year, being so far away from home so long. It helps to have some friends here in the tournament.

Yeah, of course, it helps.

Q. Could be a British player standing between an all-Argentine final. How surprised are you by what Henman has done here?

GASTON GAUDIO: I think that, like Guga said the other day, if he reach quarterfinals in Wimbledon, Henman could be, I don't know, winning the tournament here. You never know. Everything can happen, you know.

Q. What chance do you give him against Coria?

GASTON GAUDIO: (Smiling).

Q. Go on, be nice.

GASTON GAUDIO: I don't know. It's going to be difficult for him, for sure. I mean, Coria, he didn't lose not even one set. And he's playing his best tennis. I know that Henman has a lot of experience and he's a great player, but here on clay I guess it's going to be tough for him.

Q. If Henman can get this far here, can you get that far at Wimbledon?

GASTON GAUDIO: No (smiling).

Q. Has Guillermo Vilas played a role in the success of Argentinian tennis at the moment?

GASTON GAUDIO: Yeah, I mean, when I was a kid, he was helping me a lot. Now more or less because he's not living so much in Argentina. He used to go sometimes. But, yes, he gave me some advice, you know, when I was a kid, but not now.

Q. If someone came up to you a few months ago and said, "You will reach the French Open semis," what would you say?

GASTON GAUDIO: "You got to be kidding. That is impossible."

I don't know, maybe when I reach the final there in Barcelona, I start to think that I can do some good stuff here in the French Open. But you never know. You have to come here in Paris and you have to see the draw, you know. I was unseeded. Maybe I can play against some of the top players and not reach the semi like now.

Q. In terms of the reaction in Argentina, if an Argentinian wins, what will happen on the streets of Buenos Aires?

GASTON GAUDIO: On the streets? I don't think they're going to go out on the streets. They're going to be happy, for sure, but I don't think it's going to happen like that. Everybody on the street, I don't think so. That happens only in football.

Q. You said Vilas was giving you advice. What did he say?

GASTON GAUDIO: No, no, when I was a kid. It was like 10 years ago.

Q. What did he say?

GASTON GAUDIO: Nothing. To keep training and fighting, like he used to do.

Q. What is the story of your backhand? Did you ever play with two hands or was it always one hand?

GASTON GAUDIO: Only with one.

Q. How come it's your best shot? Has it always been your best shot?

GASTON GAUDIO: Yeah, always was. I don't know. It happens. I don't know. How I did it? I don't know. Naturally, you know. Like Sampras, he serve like that, I play my backhand like that. I don't know.

chelsea
06-04-2004, 03:52 PM
Gaudio wins battle of Argentina
By Nyree Epplett
Friday, June 4, 2004

Unheralded Argentine Gaston Gaudio won the battle of Argentina on Court Philippe Chatrier Friday, digging deep to upset compatriot and No8 seed David Nalbandian 6-3 7-6(5) 6-0 and move into his first Grand Slam final.

The 25-year-old Buenos Aires native, ranked No44 at the beginning of the tournament, is the first Argentine to reach the final of Roland Garros since Guillermo Vilas in 1982. He now waits to see whether another man named Guillermo (compatriot Guillermo Coria) will join him in the final.

The steely Gaudio played an intelligent, consistent clay court game to dissect the power of his burly countryman, sticking to his game plan when Nalbandian hit a purple patch, and then galloping ahead in the final set after his opponent all but threw the towel in.

The pair traded service breaks in the opening set, before Gaudio surged ahead 4-3, drawing a slew of unforced errors from Nalbandian. Gaudio held to 5-3 and then broke Nalbandian to love to take the first set in 41 minutes. Tellingly, he made just three unforced errors to Nalbandian’s 13.

Despite professing his fondness for fast surfaces, Nalbandian turned over a new leaf in the second set, breaking Gaudio with two explosive winners to lead 1-0. The eighth seed double faulted to hand the break back (1-1) before moving up a gear to reel off the next games.

Looking every bit like he was on his way to settling the score, Nalbandian dominated his countryman from the baseline, dictating rallies with his huge forehand and pouncing on Gaudio’s second serves.

Executing perfect drop shots to unsettle the rhythm of the steady Gaudio, Nalbandian pushed his opponent from corner to corner and broke two more times to stand at an imposing 5-1.

But clay court tennis can do strange things to non-claycourters, as Nalbandian, a former Wimbledon finalist, was about to find out.

Gaudio switched from the back to the front foot, playing uninhibited tennis to easily hold serve (2-5). He then blew apart Nalbandian’s first attempt at serving for the set (3-5) and held again, this time to love (4-5).

Gaudio then triumphed in what was to prove the most decisive game of the match. He staved off two set points on Nalbandian’s serve, and then threaded a glorious backhand down the line to draw even at 5-5. In the ensuing tiebreak tow games later, Gaudio skipped out to a 5-2 lead with some deep penetrating groundstrokes, and then mistakenly served to the wrong (forehand) side of the court. Nalbandian complained bitterly after his return of serve hit the net, but the point stood (6-2) and Gaudio was forced to serve to the same side again. Despite retrieving the next three points, Nalbandian was visibly rattled and let the set, and with it the match, slip from his grasp. He notched up 46 unforced errors (to Gaudio’s 19) and served five double faults.

A revved up Gaudio raced through the final set in 26 minutes, with a physically and mentally spent Nalbandian waving the white flag the whole way.

At the end of the match, which lasted two hours, 26 minutes, Gaudio was overcome with emotions. He walked to his chair at the side of the court, buried his head in his hands and sobbed uncontrollably.

Source: www.rolandgarros.com

chelsea
06-05-2004, 02:49 AM
Roland Garros
Paris
June 4 2004

G. Gaudio/D. Nalbandian
6-3, 7-6(5), 6-0


Q. At the end of your match when you had your head down and it looked like you were crying, what was going through your mind to bring that emotion out in you?

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, I was thinking about all the effort that I have made, you know, when I was a kid and all the dreams I got when I was during all this time playing tennis, you know. I was thinking to be in the finals of the French Open. And now I am.

So happy for me, and that's why I was like a little bit of emotion, yeah.

Q. Two weeks ago in Dusseldorf, the day of the draw, I asked you what your thoughts were, how you felt you were going to go at the French Open. You said you didn't know. How shocked are you? >

GASTON GAUDIO: Like you (smiling).

No, I never thought I going to be in the final of such a big tournament like this. And I was thinking about the first round against Canas, that always to play two Argentinian guys is tough, you know, because we know each other so much. So I didn't think about being in the final like I am, I was thinking just in the first round.

Q. There's some confusion as to the sequence of events that led up to the discussion at the umpire's chair. Can you walk us through exactly what happened with the mix-up with the serves? What was your reaction to the outcome of that?

GASTON GAUDIO: No, there was nothing. I mean, I made history, you know. It's the first time that it happen, something like that, in the French Open.

I serve to opposite side. I should supposed to serve to the other side, and I was serving 5-2 in the tiebreak, and I served to the left. That's why.

After the point, David went to the chair umpire and he told it, you know, "He served to the wrong side." But when the point is done, when you played it already, it's like you can't do anything. That's it. There's nothing more.

Q. You told us the other day about a psychologist you were working with now to boost your motivation. How much do you think it's helped you get that far?

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, I think like hell of a lot, huh? I'm in the final of the French Open, you know. I never thought I'm going to be in a place like now. So I think that he helped me so much.

Q. In what way? What does he say to you?

GASTON GAUDIO: So many, too many ways you have to work on it. He was working so hard with me.

Q. In the event that you might be facing Coria, can you describe your relationship with him.

GASTON GAUDIO: It's perfect.

Q. It's perfect? Hamburg notwithstanding last year?

GASTON GAUDIO: Yeah, but we talk about it, and that's it. It's over. Everything is clear now.

Q. Do you have a preference for who you'd rather play in the final?

GASTON GAUDIO: Yeah, I prefer to play against him. For sure, is going to be an Argentinian winner.

Q. If you are to play Tim Henman in the final, what are your thoughts there?

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, every final is difficult. And Tim is playing great tennis. I saw him a couple of match ago, and he was playing so good. So for sure, it's going to be tough. He is beating this guy that is the King of the Clay. So it's clear that it's going to be tough.

Q. Let's just say things turn around in this match and it is Coria that goes to the final, what do you have to do to get past him, to win the championship?

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, I have to play like unbelievable. I have to play my best tennis. And I have to be sure that I can do it. I have to convince myself that I'm allowed to do it, and I can do it, and that's it.

You've got to go out there and try to do your best. If it happens, great. If not, what can I do?

Q. You're down 5-1 in the second set. What are your thoughts then? Do you feel, "I'll still have a set, one-set-all"?

GASTON GAUDIO: Yeah, I was thinking just to play the third. But then I come back, and I was like 5-4 playing not hundred percent. I was thinking more in the third set. And when I was 5-4, he was a little bit nervous, I guess, because he miss so many opportunities. So when he was serving 5-4, I just get the chance, you know. I was 5-1, and the set start again.

THE MODERATOR: Questions in Spanish.

Q. Can you tell us what went through your mind when you won the match, you were crying?

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, after playing for 10 or 15 years, you know, always thinking about the same thing, you know, always dreaming about being in that sort of situation, well, you know, it's incredible.

Q. You never cried on television before.

GASTON GAUDIO: No, no, of course. But today, I don't know. I don't know, it was crazy. I don't know. Just, you know, that's the way it happens. So many things, so many memories, so much that people might not know about, but things that I've been doing since I'm a little child, so many sacrifices. Then suddenly to win a match...

Q. Do you realize how well you're playing? Let me mention once again the wonderful match against Thomas Enqvist. You continued playing well after that match against Andreev, and then today again.

GASTON GAUDIO: Yes, I know I've been playing well. Today sometimes, and in particular the most important points, I played well. That gives you extra confidence. That's what made me win the match.

Q. You mentioned the psychological support that you received. When you were 5-1 down, you were still trying to win, you were still fighting there. Maybe before you would have simply lost the set.

GASTON GAUDIO: Yes, I was thinking more about the third set, but I was still trying. As soon as I had an opportunity, I took it. I was 5-4. I took the opportunities and continued fighting.

Q. You had a dream as a child. You're going to have to win the final.

GASTON GAUDIO: Yeah, there's always something left to do.

Q. How did you manage your stress before starting the match? Is there something you're going to do?

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, I slept very well. I wasn't feeling really nervous really. Now I'm enjoying the situation - more so than other days.

Against Andreev, I was far more nervous. Today that wasn't the case. I slept well. I went on the court, you know, I was feeling really fine.

Q. Is that what you're going to try to do in the final?

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, I've never been in a final, but I'm going to try to repeat that experience.

Q. You say that tennis is suffering. Today when you saw what you were achieving, did you actually enjoy yourself? Did you think about those things?

GASTON GAUDIO: No, it's just right at the end of the match. During the tiebreak, as well, I was enjoying things. You know, you feel tense, but you still enjoy yourself. Then when I finished the match, of course I enjoyed it. But also when I was serving for the match, I was also feeling very nervous.

Q. So you enjoyed the tiebreak? That was the only time you actually were feeling fine?

GASTON GAUDIO: Yeah, I was feeling fine during the tiebreak.

Q. Are you going to change your style according to whom you're playing, Coria or Henman, or is it going to be the same thing?

GASTON GAUDIO: No, you know, I'm going to play the same way, whoever I play against in the final.

Q. You said you prefer to play against an Argentine. If you were playing against Henman, what's going to happen from a tactical point of view?

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, against Henman, we know it really doesn't depend on me because he tries to lead the game, always tries to take the initiative. So it's going to be complicated. I'm going to have to make sure that I can impose my own style rather than letting him take the initiative.

Q. You also said sometimes you don't know what's going to happen on the following day. Now you're going to be in the final at the French Open. Don't you think you know what you're going to do on the following day?

GASTON GAUDIO: I don't understand your question.

Q. Don't you know what your tennis is going to look like? Can you foresee how you're going to play?

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, you start realizing, you know, when you have confidence, you don't know if it's going to be eight, nine or ten, but you know you're going to play well. Since I've never been in this sort of situation, I don't really know what's going to happen, whether I'm going to be feeling very tense or whether I'm going to control the situation. I don't know.

Q. Do you feel you're a Galactico?

GASTON GAUDIO: No.

Q. What's missing so that you feel Galactico in the final?

GASTON GAUDIO: I have to win more matches, a lot more matches.

Q. For those who were lucky to see you win in 2000 in Barcelona, is your style of play the same, is it of greater quality? You had a wonderful time in Barcelona.

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, I think so, because I'm learning how to, you know, go on the court and take the opportunities. That's something that I had to improve. I've been improving either in doubles or with Franco. I think, yeah, my level has improved since then.

Q. In the tiebreak, when you had the problem with the umpire, Nalbandian said that was a really bad mistake that the umpire made. >

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, yes, we all made a mistake. That's the sort of thing that happens in life. It's normal, you know. Nobody realized - I didn't realize - and what can you do about it?

Q. (No microphone.)

GASTON GAUDIO: I was feeling a bit nervous at that time.

RogiFan88
06-05-2004, 04:43 AM
French open
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tears of joy from gaucho Gaudio
Upset win by the other half of the all-Argentinian final tomorrow

Chris Curtain
Saturday June 5, 2004

The Guardian

Tim Henman was not the first man at Roland Garros yesterday to find that even the hottest Wimbledon form cuts little ice on clay, as the afternoon's opening semi-final saw David Nalbandian, the 2002 All England finalist, crash in straight sets to his unseeded fellow Argentinian Gaston Gaudio.
Gaudio's 6-3, 7-6, 6-0 win over the world No10 meant that the 25-year-old from Buenos Aires became the first man from his country to reach the French final since Guillermo Vilas in 1982. In what British fans will inevitably see as a double ration of misery, tomorrow's all-Argentinian final will pit two 5ft 9in right-handed clay-court specialists.

Gaudio, who had his backhand working to perfection against Nalbandian, took up tennis at the age of six and is currently ranked No34 in the world after making it to the final in Barcelona this spring.

After yesterday's 2-hour win he seemed overwhelmed at the prospect of his first grand slam final, even if the form book gives him little chance of an upset against the No3 seed Guillermo Coria, whom he has beaten only once, back in 2001, and who has won 48 of his past 50 matches on clay.

"I never thought I was going to be in the final of the French Open," said Gaudio, who broke down in tears after clinching victory. "I was thinking about all the effort I made when I was young and all the dreams about winning here. That is why I was a little emotional at the end."

He was helped by a subdued display from Nalbandian, who one elite rival said recently has "the best hands in tennis" but who had problems lower down in Paris. He said he had been hampered by a rib-cage injury, which particularly affected his serve.

"I had a problem with my intercostal muscles in the last set against Guga [Kuerten, in the quarter-final]," he said. "It was a little better today but it was a still a bit of problem.

"But I had my chances in the second set and I didn't take them. Then he played very well in the third set."

Nalbandian rallied after losing the first set to go 5-2 up in the second with a succession of trademark drop shots. But nerves or soreness then set in and he was broken twice when serving for the set. In the tie-break he saved three set points, but it was Gaudio's day.

Guardian Unlimited © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2004
http://sport.guardian.co.uk/print/0,3858,4940416-108554,00.html

RogiFan88
06-05-2004, 04:46 AM
Declaraciones de Gastón Gaudio
"Lloré porque se me cumplieron todos mis sueños"

El Gato dijo que todavía no se considera un galáctico y negó tener problemas con Guillermo Coria, su rival del próximo domingo

PARIS.- Gastón Gaudio logró hoy la clasificación para la final de Roland Garros por primera vez en su carrera, tras derrotar a su compatriota David Nalbandian, y lloró en el court central, porque se cumplieron todos sus sueños de chico.

"Lo que me está pasando es algo increíble. Si llevo quince años jugando al tenis, cada día lo he hecho pensando en algo como esto, en llegar a esta final. Pensé que nunca lo lograría y, después de tanto sufrimiento y sacrificio, he llegado hasta aquí", aseguró.

Gaudio señaló que no es un jugador que acostumbre a llorar, pero señaló que "lo de hoy es algo fantástico".

El argentino se enfrentará con su compatriota Guillermo Coria, tercer cabeza de serie, que hoy derrotó al británico Tim Henman.

"Para estar en final de un torneo como este hay que estar jugando muy bien. En los puntos fundamentales jugué bien y eso te da confianza", afirmó Gaudio.

El tenista de Temperley se mostró confiado sobre sus opciones en la final, aunque comentó que es una situación nueva para él, en la que no sabe cual será su reacción.

"Cuando tenés confianza sabés que podés jugar bien, pero yo no viví nunca esta situación, no sé como voy a reaccionar, no sé si me van a superar los acontecimientos", dijo.

Gaudio indicó que todavía no se considera un galáctico, para lo que "hay que ganar más partidos", aunque reconoce que su juego ha mejorado y, sobre todo, su mentalidad.

"El psicólogo con el que estoy trabajando me ha ayudado mucho", aseguró el jugador que, sin embargo, confesó que sigue sufriendo en la cancha.

"Hoy sólo disfruté un rato en el juego de desempate, el resto del partido he sufrido. Aunque estuve menos nervioso que en otras ocasiones. Recuerdo que el partido contra (Igor) Andreev estuve más tenso", señaló.

Gaudio desmintió que tenga problemas personales con Coria, con el que tuvo un enfrentamiento en el torneo de Hamburgo del año pasado. "Hablamos y aclaramos malos entendidos. Ahora nuestra relación es fantástica", dijo.

Coria y Gaudio se han enfrentado en cuatro ocasiones, siempre sobre tierra batida, con tres victorias para el primero, la última precisamente en cuartos de final de aquel torneo de Hamburgo.
Fuente : EFE

http://www.lanacion.com.ar/04/06/04/dd_607433.asp
LA NACION LINE | 04/06/2004 | 15:11 | Deportes

11:15 | ROLAND GARROS
"No lo puedo creer"

Entre lágrimas, Gaudio calificó la victoria ante Nalbandian como "la emoción más grande de su vida". Y agradeció a quienes confiaron en él desde sus inicios en el circuito.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Gastón Gaudio era pura alegría luego de derrotar a David Nalbandian y conseguir el pasaje a la final de Roland Garros. "No puedo creer que estoy en la final de Roland Garros, el torneo de mi vida. Es un sueño, nunca tuve en mi vida esta emoción, hace mucho que venimos luchando y esperando", relató entre lágrimas el tenista.

Gaudio no se olvidó de quienes confiaron en él desde un principio, cuando se hacía difícil la inserción en el circuito. "Se lo dedico a mi familia, a la gente que me ayudó desde que era chico, a mi novia y a todos los que han hecho posible que yo esté aquí", aseguró.

"Cuando me iba no podía creer que estaba saliendo de la cancha tras haber ganado la semifinal de Roland Garros, es un sueño. Nunca en mi vida lloro, es la primera vez", aseguró un Gaudio todavía emocionado y con lágrimas en los ojos.

Sobre el partido con Nalbandian, calificó como "normales" los nervios del set inicial. Y confesó que sentía que no tenía chances de ganar el segundo parcial. "Cuando estaba 5-1 abajo, ya pensaba en el tercer set. Pero empecé a jugar mejor y después fue algo increíble. Yo había empezado nervioso el partido, porque Nalbandian es un gran jugador", confesó.

Ya imaginando la final del domingo, Gaudio dijo que no le importa quién será su rival. "Sé que será complicado contra cualquiera de los dos, pero tengo la esperanza de que me queda una sola guerra ya, y habrá que esperar", aseguró emocionado.

http://www.clarin.com/diario/2004/06/04/um/m-771492.htm

chelsea
06-05-2004, 07:17 AM
Coria Chases Roland Garros Destiny & Race Lead

Notes courtesy ITF media department

Guillermo Coria is one victory away from the No. 1 position in the INDESIT ATP 2004 Race; he will overtake Roger Federer in the top spot if he defeats Gaston Gaudio in Sunday’s Roland Garros final. Having been at No. 34 before the tournament began, Gaudio now stands at No. 9, but he will rise to No. 4 if he defeats Coria. A further 60 points are on offer for the 2004 Roland Garros champion.

Both Guillermo Coria and Gaston Gaudio are bidding to become the 48th different Grand Slam champion in the Open Era. Roland Garros has been the scene of a player’s first Grand Slam title 19 times in the Open Era, soon to be 20 times. The event has had more than twice as many first-time Grand Slam champions as any of the other majors. Nine men have won their first Slam title at the Australian Open and at Wimbledon, and ten have done so at the US Open (Open Era).

With a new Grand Slam champion guaranteed today, the run of majors during which no man has captured consecutive Grand Slam titles is extended to 17 events. It was already the longest streak without a back-to-back winner in Open Era history. Andre Agassi, as winner of the 1999 US Open and the 2000 Australian Open, was the last man to win consecutive majors.

This is the first all-Argentine final in Grand Slam tournament history, and Coria and Gaudio are the third and fourth different Argentines to reach a Grand Slam final. The nation is guaranteed a second Grand Slam champion, as a successor to the legendary Guillermo Vilas, and a fifth Grand Slam title.

This is the seventh all-nation men’s final at Roland Garros in the Open Era, and Argentina now joins a relatively exclusive club of countries to have featured in all-nation Grand Slam tournament finals. At Roland Garros, only three other nations, Australia, Spain and USA, have achieved this. Including all Grand Slam events, they are joined by Czechoslovakia, Germany and Sweden.

History
All four of the pair’s previous encounters have been on clay. Although Coria has won three of their four previous meetings, all of his victories have been achieved in three sets, and their last meeting was more than a year ago. Coria’s first win against Gaudio was en route to his first career title at Vina Del Mar, Chile, in 2001. Coria also went on to the title at TMS Hamburg in 2003 after defeating Gaudio in the semifinals.

Guillermo Coria
Coria has won 48 of his last 50 clay court matches through his semifinal defeat of No. 9 seed Tim Henman, 36 64 60 75. That match, at two hours 46 minutes, was the longest he has played this tournament and marked the first time he has dropped a set here this year.

Just as impressive as Coria’s clay court win-loss record is his win-loss record in sets during his last 50 clay court matches. He has won 110 sets on clay, while losing only 19.

During his march to the final of 2004 Roland Garros, Coria has lost only 50 games in 17 sets, benefiting from Nicolas Escude’s retirement after one set in the round of 16. This is the easiest journey to the Roland Garros final of any man since Spaniard Alberto Berasategui lost 42 games on his way to the final in 1994. Berasategui defeated Magnus Larsson 63 64 61 in the semifinals before losing to countryman Sergi Bruguera 63 75 26 61 in the final.

Coria, at 22 years, 145 days on the last day of the tournament, is slightly younger than the man he was named after, Guillermo Vilas, was when he made the first of four final appearances here in 1975. Vilas was 22 years, 305 days old at the end of that 1975 tournament.

Coria was boys’ champion at Roland Garros in 1999, defeating countryman David Nalbandian 64 63 in the final. Only five of the 53 different Roland Garros Junior Boys’ Champions have gone on to win the men's singles title, most recently in 1988, when Mats Wilander claimed the last of three titles here. If Coria does go on to win the title, it will have taken him five years to progress from being Boys’ Champion to Men’s Champion, which would be the third shortest gap between the two achievements here (Ken Rosewall and Mats Wilander both won the men’s tournament one year after winning the boys’ event).

The last player to reach the men’s final here having first reached the boys’ final was Juan Carlos Ferrero, who reached the junior final in 1998 losing to Fernando Gonzalez 46 64 63, going on to reach the men’s final for the first time in 2002 losing to Albert Costa 61 60 46 63.

If Coria were to claim the title here, it would be the third time in the last four Grand Slam events that a junior champion has gone on to win the men’s event at the same major. At 2003 Wimbledon, Roger Federer won the men’s title having won the boys’ event in 1998, and at the 2003 US Open, Andy Roddick won the men’s title having won the junior title in 2000.

In his semifinal defeat of Tim Henman, Coria won 13 games in a row from 4-2 down in the second set to lead 36 64 60 30. He then lost five consecutive games to trail 5-3 in the fourth set, before winning four games in a row to win the match.

Coria’s progression to the semifinals at 2004 Roland Garros marked the 11th time in Open Era history that a player has reached the Roland Garros semifinals without losing a set. Coria was the first man to achieve this feat since Berasategui and Bruguera did so in 1994.

The last Argentine to advance to the semifinals here without losing a set was Guillermo Vilas, who did so as the No. 3 seed in 1982, and went on to reach the final without dropping a set. Vilas defeated Jose Higueras, the No. 14 seed, 61 63 76 in the semifinals, but lost in the final to Mats Wilander 16 76 60 64.

Coria was the first Argentine to advance to consecutive semifinals here since Jose-Luis Clerc in 1981 and 1982. The only other Argentine to do so in the Open Era was Guillermo Vilas in 1977 and 1978. Vilas in fact advanced to the final in both of those years, winning the first against Brian Gottfried 60 63 60, losing the second to Bjorn Borg 61 61 63.

At 2003 Roland Garros, as No. 7 seed, Coria defeated Andre Agassi 46 63 62 64 in the quarterfinals then lost in the semifinals to Martin Verkerk 76 64 76.

Following his semifinal finish here last year, Coria went on a 31-match winning streak on clay. His streak was halted by Roger Federer in the final at AMS Hamburg two weeks ago, the Swiss winning 46 64 62 63. Coria’s 31 consecutive clay court victories produced the longest winning streak since Thomas Muster won 38 in a row in 1995-96.

Coria’s winning streak on clay took in titles in Stuttgart, Kitzbuhel and Sopot in the second half of 2003, and titles at Buenos Aires and AMS Monte Carlo this year. He defeated Carlos Moya 64 61 in the final at Buenos Aires, and Rainer Schuettler 62 61 63 in the final at AMS Monte Carlo.

Despite his impressive clay court form, Coria’s 22-1 clay court win-loss record is second best for the season in terms of total wins behind Carlos Moya, who had a 28-6 record through his loss to Coria here in the quarterfinals.

After retiring from the NASDAQ-100 Open final in March (losing to Andy Roddick 67 63 61 ret.) with a suspected back injury, Coria missed two weeks of the season, including the first week of the European clay court season, with kidney stones. Having first been told in Miami that he was suffering from a discal hernia and could be out for five to six months, it was discovered in Argentina that he had kidney stones, that were cured by drinking lots of water.

Although clay is Coria’s preferred surface, he performed well in the American hard court Masters Series events in March/April, advancing to the quarterfinals at AMS Indian Wells (falling to Andre Agassi 64 75) and to the final at AMS Miami, where he retired against Andy Roddick as described above. It was his third hard court final from a total of 12 appearances in finals.

Gaston Gaudio
Gaudio has reached his first Grand Slam tournament final in his 21st Grand Slam event. In his semifinal defeat of No. 8 seed David Nalbandian, Gaudio won the first set, but Nalbandian led 5-1 in the second. Gaudio won 12 of the next 13 games to seal victory 63 76 60.

Gaudio is bidding to become the first unseeded Roland Garros champion since Gustavo Kuerten in 1997. In the Open Era, Roland Garros has now seen nine unseeded finalists. Of the eight previous, two went on to become unseeded champions, Kuerten following in the path of Mats Wilander in 1982.

There has now been an unseeded men’s finalist at four of the most recent five Grand Slam events, starting with Martin Verkerk at Roland Garros last year. Since then, it has happened at 2003 Wimbledon (Mark Philippoussis) and the 2004 Australian Open (Marat Safin) ahead of here.

If he wins the final, Gaudio will be the fourth lowest-ranked man to win a Grand Slam title in Open Era history and the history of the INDESIT ATP Entry Ranking.

Gaudio’s semifinal defeat of No. 8 David Nalbandian was his third victory over a seeded opponent at this event, and it improved his win-loss record against seeds at Grand Slam events to 5-6. Nalbandian is the highest seed he has defeated so far in his career. Before 2004 Roland Garros, Arnaud Clement, seeded No. 15 at the 2002 Australian Open, was the highest seed Gaudio had defeated at a major. Gaudio defeated Clement 64 46 62 76 in the second round there.

Before here, the round of 16 was the furthest Gaudio had ever advanced at a Grand Slam tournament, doing so at Roland Garros in 2002, when Hicham Arazi retired from their third round match with thigh cramps. Gaudio won 62 46 64 31 ret, then lost his round of 16 match to eventual runner-up Juan Carlos Ferrero 67 61 67 62 64.

By reaching the Roland Garros semifinals, Gaudio bettered the Roland Garros record of his coach Franco Davin. Davin, also of Argentina, reached the Roland Garros quarterfinals in 1991, losing to Michael Stich 64 64 64.

This is Gaudio’s sixth successive appearance at Roland Garros. Last year he also advanced to the third round, losing at this stage to three-times champion Gustavo Kuerten 76 75 57 63.

This being Gaudio’s 21st Grand Slam tournament, no man has taken as long to reach his first Grand Slam final since Albert Costa advanced to the Roland Garros final in his 26th attempt in 2002. Costa, of course, went on to win the title.

If Gaudio wins the title today, he will have taken the eighth most attempts to win a Grand Slam title of any man in the Open Era. There are currently seven men who have taken more than 21 majors to win a Grand Slam title.

In 2002, when he reached the round of 16 here in his best Grand Slam performance before now, Gaudio entered Roland Garros with the year’s third-best clay court record (by number of match wins). His 16-2 record that year ranked behind only Carlos Moya (19-5) and Younes El Aynaoui (17-4). Additionally, Gaudio entered the tournament having won 13 of his 14 previous matches, collecting back-to-back titles at Barcelona and Mallorca.

Although his form coming into Roland Garros this year was not as impressive as two years ago, Gaudio has now assembled an eight-match winning streak, having won both the singles matches he played at World Team Cup (defeating Lleyton Hewitt 63 57 76 and Martin Verkerk 46 62 64) the week before this event.

Clay is the only surface on which Gaudio has won back-to-back matches this season. In addition to reaching the quarterfinals at Vina Del Mar, he advanced to the final at Barcelona in an impressive run which included victories over Carlos Moya in the round of 16 and Gustavo Kuerten in the quarters. He lost in the final to Tommy Robredo 63 46 62 36 63.

Gaudio played back-to-back five-setters in the first two rounds of 2004 Roland Garros, improving his five-set record to 3-9. He had previously won just one five-setter in ten played, that being his first, when he defeated Bernd Karbacher 67 46 63 61 64 in the second round here in 1999.

Gaudio has been working with a sports psychologist to learn to relax and enjoy playing his matches more.

www.atptennis.com

Action Jackson
06-05-2004, 07:23 AM
From an Australian paper.

Tears of joy as Gaudio books Paris final
June 5, 2004 - 12:30AM

Paris: Unseeded Gaston Gaudio of Argentina upset eighth-seeded compatriot David Nalbandian last night with a class display of clay-court tennis to reach the French Open men's singles final.

Gaudio won 6-3 7-6 (7/5) 6-0 and will now play the winner of the other semi-final between third seeded Guillermo Coria of Argentina and ninth seeded Tim Henman of Britain in Sunday's final.

He is the first Argentinian player to reach the final in Paris since Guillermo Vilas lost to Mats Wilander in 1982.

The 25-year-old Gaudio, playing in his first Grand Slam semi-final in 21 attempts, went into the match as underdog to his 22-year-old compatriot who had beaten both Marat Safin and Gustavo Kuerten on his way to the last four.

But it was Gaudio who took command from the start under cool, cloudy conditions on a half-empty Philippe Chatrier centre-court.

From 3-3, he ran off three games in a row including two service breaks dominating the bigger and more physical Nalbandian with his searing groundstrokes off both flanks from the baseline.


The 2002 Wimbledon runner-up appeared to be getting back into the match when he moved 5-1 up in the second set, but incredibly Gaudio clawed his way back to 5-5 and then in the tie-break he took a 6-2 lead and went two sets up with a smash at the net on his fourth set point.

That appeared to take the heart out of Nalbandian and Gaudio rapidly moved to match point with three successive service breaks.

He hit long on the first but on the second Nalbandian flapped at a forehand and it died at the net sparking off a tearful celebration from Gaudio.

"This is a great day for me. It's my favourite tournament and I have always dreamed of getting to the final here," he said.

"Now that I am in the final I can dream of winning it all, but it will be very hard as both Coria and Henman are excellent players.

"This is the result of a lot of hard work and a lot of hard battles and it is just so satisfying to be able to experience it."

After a promising start to his career, Gaudio appeared to be in danger of being surpassed by a younger set of talented compatriots led by Nalbandian and Coria and he even sought the help of a sports psychologist to learn to relax and take more enjoyment out of his game.

He played reasonably well on clay in the buildup to Roland Garros but struggled though two five-setters in the first two rounds against compatriot Guillermo Canas and Jiri Novak of the Czech Republic.

But he gave marvellous display in the quarter-finals defeating Lleyton Hewitt of Australia in straight sets and his comprehensive win over Nalbandian leaves him on the cusp of achieving his lifelong ambition

chelsea
06-06-2004, 08:46 PM
Roland Garros
Paris
June 6 2004

G. Gaudio/G. Coria
0-6 3-6 6-4 6-1 8-6

Q. Do you think this is your win 100 percent, or that his injury helped you a lot or affected him? >

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, I think that if you play with a guy that he's injured, of course it's gonna help you. But that was in the fourth set. And then in the fifth, he start to run again like the beginning of the match.

So for sure it help me a lot for the fourth set because I was like almost done. And then in the fifth, I start to play again another match. It was like a new match. Because he was running again, and it was tough.

>

Q. How much was difficult to you to manage this situation, that sometimes it's not easy to play. >

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, it's complicated to play a guy that you don't know how to play, you don't know the strategy to play a guy like he's maybe running, maybe not. You just thinking to put the ball in, and then he make a forehand winner, you know. So you don't know how to manage that.

But I think I was a little bit lucky at the end when I got two match points down and I came back. And, I don't know, I did it. I don't know how, but I won.

>

Q. In the fourth set some of us were asking in the press box, you did not seem to be using dropshots in the fourth set even though he could barely move out there. Why not? >

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, is not a big ‑‑ it's not so much important that, you know. It's like I was 6‑1. I won 6‑1 the fourth set. I almost ‑‑ he couldn't run, he couldn't do anything. So I was worried about the fifth and I was thinking about the fifth and not too much in the fourth. I was like just put it in and he was like missing everything, that's why.

>

Q. To follow up on that question. Did you not find yourself struggling with some emotions as a human being rather than just as a competitor on the tennis court that kept you from being a little more ruthless and using dropshots in that fourth set?>

GASTON GAUDIO: I don't know what you mean. I don't understand.

>

Q. Did you find yourself feeling pity and compassion? >

GASTON GAUDIO: No, no, no.

>

Q. Did that affect your play in the fourth set?>

GASTON GAUDIO: No. No, no. No, like I told you before, in the fourth set, I mean, I was just putting the ball in and that's it. I don't care. He was like ‑‑ he couldn't run, but I was thinking about the fifth. That's why.

>

Q. One last question. Is what happened this afternoon, in your opinion, is it an example simply of life just not being very fair sometimes? >

GASTON GAUDIO: Being not fair? Why?

>

Q. Because your opponent suffered an extreme physical injury during the match. >

GASTON GAUDIO: This is a game that we have to run, you have to prepare yourself and you have to do all the stuff to play tennis, you know. And there's mental, physically and tennis. So this is the game. The way that it is.

>

Q. How does a player like you go from last year or the year before struggling a little bit, not having major progress at a Grand Slam, and then coming here in a two‑week period, all of a sudden, you're on top of the world and pull out one of the most remarkable matches we've seen? >

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, I don't realize now. I just finished my match. I don't know how much is gonna change my life with this. I can't believe it yet, so...

I don't know how many changes I made or what was the main thing that I change. But the only thing that I know is that I won. So I don't have the explanation, now. Maybe in a couple of days I gonna realize what I have done.

>

Q. Your coach was saying you made a lot of technical changes as well as the mental work you were speaking about in the last year. Did you always believe or was there a time this year when you thought, "Yes, I can win a Grand Slam. Yes, I've turned the corner and now I can be a great player"? >

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, I guess until now I never believe that I can win a Grand Slam. I was like playing today until the last point, and I was like not even thinking that I'm gonna win this tournament.

So I change a lot of things in my mental part, you know, is like I was working a lot. But I don't know if I was prepared to win the Slam like I did.

So I don't know. Maybe from now on, I'm gonna believe in myself more.

>

Q. How important was making the connection with the crowd, sort of third set and where you went from there?>

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, it was real important for me because I was like a little bit too nervous. And after that, I start to relax. I relax a little bit more, trying to enjoy the moment that I was living, being in a final, and it was my first time, and being with a lot of people down there, with the crowd and everything. It's like too much for me.

So after that, I start to relax a little bit more, and trying to enjoy that moment. It was good. It works.

>

Q. And in that final set, a couple of times you burst out laughing. What were you thinking? >

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, I was laughing because I couldn't believe what was going on over there. It was like a movie, you know. I was watching my coach and I was telling him, "What is this?" I mean, it's like too much.

>

Q. So now that it's happened and you've had a little while to think about it, what does this really mean to you? >

GASTON GAUDIO: Means everything. Everything.

I mean, since I was a kid, I was dreaming to be down here, being here and win this tournament, talking to all these guys here (laughing). It's like a dream, you know.

>

Q. What was the emotional process you were undergoing? Because in the first two sets we thought ‑ at least me ‑ that you were feeling defeated. Then you end laughing. What was the process there? >

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, I think that it was the moment that the people start to make the waves. From that moment, I think that I start to enjoy it more, the match, and being more relax and trying to play my tennis. Because until that moment, I couldn't play like anything. I was too nervous, and I didn't do anything. I was like making so many mistakes.

So I think that from that moment was the main point.

>

Q. When you were down 6‑love, 5‑1, have you thought like, "Okay, Gaston, well done, final is enough," or you always think that you could recover him and go back? >

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, it's tough to be in a final 6‑love, 5‑1 down. It was like I was suffering. I was suffering so much. I was telling my coach that I want to leave, I don't want to be here. I prefer to lose in the first round and not to be in here in the final and making this, you know?

Final, like I told the other guy, it's like I was trying to relax myself a little bit more and trying to enjoy the moment. And, finally, I did it.

>

Q. How do you feel by receiving the trophy from the hands of Guillermo Vilas, who is one of your idols? >

GASTON GAUDIO: It was exactly the way that I dreamed. Well, it's great. I mean, like I told all the people there, I was like ‑‑ I think that I'm playing here because of him. So getting that trophy from him, it was like a dream.

>

Q. You referred a little bit to some of the ups and downs of your career. Can you tell us a little bit more about that. And this year, specifically, how it's been going. And also when you started working with the psychologist. >

GASTON GAUDIO: No, I been working with him since quite a while, I mean one year. But this year, I mean, I was playing so bad. I was like in the clay season, I didn't do anything good. I was not playing my best tennis. I reach the final in Barcelona. And from that moment ‑‑ from that moment I think that I start to get in again in my tennis.

I don't know, I played last week in Dusseldorf, and I won a match that maybe makes me feel so good because I was like almost winning that match. I was 6‑3, 5‑2 serving for the match, and then he would recover and come back. I still fighting. So that, from a mental point of view, was like too good.

When I came here, I was playing match by match, you know, step by step, and I don't know...

>

Q. Follow‑up. What has the psychologist been able to help you improve? >

GASTON GAUDIO: He was helping me in the way that I have to enjoy more the things that I am doing, you know. Like trying to ‑‑ not to suffer so much in the court, and trying to ‑‑ happiness, you know, be happy over there, and trying to fight all the time. That's what he was trying to do with me.

>

Q. You said before that you made lots of sacrifices to play tennis. Can you talk a little bit about it, please. >

GASTON GAUDIO: The sacrifice that all the tennis player used to do, but the people doesn't know. We used to travel so much and being by ourself without my family, without my friends. We can't go out and maybe sometimes have the money to travel when you are not getting so much, when you are not winning and you're not playing big tournaments like now. When you're a kid, you have to maybe ask for money to your grandpa to see maybe if you can take the flight to the tournament.

And all that sacrifices, I think that makes you ‑ how can I say? ‑ makes you, you know, like being there in the court and fight more ‑ more than the other ones.

>

Q. Were you pleased when you saw Guillermo Vilas and John McEnroe giving you the greatest trophy? Were you especially pleased with that? >

GASTON GAUDIO: Especially what?

>

Q. Pleased. >

GASTON GAUDIO: Yeah. I mean, it's like I touch heaven, you know. It's everything. I was talking with (Mack?) before the match and was just asking for some advice, you know. Because I was too nervous and I was telling him what I should do or, "Tell me what you think about it," or, "Give me some advice," because I'm suffering before the match, and it didn't even start.

He was telling me, "You have to relax yourself," and, "You are just in the final, try and enjoy this moment, and maybe in a couple years you will say this ‑‑ you will maybe" ‑ I don't know ‑ "you will say that, 'Why I couldn't enjoy that moment?' And now that I'm not playing anymore, you know, you gonna miss it." He helped me a lot before the match.

I don't know. Even that I start the match so nervous, during the match I was thinking about that.

>

Q. When Guillermo first called the trainer, some people wondered if he was kind of going into some gamesmanship, trying to get in your head a little bit. What were your thoughts at that point? Did you doubt he was injured or did you wait to see what happened?>

GASTON GAUDIO: No, I was waiting just to see what happened. I mean, he couldn't play the fourth set. I think that he was injured. Even the fifth set, he couldn't serve.

Yeah, yeah, I thought maybe the same situation like in Hamburg, but then I realized that it wasn't like that.

>

Q. Do you realize that the same way that Guillermo Vilas was referenced for the kids in Argentina, now you could be a role model for them? >

GASTON GAUDIO: (Laughing). No, I don't even think about that yet. I don't know. Everything is coming too fast, you know. It's like I will have to calm down and go to my hotel, lie on my bed, and just think what I have done, you know.

>

Q. You talked about your family a minute ago. Could you talk about the inspiration of your father, in particular. I know you've mentioned that before. >

GASTON GAUDIO: Well, I think that everything that I have done, I owe it to him. He made so much effort to me, for me, and for all of us, you know, my brothers, my sisters.

So I want to dedicate all this to him. He deserve it, for sure.

>

Q. A couple of days ago, you said you saw Nalbandian and Coria as the Galacticos, and you were something of a Valencia because Valencia won the league. >

GASTON GAUDIO: I don't lie. I always say the truth.

>

Q. Were you being smart at the time?>

GASTON GAUDIO: That's why I say Valencia, you know, because they got the championship and I got it. So I don't lie. That's why (smiling).

>

Q. You said, during your speech, when you were talking about your parents, you didn't ask them to come. Did you think if they came it would make you too nervous? Did you not ask them early enough?>

GASTON GAUDIO: No, I prefer to be like I was in the matches before, just with my people, the people that we were doing our stuff together the whole tournament. So I didn't want them to change anything, you know. They know that I have it always with me, but in my heart, you know.

THE MODERATOR: Spanish questions, please.

>

Q. In your life you lived incredible things in Moscow, in Croatia, in Barcelona. When you look back on what you lived, what do you feel today, when you see that you win 8‑6 in the fifth and that you win the French Open? >

GASTON GAUDIO: It's 100 percent satisfaction. As you said, I had difficult moments. People don't know about it, in Moscow or in Malaga. In Malaga, people know how they criticized me.

It's true when you come back to Buenos Aires that you have the impression that it's my fault, and it hurt me. This is the reason why I enjoy this moment twice as much, because there are people who help me at that difficult moment. It was a difficult moment of my life.

Now, it's like a revenge. I worked a lot, I fought a lot ‑ more than ever. To reach that moment, this is life. Now I enjoy it.

>

Q. Did you think at a certain time you had lost the match? >

GASTON GAUDIO: Yes, at one time I thought it was lost.

Ouch, I have a cramp.

Yes, at any stage I thought I could lose the match ‑ 15‑40, when he was serving. I hit my backhand, and I thought, "We'll see what happens."

>

Q. You didn't have a good year until now, but you beat Moya this year. Do you believe this tournament was important? >

GASTON GAUDIO: Yes. After Barcelona, I had the feeling that I was playing well again, and I felt that my tennis was back. I was feeling good, and I was behaving very well. So I felt good when I arrived in this tournament.

>

Q. Guga in Buenos Aires said that you were a potential winner of the French Open and you had enough talent to win. Did you talk about it with him? >

GASTON GAUDIO: It's true that with Guga, we are good friends. I always admired him as a person before anything else. He was asked how it happened when he won and he came here. I won a challenger last week, and then we speak as good friends. I will not forget that the first time I came here he asked me to play with him. Since then, I respect him a lot.

>

Q. Your career is now at a turning point. You didn't imagine that a couple of minutes ago. Do you think about something? >

GASTON GAUDIO: I believe it is going to change many things, but I don't know what. I don't even realize that I won yet. I didn't have time to understand that. Of course, it will change many things, but I'm not thinking about it right now.

>

Q. It's been 25 years or 27 years since an Argentinian didn't win here. It was legendary. Are you going to become a legend thanks to this victory? >

GASTON GAUDIO: We'll see with time. But we can't compare with Guillermo Vilas. I think it's thanks to him that I was able to play. He won many titles. Nobody's going to catch up on what he did. Now it's our time, but it's another level. I think that everything that can bring joy and pleasure to the Argentinians, we will do it.

>

Q. Up to what point did the support of the public in the third set helped you for winning this match? >

GASTON GAUDIO: I believe it was fundamental, because when I was down 4‑3, I was very nervous. I couldn't feel the ball properly. I was not enjoying it all at that moment. Suddenly, the crowd did the wave, and I enjoyed my tennis more. I enjoyed the match, and I came back into the match.

>

Q. Did you think about Maradona?>

GASTON GAUDIO: Yes, Maradona and all the people I mentioned. If I can bring as much joy as he did, why not? I hope I can give him emotions. Even if we can do very little for him, we will do it.

>

Q. This pres conference is being broadcast in Argentina. Do you want to speak to your parents and your friends in front of the camera? Do you want to send them a message? >

GASTON GAUDIO: I already send a message from the court. I told them what I felt, that I loved them, that everything is for them, and that we are going to celebrate all that when I come back.

>

Q. Are you speaking to someone in particular? >

GASTON GAUDIO: No, to my whole family and all the people who are helping me.

>

Q. You went through hard times. Do you believe you can live that kind of moment in Davis Cup? Did you think about the difficult moments you might live in tennis? >

GASTON GAUDIO: Every match I play is a new experience. Whether it was in Russia or in Malaga, all that is good experience. Even if some of you ‑ not all of you ‑ criticized me in Malaga. I learned from that and it gave me strength to fight. Today, I enjoy all the more. It's possible that from now on, I will be able to manage better my emotions.

>

Q. There's no doubt that the Argentinian tennis had a period before Vilas and a period after Vilas. Are we going to have to wait 27 years more to live again this kind of celebration on the court? >

GASTON GAUDIO: No. As I said before, Guillermo and David have an incredible tennis. They are both able to win this kind of tournament and they have many years ahead. Just as well he didn't win today, because it would have been very difficult for me because I don't have many years left in tennis. They have many years ahead in tennis.

Action Jackson
06-08-2004, 03:57 AM
http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2004/06/07/1086460239224.html?oneclick=true

Gaudio finds faith at death
June 8, 2004

An emotionally and physically exhausting roller-coaster ride of a French Open final ended with the underdog on top, writes Linda Pearce in Paris.

Guillermo Vilas has never seen a match like it and doubts he will again. This was dramatic, compelling claycourt theatre, in which Gaston Gaudio conjured one of the great grand slam comebacks to upset raging favourite Guillermo Coria in a historic first all-Argentinian major final that will be remembered as much, much more.

Gaudio, so distressed in the dressing room before the match that he asked for advice from famous French Open failure John McEnroe, almost capitulated in pitiful straight sets. Coria, having virtually touched a victory he seemed to believe was his destiny, seized up with nerve-related cramps, yet still found himself with two championship points in an extraordinary fifth set.

"It was a roller-coaster," said Vilas, the 1977 French champion who presented the trophy to 25-year-old Gaudio, his unlikely Argentinian successor. "It was unbelievable. I never saw anything like that in a tennis match. I don't know if you can top this match."

It was the first French Open men's final in 70 years in which a champion had saved a match point but not even Gaudio had believed it could be done.

"When I was match point down, I was thinking this is done, this is over," he said, after prevailing 0-6, 3-6, 6-4, 6-1, 8-6.

Gaudio had not believed in a lot of things, most notably himself. Battered by two infamous Davis Cup defeats and assorted tournament capitulations, he has been helped by a psychologist and a coach, Franco Davin, who worked with him technically, physically and mentally, and advised him to get his personal life in order so that the tennis would follow.

"This means everything," Gaudio said. "Everything. Since I was a kid I was dreaming to be here and win this tournament. Maybe now I'm gonna believe in myself more."

Sunday's first three sets between the two first-time grand slam finalists prepared the stage for the drama that was to follow, as Gaudio started the match paralysed by a similar affliction to that which affected Elena Dementieva on Saturday. He resorted to asking for help from a surprised McEnroe, because "I'm suffering before the match and it didn't even start".

Gaudio took nine attempts to win a game, and at 0-6, 1-5, told Davin he wanted out.

"I was telling him that I want to leave," Gaudio said. "I prefer to lose in the first round and not to be in here in the final and making this, you know?"

Coria had played up to his reputation as the game's best claycourter and the 22-year-old's near-faultless display lasted until the middle of the third set, when Gaudio rode the Mexican wave of a sympathetic crowd that seemed almost embarrassed for him. He relaxed at last.

It was also about that time that Coria first felt the cramps. By the end of the set he was also gasping for air after some long points. The crucial game was the ninth, dropped by Coria from 40-0. He called a medical time-out for the first of several treatments on his left leg at 1-1 in the fourth.

Coria admitted he was exhausted, by anxiety as much as anything, and in conceding the fourth set looked so spent that at any moment he would concede the match as well. But then, at the start of the fifth, Coria danced out to receive like he had been treated with a magic potion.

"Whatever [ATP head trainer] Per Bastholt rubbed him with, I'd like a case immediately," said McEnroe, drily, from his commentary perch. Gaudio, who must have thought the title was almost his, was befuddled.

Was it gamesmanship? "That's right," he said at first in an on-court interview. "I couldn't believe how he was cramping and then in the fifth he was running like hell."

Although Gaudio said later that he accepted the injury as legitimate, Vilas said he could not believe it was cramp. Davin, Coria's former coach, was cynical about the turnaround.

"Something like this happened in the past," Davin told the Herald. "So he probably did it again to upset Gaston on the court and make him lose his concentration."

Gaudio was mentally suspect right until the last point. He sobbed after the semi-finals, saying he was not sure what he was doing at this stage of the French Open, and burst out laughing at critical stages of the fifth set.

"I couldn't believe what was going on," he explained. "It was like a movie, you know."

So weary was Gaudio by the time he earned a match point, after three hours and 31 minutes, that he decided to rip the first backhand he received. A glorious crosscourt winner delivered the trophy he had always coveted.

He stood on the baseline and bellowed for joy, hurling his racquet skywards, and accepted Coria's embrace at the net before embarking on a lap of the court.

There were tears as he went up into the stand to embrace his support crew, and more as he accepted the trophy from Vilas, at whose Buenos Aires club he had first practised as an 11-year-old.

"It's like I touch heaven," said Gaudio, who insisted, graciously, that although this was his moment, next year it would be Coria's. The loser broke down in the interview room when he spoke of the impact of a doping suspension for inadvertently taking a vitamin supplement laced with nandrolone in 2001. This was the title he had wanted ever since, only to be betrayed by his body and his nerve.

He came agonisingly close. When Coria four times broke serve to edge ahead in the fifth set, and twice served for the title, it seemed that there was one player who did not know how to win, and another who was not going to lose, whatever it took. Gaudio found a way. Coria helped him. And an emotional day for Argentina was a remarkable day for tennis.

Action Jackson
06-08-2004, 04:11 AM
http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2004/06/07/1086460200261.html


Gaudio wins dramatic French Open title
June 7, 2004


Paris: Argentina's Gaston Gaudio won the French Open title on Sunday in dramatic circumstances battling back to a 0-6 3-6 6-4 6-1 8-6 win against compatriot Guillermo Coria.

As well as collecting 860,000 euro ($A1.53 million) 25-year-old Gaudio, ranked a modest 44 in the world, becomes the first Argentinian man to win a Grand Slam since Guillermo Vilas won the Australian Open in 1979.

Vilas was also the last Argentine to win here in 1977.

The heartbroken third-seeded Coria had been cruising to victory at one stage wrapping up the first two sets in just an hour and was looking at the possibility of taking the quickest ever final win in the history of the tournament.

But after failing to make sure of victory in the third set, he was forced to call for treatment from the physio on a damaged left thigh at 1-1 in the fourth and from that point on was labouring around the court.

He valiantly carried on, called for more treatment and tried to shake off the problem but had to concede the fourth set as he was reduced to walking pace around the court.

In a tense final set, both players lost their serves twice as the score reached 4-4 with Coria now suffering again, able only to serve rooted to the spot.

Incredibly Coria broke to lead 5-4 but was unable to serve out the match as Gaudio came back to 5-5.

Again Gaudio held on, saving two match points in the 12th game before taking the next to go 7-6.

It was Coria who cracked. He hit a wild forehand to give Gaudio two match points but he only needed one when he unleashed a powerful backhand from the baseline which the exhausted Coria was unable to reach after 3hr 31min on court.

Gaudio's win makes him the fourth lowest ranked player ever to win a Grand Slam title.

Coria had raced through the first set in just 30 minutes breaking serve three times while Gaudio struggled to get a foothold.

Gaudio won just 11 points in the entire first set and only two off the Coria serve which, although lightweight, was always consistent and penetrating.

Gaudio was soon behind 4-1 in the second, when Coria hit a sensational running forehand, and then 5-1 with Coria hitting two aces.

Gaudio rallied to 5-3 with his first break of serve of the day but handed back the advantage, and the second set, in the next game which was wrapped up with a killer drop shot by Coria with the match clock standing at just one hour.

Playing free of nerves, Gaudio made more of a contest of it in the third set breaking to 3-2 before again Coria levelled straight away at 3-3.

After holding to go 4-4, he applauded the crowd for their support, even dropping his racquet to the ground at one stage to clap the packed house who cheered his valiant efforts.

They were on their feet when he came back from 0-40 in the ninth game to break to lead 5-4 and were even rowdier when, incredibly he held to love to clinch the third set after 1hr 54min.

It was then that the complexion of the entire match changed

FrenchLouise
06-08-2004, 08:13 PM
From La Nacion

http://www.lanacion.com.ar/coberturaespecial/canaltenis/notaMostrar.asp?nota_id=608305

"Comienza una nueva vida para mí"
El Gato, que se ubicó hoy entre los diez mejores tenistas del circuito, posó con el trofeo de Roland Garros en las tradicionales fotos de los ganadores en calles de París






Luego de la alegría tras la emotiva final de ayer en Roland Garros, los fríos números también son motivos de sonrisas para Gastón Gaudio.
.
El Gato pegó el gran salto en los rankings de la ATP: ascendió del puesto 44º al 10º en el listado del Sistema de Acceso y avanzó 30 posiciones en la Carrera de Campeones para quedar en el puesto número 4.
.
La agenda del tenista de Temperley, que tenía previsto llegar hoy a la Argentina, tuvo que ser cambiada por los flashes del éxito.
.
A pesar de que tenía previsto arribar lo antes posible para descansar junto a sus familiares y amigos luego de la mejor conquista de su vida, se quedó un día más en París para cumplir con las formalidades que tienen cumplir todos los campeones: las tradicionales fotos que la organización dispone tomar de los ganadores en el centro de la ´Ciudad Luz´, en el Arco de Triunfo y por Champs Elysées.
.
Esta mañana, y para continuar con la cábala que lo acompañó durante todo el torneo, Gaudio se comunicó con Mario Pergolini, conductor del programa de radio ¿Cuál es?.
.
Durante la conversación, el ganador del segundo Grand Slam del año, de compras con un amigo, se mostró feliz e incrédulo por la cantidad de personas que están hablando sobre él en la Argentina, mientras que, en tono de broma, Pergolini le pedía que disputara el certamen de Wimbledon que comenzará en tres semanas en Inglatera.
.
Modelo en París
.
Las fotografías de los organizadores debieron haberse tomado en el día de ayer, pero como la final con Guillermo Coria concluyó muy tarde y luego fue asediado por los periodistas de todo el mundo, los organizadores decidieron postergarla para hoy.
.
Acompañado con una infaltable gorrita de color verde, que no se la sacó pese al pedido de los más de 20 fotógrafos de los medios más importantes del mundo y con la Copa en sus manos, se prestó a la requisitoria de los fotógrafos y camarógrafos.
.
También se acercaron al lugar varios turistas estadounidenses y asiáticos y algunos tuvieron la posibilidad de llevarse de recuerdo una foto con el nuevo rey de París.
.
Emocionado y a su vez sorprendido, Gaudio afirmó que "no me imaginaba que alguna vez iba a estar con este trofeo posando en el Arco de triunfo. Es el camino que hacía todos los días del hotel al estadio. Me asombraba el lío que se armaba con el tránsito".
.
Hizo referencia a que "ahora comienza una nueva vida para mí. Me molesta un poco, ya que todos me quieren hacer notas. He dormido poco y ni siquiera tuve tiempo para ponerme a pensar de lo que logré. No pude ni almorzar".
.
Asimismo agregó que "tampoco tuve tiempo para comunicarme con mi familia, me llamaron mis amigos. No veo la hora de volver. Voy a estar 12 horas solo en el avión".
.
Se mostró sorprendido por la repercusión que alcanzó su triunfo "iba por la calle caminando y de los autos me gritaban. Gaudio, Gaudio. Es todo nuevo para mí, pero me tendré que acostumbrar. Tengo que manejar todo esto. Es el precio que debo pagar".
.
"Este triunfo me da muchas fuerzas para progresar, crecer en mi juego y mantenerme en alto nivel", indicó.
.
El regreso de la nueva estrella del tenis mundial, que se metió por primera vez entre los Top Ten, al ganar ayer el tradicional torneo de Roland Garros, se producirá mañana en las primeras horas.
.
Triunfo de la Argentina
.
A pocas horas de la mayor coronación de Gastón Gaudio, Roberto Carruthers, presidente de Temperley Lawn Tennis Club y ex entrenador del jugador, expresó a LA NACION LINE : "Nos enorgullece el triunfo de Gastón pero yo pienso que ganó el tenis argentino porque tuvimos a cuatro o cinco jugadores en las finales del torneo más importante de polvo de ladrillo."
.
Más allá de la emoción por la victoria del tenista argentino, Carruthers admitió: "El juego de ayer particularmente no me gustó, pero tenemos que entender que las finales no son partidos normales. A lo largo de las dos semanas jugó muy bien."
.
En tanto, ubicó el pico más alto de su juego en el partido contra Lleyton Hewitt. "Le dio un baile que hace tiempo que no veo", exclamó.
.
Al consultarle qué futuro se perfila para Gaudio, opinó: "Esperamos que siga jugando como en Roland Garros y que siga concentrado que era su falla. Va a mantener un muy alto nivel."
.
En este sentido, consideró que esta victoria servirá para paliar la poca confianza que más de una vez evidenció y que interfirió en su calidad de juego: "Ojalá que esto lo fortifique, está mucho mejor, es un Gaudio totalmente cambiado", subrayó.
.
Su ex entrenador recordó los primeros pasos del "Gato" en el tenis y relató: "Venía al club de chiquito, era talentoso en todos los deportes y soñaba con el título de Roland Garros".
.<< Comienzo de la notaLuego de la alegría tras la emotiva final de ayer en Roland Garros, los fríos números también son motivos de sonrisas para Gastón Gaudio.
.
El Gato pegó el gran salto en los rankings de la ATP: ascendió del puesto 44º al 10º en el listado del Sistema de Acceso y avanzó 30 posiciones en la Carrera de Campeones para quedar en el puesto número 4.
.
La agenda del tenista de Temperley, que tenía previsto llegar hoy a la Argentina, tuvo que ser cambiada por los flashes del éxito.
.
A pesar de que tenía previsto arribar lo antes posible para descansar junto a sus familiares y amigos luego de la mejor conquista de su vida, se quedó un día más en París para cumplir con las formalidades que tienen cumplir todos los campeones: las tradicionales fotos que la organización dispone tomar de los ganadores en el centro de la ´Ciudad Luz´, en el Arco de Triunfo y por Champs Elysées.
.
Esta mañana, y para continuar con la cábala que lo acompañó durante todo el torneo, Gaudio se comunicó con Mario Pergolini, conductor del programa de radio ¿Cuál es?.
.
Durante la conversación, el ganador del segundo Grand Slam del año, de compras con un amigo, se mostró feliz e incrédulo por la cantidad de personas que están hablando sobre él en la Argentina, mientras que, en tono de broma, Pergolini le pedía que disputara el certamen de Wimbledon que comenzará en tres semanas en Inglatera.
.
Modelo en París
.
Las fotografías de los organizadores debieron haberse tomado en el día de ayer, pero como la final con Guillermo Coria concluyó muy tarde y luego fue asediado por los periodistas de todo el mundo, los organizadores decidieron postergarla para hoy.
.
Acompañado con una infaltable gorrita de color verde, que no se la sacó pese al pedido de los más de 20 fotógrafos de los medios más importantes del mundo y con la Copa en sus manos, se prestó a la requisitoria de los fotógrafos y camarógrafos.
.
También se acercaron al lugar varios turistas estadounidenses y asiáticos y algunos tuvieron la posibilidad de llevarse de recuerdo una foto con el nuevo rey de París.
.
Emocionado y a su vez sorprendido, Gaudio afirmó que "no me imaginaba que alguna vez iba a estar con este trofeo posando en el Arco de triunfo. Es el camino que hacía todos los días del hotel al estadio. Me asombraba el lío que se armaba con el tránsito".
.
Hizo referencia a que "ahora comienza una nueva vida para mí. Me molesta un poco, ya que todos me quieren hacer notas. He dormido poco y ni siquiera tuve tiempo para ponerme a pensar de lo que logré. No pude ni almorzar".
.
Asimismo agregó que "tampoco tuve tiempo para comunicarme con mi familia, me llamaron mis amigos. No veo la hora de volver. Voy a estar 12 horas solo en el avión".
.
Se mostró sorprendido por la repercusión que alcanzó su triunfo "iba por la calle caminando y de los autos me gritaban. Gaudio, Gaudio. Es todo nuevo para mí, pero me tendré que acostumbrar. Tengo que manejar todo esto. Es el precio que debo pagar".
.
"Este triunfo me da muchas fuerzas para progresar, crecer en mi juego y mantenerme en alto nivel", indicó.
.
El regreso de la nueva estrella del tenis mundial, que se metió por primera vez entre los Top Ten, al ganar ayer el tradicional torneo de Roland Garros, se producirá mañana en las primeras horas.
.
Triunfo de la Argentina
.
A pocas horas de la mayor coronación de Gastón Gaudio, Roberto Carruthers, presidente de Temperley Lawn Tennis Club y ex entrenador del jugador, expresó a LA NACION LINE : "Nos enorgullece el triunfo de Gastón pero yo pienso que ganó el tenis argentino porque tuvimos a cuatro o cinco jugadores en las finales del torneo más importante de polvo de ladrillo."
.
Más allá de la emoción por la victoria del tenista argentino, Carruthers admitió: "El juego de ayer particularmente no me gustó, pero tenemos que entender que las finales no son partidos normales. A lo largo de las dos semanas jugó muy bien."
.
En tanto, ubicó el pico más alto de su juego en el partido contra Lleyton Hewitt. "Le dio un baile que hace tiempo que no veo", exclamó.
.
Al consultarle qué futuro se perfila para Gaudio, opinó: "Esperamos que siga jugando como en Roland Garros y que siga concentrado que era su falla. Va a mantener un muy alto nivel."
.
En este sentido, consideró que esta victoria servirá para paliar la poca confianza que más de una vez evidenció y que interfirió en su calidad de juego: "Ojalá que esto lo fortifique, está mucho mejor, es un Gaudio totalmente cambiado", subrayó.
.
Su ex entrenador recordó los primeros pasos del "Gato" en el tenis y relató: "Venía al club de chiquito, era talentoso en todos los deportes y soñaba con el título de Roland Garros".
.

Action Jackson
06-10-2004, 11:00 PM
This is from his hometown Temperley website

¡Gracias, Gastón!
Temperley en su hora deportiva más gloriosa





No es común lo que sucedió hoy en Roland Garros. Pocas veces en la historia de este Grand Slam, un tenista no preclasificado gana el torneo. Si a esto le sumamos que en 27 años (desde Vilas) ningún argentino había ganado el certamen, y si además, quien resultó triunfador se ubica en el puesto 44° del ranking de la ATP, estamos hablando de una proeza. Gastón Gaudio, al derrotar a Guillermo Coria por 0-6, 3-6, 6-4, 6-1 y 8-6, demostró que está para grandes cosas. Dio vuelta un partido que parecía definido en el segundo set, y jugó a partir de allí un partido vibrante, quizás el mejor de todo el certamen.

Nadie pudo enfrentar con éxito su entrega, su arrolladora confianza y su probada técnica. Con un estadio repleto, un puñado de argentinos se dirimió entre los dos compatriotas que hoy hicieron historia por ser la primera final de un Grand Slam entre 'gauchos', como nos bautizó la prensa internacional para la ocasión.

Al finalizar el encuentro, Gastón saludó al público, feliz, y al ser consultado por la TV francesa sobre su parecer luego de ganar, sólo respondió: 'Yo no gané. No puede ser'. Así, espontáneo, se quebró cuando recordó a su familia y a su novia, al dirigir la palabra luego de recibir la copa de manos de Guillermo Vilas, en un momento memorable del deporte argentino. Gastón nació el 9 de Diciembre de 1978.

Vivió en Temperley toda su infancia. Aquí comenzó a jugar tenis y se hizo conocido. Temperley vive con él su hora deportiva más gloriosa. Las instancias del cotejo fueron seguidas minuto a minuto en toda la ciudad. El Temperley Lawn Tennis Club y el Club Atlético Temperley, ambas instituciones donde el 'Gato' fue alumno de tenis, se paralizaron para vivir, sufrir y disfrutar el encuentro. Se sufrió, sí, pero ahora todo es dicha. Gracias, Gastón, por el tenis, por Argentina, y por Temperley.

The caveman translation

Thanks, Gastón!
Temperley in its more glorious sport hour


It is not common what happened today in Roland Garros. Not very often in the history of this Grand Slam, a preclassified tennis player does not gain the match. If to this we added to him that in 27 years (from Vilas) no Argentinean had gained the contest, and if in addition, that was triunfador is located in the position 44° of the ranking of the ATP, we are speaking of a feat. Gastón Gaudio, when defeating to Guillermo Coria by 0-6, 3-6, 6-4, 6-1 and 8-6, demonstrated that it is for great things.

It gave to return a party that seemed defined in the second Seth, and played there from a vibrant party, perhaps the best one of all the contest. Nobody could successfully face its delivery, its sweeping confidence and its technical proving. With a filled stage, a handful of Argentineans was dissolved both between compatriots who today made history be the first end of a Grand Slam between ' gauchos', as she baptized the international press to us for the occasion.

When finalizing the encounter, Gastón greeted the public, happy, and to the being consulted by the French TV on his to seem after winning, only respondio ': ' I did not win. Ser' cannot. Thus, spontaneous, one became broken when it remembered to its family and her fiancèe, when directing the word after receiving the glass of hands of Guillermo Vilas, in a while memorable of the Argentine sport. Gastón was born the 9 of December of 1978.

Its childhood lived in Temperley all. Here it began to play tennis and one became well-known. Temperley lives with him its more glorious sport hour. The instances of I collate were followed minute by minute in all the city. The Temperley Lawn Tennis Club and the Athletic Club Temperley , both institutions where the ' Gató was tennis student, became paralyzed to live, to undergo and to enjoy the encounter. It was taken place, yes, but now everything is said. Thanks, Gastón, by tennis, by Argentina, and Temperley.

FrenchLouise
06-10-2004, 11:51 PM
LA NACION
Después de Roland Garros
Gaudio: "Hoy disfruto de todas las cosas"
Está en el centro de la escena y goza de su momento más deseado luego de la consagración en París






Autógrafos por aquí y por allá. Reportajes por doquier, producciones especiales, cientos de pedidos de notas... Gastón Gaudio está en el centro de la escena tras su victoria en Roland Garros. Y en medio del salto al reconocimiento, intenta gozar al máximo de su mejor hora. "Hoy disfruto de todas las cosas porque es todo muy cercano; por ahí, cuando pasen los días y esté cansado, no sé cómo será. No estoy acostumbrado a ésto, pero le pongo voluntad, me la banco", dice el Gato, en una charla con LA NACION. Vestido con un pulover gris y negro, pantalón marrón y una gorra gris, Gaudio bebe un té de hierbas y espera otra pregunta.
.
-En París, levantaste la copa de los Mosqueteros, pero aquí llegaste con una réplica...
.
-La verdad, no sabía que la tenía que devolver. Yo pensé que me llevaba la grande, ya la imaginaba en casa, la iba a mirar todos los días (se ríe)... La chiquita es igual, pero tiene otro significado.
.
-¿Qué momentos te quedaron marcados de Roland Garros?
.
(Piensa un largo rato) -El quinto set del partido con Novak, que fue durísimo -por la segunda rueda-, cuando le dije a Davin: este partido lo voy a ganar cómo sea, aunque estaba terriblemente complicado. Después, la noche previa a la final; le dije a Franco: estoy contento porque es el último día y nos vamos de acá. No aguanto un minuto más la presión de estar quince días pensando todo el tiempo que mañana tengo que jugar o hacer otra cosa y no poder irme a dormir tranquilo y relajado; estoy más contento por eso que por estar en la final. Y los match-points con Coria.
.
-¿Los bajones anímicos quedaron definitivamente atrás?
.
-No, es algo normal. Cualquiera puede tener bajones si pasa por situaciones difíciles. Quizá no tengo tantos como antes, pero los estados anímicos son así; a veces voy a estar bien, a veces mal. No queda otra.
.
-Enrique Morea, el presidente de la AAT, estuvo en Roland Garros. ¿En algún momento se acercó a pedirte disculpas por lo que te dijo en Málaga? ("lo de este chico da lástima")
.
-No. Se acercó una vez a Coria, y como yo estaba al lado, me saludó.
.
-¿Querés volver a jugar la Copa Davis?
.
-Sí, cómo no la voy a querer jugar. Desde que me llamaron siempre fui. Es el orgullo que tengo y es por lo único que me hace vibrar el tenis.
.
-¿Y no temés que te pueda pasar lo mismo que en España?
.
-Pero eso le puede pasar a cualquiera. Y perdí contra el N° 1 y el N° 6 del mundo, ya lo dije mil veces.
.
-¿Quién querés que sea el nuevo capitán?
.
-No importa. Se hizo una votación (en Montecarlo, que derivó en una carta a la AAT) y salieron los dos que fueron propuestos (Mancini y Jaite).
.
-¿En qué momento de tu vida pensaste: el tenis es lo que me gusta, esto es lo que quiero hacer?
.
-A los 16 o 17 años, cuando mi papá (Norberto) se enfermó. Ese fue el punto de partida.
.
-¿Y alguna vez te arrepentiste de esa decisión?
.
-Mil veces... Cada vez que se pierde un partido, la pasás mal y pensás: hubiese ido a la facultad, a estudiar tranquilo, estar con mis amigos, ser un pibe normal, no estar pasando por estas cosas... Todo eso se te ocurre. Muchas veces me arrepentí.
.
-¿Cuál fue el momento más difícil en tu carrera?
.
-Fueron muchos, pero creo que lo más duro es el principio, cuando todavía no sabés si vas a llegar o no, cuando sos chico y dudás, a ver si tenés nivel o estás perdiendo el tiempo. Eso es lo más duro. Y encima, no está la madurez para enfrentarlo.
.
-De todos los elogios y cuestionamientos recibidos, ¿cuáles fueron los que más recordás?
.
-Todos me llegan, pero lo que más me importa es lo que me dice mi familia.
.
Por José Luis Domínguez
De la Redacción de LA NACION
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La visita de un ídolo: Bochini
.
En el hotel Emperador, donde volvió a reunirse con la prensa, Gastón Gaudio recibió la visita de Enrique Bochini. Considerado uno de los mejores futbolistas de la historia de Independiente, el Bocha se acercó a saludar al campeón de Roland Garros, reconocido fana de los Rojos, y le obsequió una camiseta autografiada con su apellido, mientras que Gaudio le regaló una raqueta.
.
"Esto no tiene precio, y viene de parte de un campeón mundial", dijo un emocionado Gaudio, que también recordó que cada vez que Bochini lo fue a ver jugar por la Copa Davis, no perdió ni un set. Gaudio, además, será homenajeado con la entrega de una plaqueta mañana por la noche, cuando Independiente reciba a Talleres, por la 17ª fecha del Clausura.
.<< Comienzo de la notaAutógrafos por aquí y por allá. Reportajes por doquier, producciones especiales, cientos de pedidos de notas... Gastón Gaudio está en el centro de la escena tras su victoria en Roland Garros. Y en medio del salto al reconocimiento, intenta gozar al máximo de su mejor hora. "Hoy disfruto de todas las cosas porque es todo muy cercano; por ahí, cuando pasen los días y esté cansado, no sé cómo será. No estoy acostumbrado a ésto, pero le pongo voluntad, me la banco", dice el Gato, en una charla con LA NACION. Vestido con un pulover gris y negro, pantalón marrón y una gorra gris, Gaudio bebe un té de hierbas y espera otra pregunta.
.
-En París, levantaste la copa de los Mosqueteros, pero aquí llegaste con una réplica...
.
-La verdad, no sabía que la tenía que devolver. Yo pensé que me llevaba la grande, ya la imaginaba en casa, la iba a mirar todos los días (se ríe)... La chiquita es igual, pero tiene otro significado.
.
-¿Qué momentos te quedaron marcados de Roland Garros?
.
(Piensa un largo rato) -El quinto set del partido con Novak, que fue durísimo -por la segunda rueda-, cuando le dije a Davin: este partido lo voy a ganar cómo sea, aunque estaba terriblemente complicado. Después, la noche previa a la final; le dije a Franco: estoy contento porque es el último día y nos vamos de acá. No aguanto un minuto más la presión de estar quince días pensando todo el tiempo que mañana tengo que jugar o hacer otra cosa y no poder irme a dormir tranquilo y relajado; estoy más contento por eso que por estar en la final. Y los match-points con Coria.
.
-¿Los bajones anímicos quedaron definitivamente atrás?
.
-No, es algo normal. Cualquiera puede tener bajones si pasa por situaciones difíciles. Quizá no tengo tantos como antes, pero los estados anímicos son así; a veces voy a estar bien, a veces mal. No queda otra.
.
-Enrique Morea, el presidente de la AAT, estuvo en Roland Garros. ¿En algún momento se acercó a pedirte disculpas por lo que te dijo en Málaga? ("lo de este chico da lástima")
.
-No. Se acercó una vez a Coria, y como yo estaba al lado, me saludó.
.
-¿Querés volver a jugar la Copa Davis?
.
-Sí, cómo no la voy a querer jugar. Desde que me llamaron siempre fui. Es el orgullo que tengo y es por lo único que me hace vibrar el tenis.
.
-¿Y no temés que te pueda pasar lo mismo que en España?
.
-Pero eso le puede pasar a cualquiera. Y perdí contra el N° 1 y el N° 6 del mundo, ya lo dije mil veces.
.
-¿Quién querés que sea el nuevo capitán?
.
-No importa. Se hizo una votación (en Montecarlo, que derivó en una carta a la AAT) y salieron los dos que fueron propuestos (Mancini y Jaite).
.
-¿En qué momento de tu vida pensaste: el tenis es lo que me gusta, esto es lo que quiero hacer?
.
-A los 16 o 17 años, cuando mi papá (Norberto) se enfermó. Ese fue el punto de partida.
.
-¿Y alguna vez te arrepentiste de esa decisión?
.
-Mil veces... Cada vez que se pierde un partido, la pasás mal y pensás: hubiese ido a la facultad, a estudiar tranquilo, estar con mis amigos, ser un pibe normal, no estar pasando por estas cosas... Todo eso se te ocurre. Muchas veces me arrepentí.
.
-¿Cuál fue el momento más difícil en tu carrera?
.
-Fueron muchos, pero creo que lo más duro es el principio, cuando todavía no sabés si vas a llegar o no, cuando sos chico y dudás, a ver si tenés nivel o estás perdiendo el tiempo. Eso es lo más duro. Y encima, no está la madurez para enfrentarlo.
.
-De todos los elogios y cuestionamientos recibidos, ¿cuáles fueron los que más recordás?
.
-Todos me llegan, pero lo que más me importa es lo que me dice mi familia.
.
Por José Luis Domínguez
De la Redacción de LA NACION
.
La visita de un ídolo: Bochini
.
En el hotel Emperador, donde volvió a reunirse con la prensa, Gastón Gaudio recibió la visita de Enrique Bochini. Considerado uno de los mejores futbolistas de la historia de Independiente, el Bocha se acercó a saludar al campeón de Roland Garros, reconocido fana de los Rojos, y le obsequió una camiseta autografiada con su apellido, mientras que Gaudio le regaló una raqueta.
.
"Esto no tiene precio, y viene de parte de un campeón mundial", dijo un emocionado Gaudio, que también recordó que cada vez que Bochini lo fue a ver jugar por la Copa Davis, no perdió ni un set. Gaudio, además, será homenajeado con la entrega de una plaqueta mañana por la noche, cuando Independiente reciba a Talleres, por la 17ª fecha del Clausura.
.
Gaudio tells of how he is enjoying everything as he does not know what the future will be and is drinking herbal tea (like Viggo!) and still wearing his grey cap. He says that he did not know he was not getting the original Coupe des Mousquetaires but only a small replica. The most memorable moments of Roland Garros: the fifth set against Novak, then the night before the final, when he told his coach how happy he was that it was soon over as he could not bear the pressure any longer, and then the match points against Coria.
The reporter asks him if Enrique Morea, the president of the AAT, who said in Malaga (Davis Cup, Spain vs Argentina) that Gaudio was pitiful, and was at Roland Garros, if he apologised: he didn't.
He says he is always and always has been willing to play the Davis Cup. "What happened in Spain can happen to anyone. I lost against the no1 and 6 in the world, as I've said a thousand times".
The moment he understood tennis was his life: around 16 or 17, when his father fell ill. A decision he regretted "thousands of times, with every defeat", recalling how he longed to be a "pibe normal", go to college and hang out with his friends.
The hardest moment in his career? Not knowing if he was going to make it. The congratulations that really mattered following his victory: those of his family.

rassklovn
06-11-2004, 10:44 AM
http://www.eurosport.com/home/pages/V4/L0/S57/E6182/sport_Lng0_Spo57_Evt6182_Sto598795.shtml

Argentina hails new hero

Watch out Diego Maradona - there's a new sporting hero in town. French Open winner Gaston Gaudio has joined Argentina's pantheon of sporting greats after his thrilling victory over Guillermo Coria on Sunday. "Gaudio touches heaven in Paris," beamed one newspaper on Monday, picturing the ecstatic 25-year-old.


ROLAND GARROS: Gaudio back from brink


Argentina's leading sports daily hailed "Gaudios" - punning on Dios, the Spanish word for God - a nickname reserved until now for Maradona in the soccer-mad country.

Unseeded Gaudio clawed back from two sets down to take the French Open crown after number three seed Coria fell foul to nerves and cramps, triggering an outpouring of emotion back home.

"Roland Gaudio," said Clarin's special tennis pullout supplement, renaming Roland Garros as Argentina's own.

"The King of Paris," exclaimed La Nacion.

The last Argentine to win the French Open men's singles was Guillermo Vilas in 1977 and it was the country's first men's singles grand slam win in 25 years.

"We had to wait 8,922 days for a countryman to return to the top of one of the four major men's tournaments," said La Nacion.

But Coria's defeat meant the victory was bittersweet.

In his hometown of Venado Tuerto supporters had uncorked the champagne early as the 22-year-old appeared on track for a three-set whitewash.

"Venado Tuerto is suffering," said Clarin.

Photographs of an ecstatic Gaudio gave way to pictures of a disconsolate Coria and his aghast wife Carla.

"What happened?" asked Ole.

Action Jackson
06-11-2004, 07:42 PM
This is courtesy of some very nice Nalbandian fans in Argentina.

Gaudio was on the programe CQC which is a humor program yesterday and he was asked, if David had won the SF, who would have cheered for? David or Coria? and he said David.

Then he made some comment not giving a shit about Coria's cramps. That he wanted to win it no matter what, he wouldn't have minded if he had drop dead in the middle of the court.

That's the atitude I love to hear.

jazz_girl
06-12-2004, 12:28 AM
I'll give you more details on that: in that tv programme all the hosts wear suits and dark glasses and Gastón co-hosted wearing the same outfit. Here's the link of the website of that tv show, maybe they'll upload a clip from the show later on, they always do it ;)
http://www.cqc.tv/

jazz_girl
06-12-2004, 12:33 AM
Here are some links that you might enjoy:
http://www.uol.com.ar/especiales/extra/html/deportes/200406090000/?h0m3=T6

tommy_girl
06-12-2004, 03:35 AM
I'll give you more details on that: in that tv programme all the hosts wear suits and dark glasses and Gastón co-hosted wearing the same outfit. Here's the link of the website of that tv show, maybe they'll upload a clip from the show later on, they always do it ;)
http://www.cqc.tv/

i wish i could see him in suit.. i tried the link but i just cant understand spanish.. wish i could... do u have some pictures or screenshots of him in suit?

chelsea
06-12-2004, 06:21 AM
:wavey: thanks for the links, jazz_girl :)

But I did't see the clip with Gato in suit either :sad:

chelsea
06-12-2004, 06:23 AM
Gaudio will play in Kitzbuehel

KITZBUEHEL (Austria): The 2004 French Open winner, Gaston Gaudio of Argentina, will play at the Generali Open in Kitzbuehel, organisers announced Thursday.

Gaudio, who won the Paris title in a five-set thriller against countryman Guillermo Coria last Sunday, agreed play at the $1 million tournament, held from July 17 to 25. “We are very proud to have Gaston come to Kitzbuehel. He will certainly be our main attraction,” tournament director Hellmuth Kuechenmeister said. The 25-year-old, currently number ten in the ATP world rankings, will most likely be seeded No 2 behind 2003 Australian Open finalist Rainer Schuettler of Germany. Last year, Gaudio was eliminated in the quarterfinals, going down to Spanish clay court specialist Gustavo Lopez in three sets 2-6, 7-5, 5-7. Defending Kitzbuehel champion Coria canceled his start, “because he wants to fully focus on the Olympics,” Kuechenmeister explained. Other star players, who have already agreed to play at the Generali Open, are three-time event winner Albert Costa of Spain, 2003 finalist Nicolas Massu of Chile and Austrian No 1 Juergen Melzer.

www.dailytimes.com

Action Jackson
06-12-2004, 08:56 AM
Here are some links that you might enjoy:
http://www.uol.com.ar/especiales/extra/html/deportes/200406090000/?h0m3=T6

Thanks for the link Jazz, luckily I had a friend of mine here to translate for me. It was good to see him looking relaxed and happy.

They had a poll on this link. Which one to vote and these were the choices. Where was number 5 all of the above.

Cuál es el punto fuerte de Gaudio?
Su talento
Su mentalidad
Su carisma
Su humildad

bovenbuuf
06-12-2004, 09:47 AM
Gaudio decides today if he goes to Wimbledon
La nacion 12/6

This weekend will be clear if two of the main Argentine tennis players will participate in Wimbledon, the third Grand Slam of the year.
In the next hours the situation of Gastón Gaudio can be solved, that drags an ailment in a heel from its victory in Paris. "Yes all the studies aretaken by him. Tomorrow (for today) we are going away to reunite, but we do not want to hurry to take one decisión", said Frank Davin, the trainer of the champion of Roland Garros

Gaudio was distinguished yesterday in the Vilas Club, where he received a picture with the cover of the edition of last Monday of LA Nacion, in which his consecration in the French Open stands out, after winning in five sets form Guillermo Coria in a dramatic end.

....

chelsea
06-12-2004, 05:37 PM
Gaudio withdraws from Wimbledon

Saturday, June 12, 2004

(06-12) 09:08 PDT WIMBLEDON, England (AP) --

French Open champion Gaston Gaudio pulled out of Wimbledon on Saturday because of a foot injury.

Gaudio has played at Wimbledon five times, but has never made it past the second round.

Wimbledon referee Alan Mills said Gaudio announced his withdrawal, but didn't specify the nature of the foot injury.

Justine Henin-Hardenne, the top-ranked female player, and No. 2 Kim Clijsters had already pulled out. Henin-Hardenne has a viral illness, while Clijsters has a wrist injury.

Last Sunday at Roland Garros, the unseeded Gaudio came back from two sets down to beat third-seeded Guillermo Coria 0-6, 3-6, 6-4, 6-1, 8-6 in the first all-Argentine final at a Grand Slam. No Argentine had won the French Open since Guillermo Vilas in 1977.

Wimbledon begins June 21.

Action Jackson
06-14-2004, 08:11 AM
Gaudio kommer till Swedish Open

7. juni 2004 11:23

Segraren i Franska Öppna, Gaston Gaudio, kommer till Swedish Open i sommar. "Det är så att man ryser", säger turenringschefen Thomas Wallén.

Efter triumfen i Paris har Gaston Gaudio seglat upp som ett av de hetaste tennisnamnen i världen. Nu är det klart att han kommer till Swedish Open i Båstad som börjar den 5 juli.

- Det är så att man ryser, att han kommer till Båstad, det är ju ytterligare en bekräftelse att vi har en av de bästa grustävlingarna i världen, säger turneringschefen Thomas Wallén till TT.

Även Carlos Moya kommer till Båstad, liksom de högst rankade svenskarna. Men det är Gaudio som blir det nya affishnamnet för Swedish Open.

- Han har spelat turneringen i Gstaad tidigare men hörde genom sina kompisar att det var roligare i Båstad och valde i stället att anmäla sig till Båstad, vilket vi naturligtvis är oerhört glada för, fortsätter Wallén.


Translation

French Open champion Gaston Gaudio is coming to the Swedish Open this summer. “It is so that one shivers with excitement” said tournament director Thomas Wallén

After the triumph in Paris, Gaston Gaudio has become one of the hottest tennis players in the world. Now it’s clear that he is coming to the Swedish Open in Båstad, which begins on the 5th of July.

“It is so that one shivers with excitement, that he is coming to Båstad, it is certainly a confirmation that we have one of the best claycourt tournaments in the world” said tournament director Thomas Wallén to TT.

Also Carlos Moya is coming to Båstad, as are the highest ranked Swedes, but Gaudio has become the new main attraction for the Swedish Open.

He has previously played the tournament in Gstaad, but he heard from his friends, that it was more pleasant in Båstad and chose instead to commit himself to Båstad, which naturally we are tremendously happy for, continued Wallén.

Action Jackson
06-14-2004, 08:54 AM
I must thank the great people from the Mariano Zabaleta board for this and these are words from Zabaleta about Gaston.

http://www.clarin.com/diario/2004/06/08/deportes/d-05501.htm

Alguien como él

Mariano Zabaleta. TENISTA


A Gastón lo conozco desde los diez años. Es un amigo como los amigos que tengo de toda la vida. Con él o con Juan Chela la amistad va más allá del tenis.

La verdad que es increíble lo que le pasó porque ganar Roland Garros es el sueño de todos. Cuando lo vi llorar por la televisión, yo también lloré. Y a mi vieja se le escaparon muchas lágrimas, estaba muy emocionada porque lo quiere como a un hijo.

De chicos compartimos muchas cosas y él fue muy bueno conmigo en momentos difíciles. Pongo un ejemplo: un día se sentó y me dijo "estás haciendo mal tal o cual cosa". O era capaz de decirme "tomá, leete este libro".

Ayer estuvimos hablando por celular y la única frase que decíamos los dos durante mas o menos cinco minutos era "boludo, la verdad que no lo puedo creer".

El está más loco que yo pero me hizo quererlo mal. Es difícil encontrar en este deporte que es tan competitivo una persona como él.

English

I have known Gastón since I was 10 years old. He is a friend like the friends I have of all my life. With him or Juan Chela, friendship goes far away from tennis.

The truth is that what happenned to him is unbelievable because winning Roland Garros is everyone of us' dream. When I saw him crying on TV, I cried too. And my mother dropped a lot of tears; she was deeply touched because she loves him like a son.

When we were kids we shared a lot of things and he was very good to me in those very difficult moments. For example, one day he sat and said "you are wrong doing this or that thing". Or he was able to tell me "here you are, read this book".

Yesterday we have been talking by cell phone and the only thing that we said both of us during five minutes more or less was "actually I can't believe it".

He is crazier than me, but he made me love him a lot. It's difficult to find in this so competitive sport a person like him.

lsy
06-14-2004, 04:50 PM
That's a wonderful frienships they have there, Gaudio and Zabaleta. Really nice.

gravity
06-14-2004, 09:56 PM
Thanks for sharing the article GWH. Nice to hear not everyone in Argentina is disrespecting Gaudio's achievements at Roland Garros. ;)

Action Jackson
06-15-2004, 10:10 AM
Thanks for sharing the article GWH. Nice to hear not everyone in Argentina is disrespecting Gaudio's achievements at Roland Garros. ;)

Not everyone is bitter in Argentina.

Trolls Need Love Too
06-16-2004, 03:57 PM
Comeback kid Gaudio conquers Paris in thriller

Gaudio 0-6, 3-6, 6-4, 6-1, 8-6 Corria

Stephen Bierley at Roland Garros
Monday June 7, 2004
The Guardian

Gaston Gaudio spiralled his racket high into the blue Parisian early evening skies and threw back his head in the joyous wonderment of it all.
Even as he celebrated his remarkable 0-6, 3-6, 6-4, 6-1, 8-6 victory in the French Open final his fellow Argentinian Guillermo Coria, the overwhelming favourite, slumped into his chair and twice thrashed his own racket into the red Roland Garros clay, raging with bitter frustration.

For two sets Coria had played almost faultless tennis, brilliantly demonstrating exactly why he has been the outstanding player on this surface this year, with only one previous defeat.

Poor Gaudio was all but engulfed, and with Coria 40-0 up on his serve at 4-4 in the third set all appeared lost. Crucially, though, Gaudio broke back, Coria's world was turned upside down and the man who wanted the title almost too much was beaten.

It was midway through that third set that Coria's troubles began. Both legs began to cramp up, although it was not immediately obvious, save at the very end of the set when he barely attempted to get back Gaudio's serve.

"It cost me a lot when he came back to 4-4. I absolutely knew I had to win that third set," he admitted.

At 1-1 in the fourth Coria called for the trainer Per Bastholt and had his legs massaged. There were no huge grimaces from the 22-year-old world No3 but he was clearly worried.

As soon as he returned it was obvious the trouble was serious. He could barely serve and was immediately broken with the set slipping away from him with the swiftness of a man being swept out to sea on a rip tide.

Gaudio, 25, who with his world ranking of No44 is the fourth-lowest ranked man to win a grand slam championship in the Open era, could scarcely believe what was happening.

In the third set he had drawn deep on the inspiration of the centre-court crowd to salvage some modicum of pride. Now, against everything that had seemed possible, the title was a set away with his opponent tottering around like a drunkard.

Tennis finals rarely deliver a truly fitting climax to a two-week grand slam tournament. This one had so much drama that it simply left everyone drained and trembling.

The Coria - Tim Henman semi-final on Friday had been a marvellous match of fluctuating fortunes; this one was tipped on its head.

At the end of the fourth set Coria eagerly devoured a banana and drank from an unlabelled cola bottle, desperately attempting to get some nutrients and sugar into his body.

Coria was banned in 2001 for testing positive for the steroid nandrolone, although a tennis anti-doping tribunal considered he was unaware of the contamination and the ban was reduced to seven months.

However, since the more recent outbreak of nandrolone- related problems, during which Greg Rusedski tested positive but was later absolved, all the players have been avoiding taking supplements, with Coria particularly fearful of taking any unnecessary risks. He so badly wanted to erase the past that it hurt.

"I wanted to win this tournament and get revenge against those who gave me those contaminated vitamins," said Coria afterwards, the tears streaming down his cheeks. "I wanted to bring a lot of happiness to my family because of the way they supported me through those difficult times.

"I came here thinking it was the opportunity to show everybody what I was able to do. I really wanted to empty myself of the past but I wasn't able to do so. But I will be back. I have promised myself I will win this tournament."

As Gaudio prepared to serve at the start of the fifth set, Coria jogged and bounced on the balls of his feet, trying desperately to lift himself.

Coria is recognised as the quickest player in the world; without this speed he was a cat without claws. But extraordinarily Gaudio lost his serve, his mind and body riddled with nerves. He took deep gulps of breath and water as the two crossed at the umpire's chair, with Coria hastily munching down another banana.

Within a couple of minutes the match had swung again with Coria dropping his service to love. Surely Gaudio would stamp on his neck this time, but no. The collywobbles consumed him again and Coria, as improbably as anything that has happened in a fortnight of upsets, stretched out to a 3-1 lead.

Coria was still not moving properly and his serve was merely functional but Gaudio seemed incapable of taking advantage. Even having managed to get back level at 4-4 he stumbled, leaving Coria to serve for the title at 5-4. But he missed three forehands, Gaudio fired a cross-court winner and all was level again.

The tension was all but unbearable, with the majority of the crowd firmly on Gaudio's side. Coria's parents, Oscar and Graciela, thumped their chests as their weary son forced his body forward, breaking the Gaudio serve again in a 16-point 11th game. So, for a second time, he served for the match and this time had two match points.

Both were missed and, perhaps for the first time, Gaudio finally believed he could win. After a crisp service game it was left to Coria to serve to stay in the match. He failed, Gaudio finally nailing him with a flashing cross-court backhand, one of the finest in tennis though not seen before in this level of tennis.

Nobody had expected the self-effacing Gaudio to defeat his other compatriot, David Nalbandian, in the semi-finals. The furthest he had progressed in any grand slam tournament was the last 16 at Roland Garros in 2002, the same year that he won his two previous titles, both on clay, in Barcelona and Mallorca.

"I don't know what to say, it is too much. This is like a movie for me," Gaudio said, tears streaming down his cheeks. "Thanks to all of you, the crowd. Thanks to you I managed to fight more and come back. I touched heaven."

Guillermo Vilas, the French Open champion in 1977, and the only male Argentinian to have won a grand slam title before, revealed afterwards that mid-way through the second set Gaudio had said: "I want to leave. I've had it. I can't believe I'm playing as badly as this." He was glad in the end he stayed.

Gaudio - Coria

66% 1st serve % 65 %

2 Aces 5

9 Double faults 6

55 Unforced errors 54

36 Winners 38

73% Break points won 56%

148 Total points won 137

Tricky_Forehand
06-16-2004, 07:27 PM
Great article!!! :D

chelsea
06-16-2004, 10:40 PM
When I saw him crying on TV, I cried too. And my mother dropped a lot of tears; she was deeply touched because she loves him like a son.

He is crazier than me, but he made me love him a lot. It's difficult to find in this so competitive sport a person like him.

How sweet of Mariano and his mom! :angel:

So nice to read about the great friendship they share. Thanks for posting it, George! :wavey:

Action Jackson
06-17-2004, 04:14 AM
How sweet of Mariano and his mom! :angel:

So nice to read about the great friendship they share. Thanks for posting it, George! :wavey:

I have only good things to say about Zabaleta and that was before I found this little article, and he has gone up even more. I mean I have argued with just everyone here at one point, but Zaba is a classy guy, and they were together when they first started on tour and when they went through the shit with the Argentine federation not helping them initially, so it just adds to his character.

gretel
06-17-2004, 04:38 AM
Chela y Zabaleta are Gastón'n best friends in tennis circuit.

Trolls Need Love Too
06-17-2004, 04:44 AM
Franco Squillari is another one of Gaston's best friends on the circuit.

Action Jackson
06-17-2004, 10:59 AM
This is part of an article that was written in the Australian tennis magazine reviewing the French Open, so I just typed the bit about Gaudio here.

The Argentine Arrival

By Alan Trengrove

The Argentine Armada were in full force at the French Open, but in a surprising twist, it was unseeded Gaston Gaudio who sailed off with the Grand Slam goods.

It looked like having all the hallmarks of a fascinating fairytale… Guillermo Coria, a reformed wrongdoer, recently married, his wedding ring suspended on a chain round his neck, was poised to become the first Argentine to win the French Open since Guillermo Vilas 27 years ago.

But compatriot Gaston Gaudio had a good story-line of his own. Unheralded and unseeded, with a history of nervous collapses on big occasions, the 25-year-old from Temperley sprang one of the biggest surprises in the history of the tournament by beating the No.3 seed in an extraordinary final.

In a dramatically fluctuating climax, Gaudio finally overcame his jitters, which had driven him to despair in the first two sets, and defeated Coria three years his junior by 0-6, 3-6 6-4, 6-1 8-6 in 3 hours and 31 minutes.

Leading by two sets to love and by 4-3 in the third, the favourite had been two games from a straight sets victory. Then he’d seemed doomed when stricken by leg cramps early in the fourth. For the remainder of that set, Coria could neither run nor keep his shots in the court, but gradually he responded to the trainer’s treatment. In an emotional and topsy-turvy fifth set, he twice served for the match and held two match points.

The money that Gaudio had spent in consulting a psychologist to help him overcome nerves and be less uptight in close matches has paid off. The most talented shot-maker of all the Argentine players , he’d never before been beyond a Grand Slam fourth round. Now, at long last, he has achieved his potential.

Because of Gaudio’s patchy record, the Argentine tennis federation had never supported him as it had, for instance Coria and David Nalbandian. His parents and friends paid most of his expenses. But early this year he was so depressed he considered retirement. His ranking was No.44 at the start of the tournament.

The French crowd didn’t hide its preference for Gaudio, who had eliminated Lleyton Hewitt and Nalbandian in earlier matches. They lifted his morale in his darkest moments by chanting his name.

RogiFan88
06-17-2004, 05:50 PM
I agree Gaston is the most talented shotmaker of the Argies. Coria is consistent, determined and rarely makes UEs and he'll do almost anything to win! Nalbers, well, he's my brutish player, up there in terms of greatness but not quite -- he doesn't give up, which is a big plus, his tennis just doesn't do it for me as far as "wow-factor" is concerned!! [but then you know who "wows" me most... and it ain't no Argie!!]. Nice article!

Trolls Need Love Too
06-18-2004, 05:11 AM
That was a great article thanks George.

Action Jackson
06-18-2004, 05:46 AM
I agree Gaston is the most talented shotmaker of the Argies. Coria is consistent, determined and rarely makes UEs and he'll do almost anything to win! Nalbers, well, he's my brutish player, up there in terms of greatness but not quite -- he doesn't give up, which is a big plus, his tennis just doesn't do it for me as far as "wow-factor" is concerned!! [but then you know who "wows" me most... and it ain't no Argie!!]. Nice article!

It's good that you know that Gaston is the most talented shotmaker of the Argies, and I will forgive your comments about Nalbandian. :)

RogiFan88
06-18-2004, 04:05 PM
It's good that you know that Gaston is the most talented shotmaker of the Argies, and I will forgive your comments about Nalbandian. :)

:rolls: Yep, I love El Gato's "reves" the most! :lol:

:kiss: Thanks, George! Of course you know [and so does Becca] that I harbour a secret "crush" on Nalby -- that's why I tease him so much! ;)

Tell me, what city is Zabaleta from? Did you say he's also fr a fairly well-off background?

TennisLurker
06-18-2004, 07:08 PM
zabaleta is from tandil

RogiFan88
06-18-2004, 07:18 PM
Gracias, TL! Pero donde esta Tandil?? Je je... no conosco Argentina.

He visto una pelicula argentina ayer, de 1997, La Furia -- interesante!

Action Jackson
06-19-2004, 03:05 AM
Zabaleta is from Tandil, 5 hours south of BA. He is from the same town as Guillermo Perez Roldan and his dad was a rugby player and from a well-off background.

RogiFan88
06-19-2004, 03:09 AM
Gracias, George! You always know the info! So I guess you wish you were going to Bastad? Sounds like a good tourney and I'm sure that Rogi is thankful Gaston is NOT playing Gstaad this yr even tho he beat him last yr. Two nice clay tourneys -- one day... but I still want to go to Barcelona first to see the Armada and the Legion!

Action Jackson
06-19-2004, 03:20 AM
Gracias, George! You always know the info! So I guess you wish you were going to Bastad? Sounds like a good tourney and I'm sure that Rogi is thankful Gaston is NOT playing Gstaad this yr even tho he beat him last yr. Two nice clay tourneys -- one day... but I still want to go to Barcelona first to see the Armada and the Legion!

I am very pissed off about not going to Båstad, considering that I told some people that they should play there, and it seems the message has got around. It's actually the best non Masters event along with Barcelona, though the cutoff was lower here, I just hope everyone apart from Younes shows up.

Gaston will like Båstad, well he would rather that than the USA, and the irony is the years I went weren't as good as Båstad, though I was there when Mats was the man, so I can't complain too much.

TennisLurker
06-20-2004, 12:28 AM
only players with bad backhands succed in Båstad, moya, zabaleta, vinciguerra, el aynaoui, poor gaston will probably lose early.

:P

Lee
06-20-2004, 05:15 AM
That's interesting, Lurker!

Action Jackson
06-20-2004, 07:49 AM
only players with bad backhands succed in Båstad, moya, zabaleta, vinciguerra, el aynaoui, poor gaston will probably lose early.

:P

There has to be a change Lurker, I mean Meligieni won Båstad once, then again he didn't have a great backhand, it must the wind that helps the forehands.

RogiFan88
06-24-2004, 09:57 PM
no news on Gaston George?? when will he be at Bastad?? is he playing Kitz also? then he must come to TO [voy a esperarle alli!!]

reiko
06-24-2004, 11:16 PM
An article (in Spanish) with some photos:
http://www0.caras.uol.com.ar/edicion_1171/nota_01.htm

"AQUI EN BUENOS AIRES RECIEN ME SENTI CAMPEON"
De regreso a la Argentina , Gastón Gaudio celebró con su novia y sus afectos
------------------------------------------------------------------

Fue una semana distinta, sin dudas la más trascendente de su vida junto a las dos que le precedieron. Ni bien se consagró ganador del Abierto de Francia, a Gastón Gaudio (25) se le abrieron las puertas de la gloria y el reconocimiento unánime. Después de festejar el domingo por la noche en París con su íntimo amigo Martín Cetra y el preparador físico Fernando “La Pantera” Aguirre, el tenista comprobó en su primera caminata por la Ciudad Luz, el lunes por la mañana, que ganar Roland Garros es un pasaporte directo a la notoriedad. “Fui a comprar una remera y la gente me reconoció”, señaló el nuevo top ten del tenis argentino, quien ese mismo día se embarcó a Buenos Aires para reencontrarse con los afectos que tanto extrañó.
“Fueron dos semanas increíbles. Es que recién estoy empezando a creer ¡qué gané el Abierto de Francia, que repetí el triunfo de nuestra alma mater, Guillermo Vilas!. Por un año la bandera argentina flameará en el estadio más famoso del mundo”, reconoció “El Gato” apenas regresó a su país. Una tierra que añoraba tanto como las calles de Temperley, su barrio. “¿Saben cuándo disfruté más el título? Cuando estuve acá en Temperley, cuando me reencontré con mi novia y con mi familia. Aquí me sentí el verdadero campeón”.
Ansioso por celebrar con los suyos, Gaudio organizó una íntima fiesta el martes por la noche en el bar Tequila. Nadie podía faltar a la convocatoria de “Gasti” en la Costanera, y cada uno de los invitados tenía su porqué. Empezando por sus padres, Marisa y Norberto, sus hermanos, Diego (30) y Julieta (28), y su novia, la modelo Natalia Forchino (28). Y siguiendo por sus amigos del alma, su coach Franco Davín, su ex entrenador Gabriel Mena, sus colegas Mariano Zabaleta y Juan Ignacio Chela y el futbolista Sebastián Rambert, con quien cosechó una cálida amistad a partir de su fanatismo por Independiente.
La velada se extendió hasta las cuatro de la madrugada, los invitados brindaron con Chandon y en los momentos de mayor euforia hubo algunos cánticos alusivos a Guillermo Coria (22). El miércoles, Gastón se reunió con la prensa en el Hotel Emperador y de yapa, cumplió el sueño de encontrarse con Ricardo Bochini, su ídolo futbolero. “No hay precio por ésto. Como él no hay nadie, no existe comparación. Es increíble que me haya venido a visitar”, confesó el tenista, más feliz que nunca por recibir una remera autografiada de manos del “Bocha”.
Poco propenso a mostrarse con su novia, Gaudio debió enfrentar algunos rumores de desgaste en su relación con Forchino. Lo cierto es que la modelo no lo acompañó el jueves en sus dos apariciones televisivas, una en el programa de Susana Giménez y la otra en “CQC”. Tampoco se lo vio con Natalia el sábado, cuando fue al Club Lomas a saludar a sus ex compañeros de rugby. Aprovechando que la primera enfrentaba al CASI, Gaudio –que de chico jugó como apertura- llegó temprano al predio de Longchamps, almorzó con amigos, vio el partido y se llevó como recuerdo la camiseta del club. Por la noche volvió a frecuentar Tequila, y Natalia no apareció.
El fin de semana, Gastón confirmó que no jugará Wimbledon. Además de una lesión, no le faltan ganas de seguir en Buenos Aires. Y de disfrutar al máximo ese dulce sabor que el destino le reserva a quienes nunca dejan de soñar.

Por Carlos Cervetto - Fotos: M.A.De Leon/Perfil

Action Jackson
06-25-2004, 12:37 AM
no news on Gaston George?? when will he be at Bastad?? is he playing Kitz also? then he must come to TO [voy a esperarle alli!!]

He was training with Juan Monaco and I am not sure when he is going, he might be there Thursday or something like that.

He is playing Kitzbhuel and Amersfoort, plus the Olympics and if he is not injured he will be in Toronto.

joes
06-25-2004, 08:47 PM
He is playing Kitzbhuel and Amersfoort, plus the Olympics and if he is not injured he will be in Toronto.

George, are you sure about Amersfoort? He's not on the players' list on the tournaments website.... but it'd be awesome if he came to Holland!!!

Reiko, thanks for the article!

reiko
06-27-2004, 04:45 AM
Hi, joes! :wavey:

To our deepest sorrow :sad: , Gaston is playing Stuttgart this year instead of Amersfoort:
http://www.mercedescup.de/english/index2.htm

joes
06-27-2004, 07:45 AM
Ahhh.... :awww: thanks anyway reiko! Thought it sounded too good to be true.... But what a field in Stuttgart! With Nadal and all!! If it weren't so far away.....

Action Jackson
06-27-2004, 07:46 AM
Ahhh.... :awww: thanks anyway reiko! Thought it sounded too good to be true.... But what a field in Stuttgart! With Nadal and all!! If it weren't so far away.....

Stuttgart is not as good as Båstad actually.

Sjengster
06-27-2004, 06:59 PM
I don't think it's an insult to Coria at all, he's just agreeing that the killer instinct and concentrating on victory is vital when your opponent is injured (not that Gaudio displayed any of that during the final set up until the last few games, whatever he said on TV).

Action Jackson
06-28-2004, 06:08 AM
WUD ON EARTH. fine i guess you can tell people about what gaudio said. but that last comment you made. couldn't you keep that to yourself?!? i'm a die-hard coria fan, and i can tell you that all of us were so devastated that he lost what he had always dreamt of winning. we haven't said anything bad about gaudio, so why are you rubbing it in that gaudio won?!?

Ok, some things need to be cleared up here and now. If you such a die-hard Coria fan what are you doing here in then? Of course, this is a public forum and all constructive opinions which lead to debate are welcome, irrespective of whether posters agree or not.

Then again, this must be a troll because a die-hard fan of Coria wouldn't be coming here, and whining about a particular comment that I have made, and at the same time Coria does not care too much about Gaudio, so really there isn't a point to what you are saying and Coria would do the same thing in the same situation.

Two, I don't go into Coria forums and rubbish the fact, that he cramped and that was his fault and no one elses and unlike Coria who has got over the loss and pushing forwards, some of the fans need to take lessons from him.

Jadestone
06-28-2004, 11:58 AM
Oh sure, so now just because I've posted in Gaudio's forum you're insulting me. I have moved on from that defeat at the RG, but all the same I was talking to other fans and we all didn't know why Gaudio would say that. So that's why I came here, hoping to find an answer. Yeah I found out why he said that, but I didn't need you telling me off for showing what I thought of your post. You said that it's a public forum and people should post what they want but you also said that I shouldn't be post about your comment. You know, you're just a walking contradiction.

Jadestone
06-28-2004, 12:14 PM
Sorry. I've thought it over now that I'm calmer. I didn't mean to insult anyone with either of my comments, I just couldn't contain myself. I'll try to forget that any of this happened. I still don't like some of the things you've said but I'll just try and forget about it and keep to myself. If there was a way of deleting my posts, I'd do so cause I didn't mean to say what I did. I'm sorry, and I hope you don't mind too much about this...

Zetlandsk
06-29-2004, 10:46 AM
only players with bad backhands succed in Båstad, moya, zabaleta, vinciguerra, el aynaoui, poor gaston will probably lose early.

:P

Come to think of it you are right, but maybe this might chance this year.

Zetlandsk
06-29-2004, 10:55 AM
Sorry. I've thought it over now that I'm calmer. I didn't mean to insult anyone with either of my comments, I just couldn't contain myself. I'll try to forget that any of this happened. I still don't like some of the things you've said but I'll just try and forget about it and keep to myself. If there was a way of deleting my posts, I'd do so cause I didn't mean to say what I did. I'm sorry, and I hope you don't mind too much about this...

It's very easy to delete a message, go to edit on your own message and at the top of the message it has a circle, that says delete message then click on it, and it will be deleted.

Actually I agree with what Sjengster and GWH said earlier about the statement. One, when the players are on the court, they will do whatever it takes to win within the rules (though some of the rules need to be fixed), and it doesn't matter whether the opponent is injured or not ( considering cramp is not an injury), the particular player has to be prepared to play as long as it takes to win.

Zetlandsk
06-29-2004, 11:30 AM
Gaston Gaudio showed the courage of a true champion- Henman made the mistake of rallying more from the baseline vs Coria
Serve & Volley
Naresh Kumar

A French newspaper called the red clay at Roland Garros the ‘surface of truth’. The late Lance Tuigay, the doyen of tennis scribes, referred to its testing qualities as “the slow, searching fires”. Indeed, it is a brutally slow surface with no place to hide your weakness. As in the past, honour cannot be salvaged with a single shot at ten paces in the morning mist at the Bois. The route to the title is tortuous and long.

It was a fascinating fortnight full of suspense and high drama. As many as eight matches were won by competitors who were match-point down. Fairytales, shattered dreams, comedy were entwined in the unpredictable twists and turns of fate. The unlikely champion was unseeded Argentine Gaston Gaudio, 25 years of age and ranked 44th in the world. Earlier in the year, he had considered giving up the game!

The unseeded Gaston Gaudio was an unlikely champion
Down two match-points in the final against Coria, when the title was slipping through his fingers, Gaudio stood his ground, planted his solid legs firmly on the clay and went for his shots with the courage of a true champion.

For Coria, just one point short of glory, it was a traumatic tragedy. Can you imagine winning 48 out of 50 matches on clay and losing the most important one after holding two match-points! Seven best-of-five set matches on the red clay found Coria just a fraction short physically. Leading two sets to love against Gaudio, Coria was comfortably sailing through the final when Gaudio, egged on by the crowd clamouring for a good contest, managed to win the third set.

At one game all in the fourth set, Coria was immobilised by cramps in both legs. After medical attention, he made no effort in the fourth set waiting for the cream rubbed on his legs to have effect. Alas, Coria’s spirited and brave comeback in the fifth failed by a whisker.

To read the rest of the French Open review.

http://www.telegraphindia.com/1040614/asp/sports/story_3368238.asp

Zetlandsk
07-08-2004, 12:41 PM
From the champiosnhip website and GWH post.

Världsmästaren imponerade

Gaston Gaudio imponerade när han enkelt besegrade Nikolay Davydenko med 6-3, 6-1.

För första gången sedan 1982 har Synsam Swedish Open äran att ha årets Franska Öppna mästare på plats. Gaudio triumferade i Paris för precis en månad sedan. Därefter har den 25-årige argentinaren inte spelat några tävlingar men dagens match visade att formen fortfarande är god.

- Det var en märklig känsla att spela min första match sedan vinsten i Paris. Det har varit mycket festande hemma i Buenos Aires och jag har varit trött senaste tiden, berättade Gaudio för publiken på centercourten direkt efter matchen.

Gaudio spelar även dubbel i par med Juan Ignacio Chela under eftermiddagen, där de ställs mot Robin Söderling och Jarkko Nieminen.

English
World Champion Impressive

Gaston Gaudio impressed when he easily defeated Nikolay Davydenko 6-3, 6-1.
For the first time since 1982 the Swedish Open has had the honour of the French Open champion playing in Båstad. Gaudio triumphed in Paris exactly a month ago. Afterwards the 25 year old Argentine has not played a tournament since, but todays match showed that he was in good form.

"It was a remarkable feeling to play my first match since the win in Paris. There has been plenty of partying at home in Buenos Aires and lately I have been tired in this time" said Gaudio to the crowd on centre court directly after the match.
Gaudio will play doubles together with Juan Ignacio Chela in the afternoon, there they will meet Robin Söderling och Jarkko Nieminen.

Action Jackson
07-08-2004, 05:25 PM
This was an article in the SydSvenska Dagbladet. The translation isn't great, then again it's better than the standard of Norwegian tennis.

http://www.svd.se/dynamiskt/sport/did_7782166.asp

Gaudio har längtat till Båstad

Båstad Först vann han Öppna franska. Sen nobbade han Wimbledon. Nu är han i Båstad. - Jag har längtat efter att komma hit, säger Gaston Gaudio vars liv förändrades genom skrällsegern i Paris.
SvD fick i går en exklusiv intervju med den 25-årige argentinaren som haft en hektisk tid sedan han för knappt en månad sedan triumferade på Roland Garros.

- Det blev en enorm uppståndelse hemma i Argentina och massor av människor mötte mig på flygplatsen. Sen gav jag intervjuer och åkte runt på olika grejer i en vecka. Det var så tufft att jag tänkte, nä, nu sticker jag härifrån.
Till slut ebbade hyllningarna ändå ut för Argentinas första Grand Slam-segrare på 25 år men hans tillvaro blir aldrig mer vad den varit.
- Jag är så lycklig. Även om jag inte vinner någon mer Grand Slam kommer jag att vara nöjd med min karriär, säger sydamerikanen som inte lagt sig till med de divalater eller primadonnefasoner som alltför ofta följer med stora genombrott.

- Jag ser inte mig själv som en stor stjärna.

Ett bevis på att han verkligen menar det är att han spelar Swedish Open som är en av de mindre turneringarna på ATP-touren. Gaudio kunde förklarat att han inte var kvitt den fotskada som fick honom att stå över Wimbledon för att få mer tid att förbereda sig inför de större turneringar som väntar.
- Men jag ville verkligen till Båstad. Det är sex år sedan jag var här senast och alla spelare snackar om hur bra allt blivit.
Hur förändrade Paris-segern dig som spelare?
- Jag känner mig mycket mer avslappnad nu eftersom mitt självförtroende är större. Förut kunde jag bli spänd och nervös men så känner jag det inte alls nu.
Andra förändringar?
- Alla vill besegra mig.

Även ekonomiskt betydde Grand Slam-segern mycket. Men Gaudio säger att han inte tänker på att sponsorskontrakten är lukrativare och att arrangörer som tidigare inte tog notis om han var på plats eller inte numera lockar med tjocka dollarbuntar.

- Visst har allt det där förändrats men det är ändå inte så viktigt för mig. Jag menar det verkligen. Ända sedan
jag var liten har jag drömt om att vinna i Paris och så fick jag göra det. Den äran och lyckan kan inte mätas i pengar.
Den argentinske grusspecialisten säger att hans målsättningar inte förändrats efter Paris-segern.
- Jag är inte speciellt ambitiös utan det viktigaste för mig är att trivas med livet, säger sydamerikanen som från att ha varit en i mängden av starka grusspelare nu är Swedish Opens största utländska affischnamn jämte Carlos Moya.
- Startfältet här är verkligen starkt och det kommer att bli tufft.

English :

Gaudio longs for Båstad

First he won the French Open, and then later he turned down Wimbledon. Now, he is in Båstad. "I have longed to come here," said Gaston Gaudio, whose life has changed through his surprise victory in Paris.

SvD has an exclusive interview with the 25 year old Argentine, who has had a hectic time since triumphing in Roland Garros, slightly less than a month ago.

"It caused a great stir in Argentina and plenty of people met me at the airport. Later, I gave interviews and went around doing different things in one week. It was tough, that I thought, no, I better leave now."

Yet at the end, the congratulations for Argentina's first Grand Slam champion for 25 years, but his existence won't be like before. I am so fortunate even if I don't win another Grand Slam I can be satisfied with my career, said the South American, who will not show diva behaviour or go through primadonna phases that happen all too often following a big breakthrough.

"I don't see myself as a superstar"

As a testimony that he really means it, is that he is playing the Swedish Open, which is one of the smaller tournaments on the ATP tour. Gaudio could have explained that he wasn't over the foot problem that caused him to miss Wimbledon, and take more time to improve before the bigger tournaments that are waiting.

But I really wanted to come to Båstad. It was six years ago, since I was here last and all the players are talking about how good it has become.

How has the Paris champion changed as a player?

I am much more relaxed and now my self-belief is greater. Before I could become tight and nervous, but now I feel like that at all now.

Other changes?
Everyone will want to beat me.

Also a Grand Slam winner it means economic changes. But Gaudio says he is not thinking about the lucrative sponsorships and the earlier arrangements in place and takes no notice of the numbers or the large amount of dollars.

"Certainly, there has been some changes, yet it is not so important for me. I really mean that. Yet, since I was little I have dreamed about winning Paris and I have done it. The honour and happiness can't be measured in money."

The Argentinian claycourt specialist said his goals haven't changed since the Paris win. "I am not especially ambitious, and the most important for me, is that I am happy in life, " said the South American who has been among the mulititude of strong claycourt players and now is the Swedish Open's biggest foreign attraction besides Carlos Moya.

The starting field is strong and it will be tough.

PerezRoldan
07-08-2004, 06:40 PM
Thanks for the article GWH.

faraway
07-09-2004, 08:24 AM
Gaston is mature, calm and humorous. I'd like to see that. This makes me like him more.
And thanks for George's translation.

Action Jackson
07-09-2004, 05:33 PM
Gaston is mature, calm and humorous. I'd like to see that. This makes me like him more.
And thanks for George's translation.

No problem for that, he is a natural guy who knows his strengths and weaknesses and I love the bit how hw won't take the appearance money to play at these events.

faraway
07-10-2004, 07:44 AM
No problem for that, he is a natural guy who knows his strengths and weaknesses and I love the bit how hw won't take the appearance money to play at these events.
yeah, you catch the point —— natural. I like the word. Everytime I saw him I just saw him. I saw him win. I saw him lost. I saw him kind. I saw him rough. I saw him cry. I saw him laugh. Everything comes from a natural guy. But what I love him most and wish most is as what he said:
"I am not especially ambitious, and the most important for me, is that I am happy in life."
That's all.

Zetlandsk
07-12-2004, 12:51 PM
Gaudio faces Zabaleta in all-Argentine final
(Adds quotes)

BASTAD, Sweden, July 11 (Reuters) - French Open champion Gaston Gaudio gave Swedish teenager Robin Soderling a claycourt lesson on Sunday, winning 6-4 6-2 to reach the Swedish Open final.

Argentine Gaudio will face compatriot and defending champion Mariano Zabaleta, who continued his good run at the tournament with a convincing 6-1 6-4 win over Chilean sixth seed Fernando Gonzalez.

The final will be on Monday because of rain delays. Play was washed out on Saturday and the start of the semi-finals was delayed on Sunday.

The weather worked to Gaudio's advantage as it slowed down the court considerably.
Soderling, who is not a natural claycourt player, lost his patience in the second set and made too many mistakes to threaten the Argentine.

"It was easier than I had expected," said Gaudio. "I thought it was going to be a harder match, considering how well Soderling has been playing.

"I feel that I have the same confidence as during the French Open, but I was probably playing better there" the Argentine said.

"Since then almost a month passed without me touching a racket, so it was a bit slow at the beginning of this week."

Gaudio broke the Swedish wildcard in the seventh game of the first set and then held on to serve to clinch it.

The 25-year-old from Buenos Aires grabbed a double break in the next set for a 4-0 lead and held serve to clinch the match.

His opponent in the final, Zabaleta, should hold no surprises for Gaudio as the pair grew up together.

"We've known each other since we were eight or nine years old," said Gaudio. "Zabaleta comes from a smaller town and used to stay with my family when he trained in Buenos Aires."

"We often played each other as juniors and it's always tough to face a friend."

RogiFan88
07-12-2004, 02:54 PM
Para los que hablan espanol:

LUNES 12 de julio de 2004 08:40
Duelo argentino en Suecia
Zabaleta volvió a quedarse con el torneo de Bastad
Venció a Gastón Gaudio por 6-1, 4-6 y 7-6 y retuvo el título del abierto sueco por segundo año consecutivo

Mariano Zabaleta retuvo el título en el torneo de Bastad, que reparte premios por 375.750 euros (466.000 dólares), al imponerse por 6-1, 4-6 y 7-6 (7-4) a Gastón Gaudio.
.
El tandilense ganó fácilmente el primer set, mientras que en el segundo reaccionó Gaudio, quien no jugaba desde que había ganado en Roland Garros.
.
En el tercer set no se dieron ventajas y arribaron así a una definición por tie break, en el que triunfó Zabaleta por 7-4.
.
La lluvia del sábado obligó a aplazar para ayer las semifinales, lo que provocó que la final se postergase para hoy.
.
Esta fue la segunda final entre argentinos en esta temporada y la decimo novena en el circuito profesional.
.
El tandilense, cabeza de serie número 8, le había ganado ayer en semifinales al chileno Fernando González por 6-1 y 6-4.
.
Con este triunfo de Zabaleta, el historial quedó igualado 2 a 2. El campeón de Roland Garros se impuso en Bucarest en 1999 y en Buenos Aires en 2001, mientras que el Negro había triunfado en la primera rueda del Masters Series de Hamburgo en 2000.
.
Esta final entre dos argentinos cosechó otro logro para la Legión: se sumó a la rica historia del tenis argentino el título número 154.
.
Sin descanso: ahora, Stuttgart
.
Gastón Gaudio y Mariano Zabaleta no tendrán descanso. Deberán viajar a Alemania para intervenir en el certamen de Stuttgart (750.000 dólares). Gaudio es el máximo favorito por la ausencia por lesión de Guillermo Coria, defensor del título.
.
Hoy debutarán Guillermo Cañas , ante el belga Norman Dick, Juan Pablo Guzmán, frente al checo Radek Stepanek y Franco Squillari , con el español Nicolás Almagro. El torneo también cuenta con Juan Ignacio Chela.
.
José Acasuso comenzará hoy su participación en el torneo de Amersfoort, en Holanda (375.750 euros), donde se medirá con el chileno Fernando González.
.
Fuente: atptennis.com
http://www.lanacion.com.ar/

LUNES 12 de julio de 2004
Tenis / El torneo de Bastad
Todo quedará entre amigos
Gastón Gaudio y Mariano Zabaleta mantienen una gran amistad desde que tenían ocho años y hoy definirán el certamen en Suecia; el campeón de Roland Garros dejó en el camino en las semifinales al local Robin Soderling, mientras que el tandilense venció al chileno Fernando González

BASTAD, Suecia.- Una de los primeras llamadas que recibió Gastón Gaudio tras la conquista de Roland Garros fue la de Mariano Zabaleta. Para el Rey de París, significó el saludo del amigo y compañero de generación (ambos nacieron en 1978) con el que compartió tantos viajes y sueños durante la época de juveniles. Ahora, ambos estarán frente a frente en una final de ATP. El destino los pondrá cara a cara hoy, en el partido decisivo del torneo de Bastad (375.750 euros en premios y puntos para el circuito), que le dará a la rica historia del tenis argentino el título número 154.
.
Gaudio tuvo un comienzo algo dubitativo, pero luego superó sin problemas al juvenil local Robin Soderling (19 años), por 6-4 y 6-2, en tanto que Zabaleta, ganador de este certamen el año último, se deshizo, también sin resignar un parcial, del chileno Fernando González, por 6-1 y 6-4. Será la segunda ocasión en que la final de Bastad se juegue un lunes. El único antecedente es de 1981, cuando el francés Thierry Tulasne derrotó al sueco Anders Jarryd.
.
"Creo que jugué mi mejor partido en esta semana. Me sentí realmente bien en la cancha y mi confianza está en alza. Estoy jugando casi al nivel que tuve en París, y eso que hay que recordar que antes de empezar en este torneo estuve un mes sin jugar", señaló Gaudio, que lleva acumulados 13 triunfos consecutivos.
.
Zabaleta también se mostró muy conforme con su actualidad. "Jugué muy bien, muy sólido. Estoy feliz de haber llegado a esta final aunque sea un lunes. Será algo distinto", expresó el tandilense, que ofreció en la victoria ante González un excelente nivel en el servicio.
.
Ambos se refirieron a lo extraño que será enfrentarse sabiendo que uno se quedará con el premio mayor y el otro con las manos vacías. "Jugar con Gastón es bueno y malo. Bueno, porque es mi mejor amigo y malo también por el mismo motivo, por lo que se dificulta enfrentarlo. Nos conocemos desde que teníamos 8 años. Cuando éramos chicos y yo viajaba a Buenos Aires solía quedarme a dormir en su casa, porque además jugábamos en el mismo club. Sí me pone contento saber que ambos pudimos llegar a una final de ATP", admitió Zabaleta, que llegó a la segunda final de la temporada tras haber caído en el Masters Series de Roma.
.
Gaudio también hizo memoria y habló sobre la amistad que lo une con el tandilense, y hasta se permitió una broma. "Espero que Zabaleta me permita ganar, porque él ya ganó este título el año pasado (al ecuatoriano Nicolás Lapentti). Hablando en serio, creo que va a ser un partido muy difícil porque nos conocemos muy bien, a pesar de que en el circuito no nos hemos enfrentado muchas veces", explicó Gaudio, que se impuso en dos de las tres ocasiones que se midieron en un torneo de ATP: en Bucarest 1999 y en Buenos Aires 2001. Zabaleta, 44° en la Carrera de Campeones, lo doblegó en el certamen de Hamburgo, en 2000.
.
Después del éxito en Roland Garros, Gaudio busca seguir la exitosa senda en el circuito. Para Zabaleta significa la posibilidad de volver a gritar campeón en una ciudad que le sienta bien. Pero en el medio de las especulaciones de ambos está la singular relación que los une. Se tratará de una final que quedará entre amigos. Una definición en la que, gane quien gane, los dos se retirarán con una ancha sonrisa.
.
www.atptennis.com
.
154
Serán, con el de hoy, en Bastad, los títulos cosechados por tenistas de nuestro país en torneos de la ATP. Gaudio lleva tres, mientras que Zabaleta ganó dos
.
Sin descanso: ahora, Stuttgart
.
Gastón Gaudio y Mariano Zabaleta no tendrán descanso. No bien terminen la final de Bastad deberán viajar a Alemania para intervenir en el certamen de Stuttgart (750.000 dólares). Gaudio es el máximo favorito por la ausencia por lesión de Guillermo Coria, defensor del título. Hoy debutarán Guillermo Cañas, ante el belga Norman Dick, Juan Pablo Guzmán, frente al checo Radek Stepanek y Franco Squillari, con el español Nicolás Almagro. El torneo también cuenta con Juan Ignacio Chela.
.
José Acasuso comenzará hoy su participación en el torneo de Amersfoort, en Holanda (375.750 euros), donde se medirá con el chileno Fernando González.

http://www.lanacion.com.ar/04/07/12/dd_617737.asp
LA NACION | 12.07.2004 | Página 16 | Deportes

Action Jackson
07-12-2004, 07:28 PM
I can place it here since it's about his best friend and their matches.

www.swedishopen.org

Tiebreak Finals

Two thrilling finals were played on Monday. Both the singles and doubles finals were completed after a tiebreak in the final set.

Mariano Zabaleta defended his singles title and the new doubles champions are Jonas Björkman and Mahesh Bhupathi.

On Center Court, the first ever all-Argentinean final of Synsam Swedish Open was played. The French Open champion Gaston Gaudio faced his best friend Mariano Zabaleta. Zabaleta dominated from the start and won the first set against a slightly indolent Gaudio. In the second set, the match turned around. Gaudio, who came back after being down 0-2 in the French Open final, started to find his game and managed to take the match to a third set. Right there, the battle was intensive between two players who know each other very well. Zabaleta was always slightly ahead and got a break of serve both to 3-1 and 4-2. Gaudio got out of trouble and also saved a match point while serving at 5-6. The match was taken to a deciding tie break where Zabaleta grabbed the victory after 7-4.

- I am very happy. I beat a great player today. I was focused and concentrated in the final moments of the match and that gave me the win, Zabaleta says.

- I played really well this week. I love this tournament. I really like the people and feel good here and will definitely be back next year, the champion continued.

Zabaleta has now won three career titles and two in Båstad.

- It feels even better to win this year. Now, I can play some jokes with Gaston, Zabaleta said with a laugh.

Action Jackson
07-12-2004, 07:30 PM
www.guardian.co.uk/sport

Zabaleta overcomes Gaudio to win Swedish Open
(Adds quotes, detail)
BASTAD, Sweden, July 12 (Reuters) - Argentine Mariano Zabaleta retained the Swedish Open title with a 6-1 4-6 7-6 victory over his compatriot and friend Gaston Gaudio in the rain-delayed final on Monday.

Second seed Gaudio won the French Open last month but Zabaleta showed he was the master on the Swedish clay as he bagged his third career title.

"This is my favourite tournament," said Zabaleta, who ended a five-year title drought last year when he won the event. "I promise to come back next year.

"I beat a great player today...I was focused and concentrated and played very well in the third set tiebreak.

"It feels even better to win this year. Now, I can play some jokes with Gaston.
"Last time we played was a long time ago but I know his game very well," added Zabaleta, who practised with Gaudio in Buenos Aires in his teens.

Zabaleta clinched the first set in just 29 minutes after Gaudio failed to hold serve once.Gaudio found his rhythm in the second and broke Zabaleta for a 5-4 lead before levelling the contest.

Zabaleta regained the momentum at the start of the deciding set to race into a 4-2 lead. But nerves crept into his game as he tried to close out the match. Zabaleta allowed the world number 11 to claw his way back into the match and also wasted a match point on Gaudio's serve in the 12th game.

With Gaudio forcing the match into a tiebreak, Zabaleta lobbed his opponent on match point to seal it 7-4.

"Congratulations Mariano, you are a worthy winner," said Gaudio.
"This has been a great week. Like I said yesterday, the weather was the only enemy here. Everything else was unbelievable and I will be back next year."

Zetlandsk
07-16-2004, 03:38 AM
French Open Champion Gaudio in Round of Sixteen after Hard-Fought Match

He wobbled - but did not fall: French Open champion Gaston Gaudio and No.2 seed at MercedesCup reached the round of sixteen at MercedesCup after a very hard match in the second round which was broken off on Wednesday evening with a score of 3:6, 6:2 from the Argentinean's point of view. On Thursday morning, the American qualifier Hugo Armando dominated at first by taking Gaudio's service at an early stage and continuing to lead until 5:4.

Then the No.11 in the world rankings countered and saved himself in the tie-break with the fourth matchpoint for a 7:5 win in a match that had lasted 2 hours and 19 minutes altogether. At almost the same time, the 2002 French Open winner, Albert Costa (ESP) decided his match against Mariano Zabaleta on the Grandstand court in his favor. The Argentinean, who won the tournament last week in Bastad, Sweden, played a well-balanced match against Costa and was only narrowly defeated 5:7, 6:7(4).

After the match, Costa was full of praise for his opponent, "He won the tournament last week and so I had expected him to play a strong game and have a lot of confidence. It was very difficult to beat him."

Action Jackson
07-16-2004, 04:09 AM
Early in the evening, the Argentinean had to play his round of sixteen match against Tomas Berdych (CZE). And this time Gaudio quite clearly had a lot less trouble in deciding the match in his favor. After a good hour, he won his place in the quarter-finals 6:2, 6:4.

Zetlandsk
07-18-2004, 09:16 AM
Gaudio Wrestles with Ferrer - French Open Champion in Final of MercedesCup after Hard Battle

The No. 7 of the champions race had to work very hard. French Open champion Gaston Gaudio needed two hours, 23 minutes and a total of seven matchballs in the semi-final of the MercedesCup on Saturday afternoon to defeat the Spaniard David Ferrer 6:3, 5:7, 6:4 and to get into the final. In the final, the Argentinean will now be playing against his fellow-countryman Guillermo Canas at 1 p.m. on Sunday, who he last beat in the first round at Roland Garros.

At first, Gaudio clearly dominated the semi-final and won the first set after only 39 minutes. In the second set as well, the Argentinean put on the pressure and was already leading 5:2, when at a score of 5:3 and 40:15 and his own serve he twice had the opportunity to decide the match in his own favor.

But suddenly his Spanish opponent showed his fighting qualities and won five games one after the other. At 7:5, the 22-year-old Ferrer took the second set, but then seem to go down in the decisive set. At a score of 5:1, the three years older Gaudio had some more matchballs. But Ferrer came back into the match again, managed the break and won the next two games. But the clear favorite finally managed to win the seventh matchball for a final score of 6:4.

This means that Gaston Gaudio is in the final of the MercedesCup for the second time since the year 2000. "I was almost through after two sets, but he played outstandingly well during the important points and came back in the second set," commented Gaudio about the match afterwards. "Then I was 5:1 ahead in the third match and thought, actually it is all over now.

But at 5:4, I was getting a little nervous because I thought the same thing was going to happen again." The Argentinean is really looking forward to the final match at MercedesCup. "It is really good to be able to be in the final twice in succession," said the Bastad finalist from last weekend, who also was in the final at Stuttgart Weissenhof in the year 2000.

According to Gaudio it is always a little different to play against a fellow-countryman. "There is so much emotion in the game. We are both playing very well at the moment and I hope it will also be a very good final."

Marc Rosset is Tall
07-20-2004, 05:57 AM
From the ATP site.

Unseeded Guillermo Canas wins his fourth career title by defeating No. 2 seed Gaston Gaudio 5-7, 6-2, 6-0, 1-6, 6-3 in three hours and 40 minutes in the final of the MercedesCup.

In the final Gaudio quickly took a 4-0 lead in the first set, which included seven breaks of serve, before Canas got into the match and managed to get back to 5-5 only to lose his serve again and the set 7-5. Canas rebounded straight away and won the second and third sets convincingly 6-2 and 6-0, including a streak of nine games in a row. In the fourth set Gaudio turned the match yet again winning the set 6-1. He also took a 2-0 lead in the fifth set but Canas somehow found new energy to win five straight games, including two breaks of serve. At 5-3 the 26-year-old served out the match and sealed victory on his first match point.

Having lost in the final of the MercedesCup in 2001 (l. to Gustavo Kuerten) and in 2002 (l. to Mikhail Youzhny) Canas makes it third time lucky in Stuttgart. He picks up a brand new silver Mercedes-Benz SLK 200 Kompressor in addition to 50 INDESIT ATP 2004 Race points and €104,500.

Canas defeated Dick Norman, No. 9 seed Florian Mayer, Stefan Koubek, Radek Stepanek, No. 15 seed Nikolay Davydenko and No. 2 seed Gaston Gaudio en-route to the MercedesCup title.

Gaudio was looking for his fourth ATP title in his ninth career final. He was appearing in his third straight all-Argentine final, having won the Roland Garros title crown (d. Guillermo Coria) and lost to Mariano Zabaleta in last week's tournament in Bastad. The 25-year-old reached the final of the MercedesCup in 2000, where he also lost to a countryman in Franco Squillari.

Gaudio picks up 35 INDESIT ATP 2004 Race Points and €55,000.

Gaudio: “I'm so tired. I couldn't play the way I wanted in the second and third set. I was almost prepared to quit but I tried to fight a little bit more, and I took the fourth set. I was 2-0 up in the fifth but he came back fighting so hard. Finally he took the match playing better than me.”

“I guess it was mental tiredness. I've been playing difficult matches every day. You have to be focused every day, it's really tiring. “

“Reaching the final in this tournament is unbelievable. It's the second time for me in the final and I would have preferred to win the car. I want to come next year and win. If I don't get the car I'm going to steal it!”

lsy
07-21-2004, 07:50 AM
Gaudio:
“Reaching the final in this tournament is unbelievable. It's the second time for me in the final and I would have preferred to win the car. I want to come next year and win. If I don't get the car I'm going to steal it!”

:lol:

Sounds like hard fought matches in this tournament. Hopefully he wins this next one.

Action Jackson
08-15-2004, 08:50 AM
This is the latest Gaston news, this comes from a friend and to the Spanish speakers if they could translate for us.

Taken from Melu, thank you so much.

Gaston is wearing a suit and these are the links to an interview on the set of Caiga Quien Caiga, a popular humoristic show that looks at politics and entretainment with sarcasm and dark humor.

Cable/DSL users:
http://www.cqc.tv/video2004/11gaudio-bb.rm?embed=true

Modem users:
http://www.cqc.tv/video2004/11gaudio.rm?embed=true

tommy_girl
08-16-2004, 02:17 PM
hey.. thanks..really cute! it made my day! :D

rassklovn
08-17-2004, 07:17 AM
This is the translation of the video.

Interviewers (Mario Pergolini and Eduardo De La Puente) = I
Gaston Gaudio = G


I: As it is a tradition in this program, we always invite the
winners of grand slams...If the winners of gs do not come here for
us, this program is useless...
I: Yes, we could not invite Vilas cause we were not on air in the
senventies yet.
I: so you can see that we are not lying.
I: That's why we would like to welcome the RG winner in the classic
that we call...

Interview with the champion

*Gaston appears on air (watch that he hits his head) and is welcomed
by the 3 guys, who startmocking Coria alledging they have cramps.
Then they do the wave*

I: Thanks for being here live.
G: you are welcome, it's an honour. We have been working together
for a long time. (for the ones who are not in Arg, Pergolini used to
call Gaston after every match in RG cause he was his chosen player
to go far in France since everyone else thought Coria would go
further, that's why Gaston named him his manager...all joking of
course)

I: Let's remind all that when we started to work together you were
ranked 43, 80?
G: 44

I: Mario, do you have what? 10% of his prize money?
I: no, we don't have a business thing going on...
G: it's a matter of friendship

I: yes, we've been together since Hamburg
I: nice business he made ...

I: how do you feel? Are you happy, relaxed? How did you find Susana?
(a blonde diva who has a tv show here and that GG went before)
G: fine

I: is she nice?
G: yes, she's like you see her on tv.

I: thanks a lot for being here, we'll make you 5 questions only.
Don't worry cause none regaring your gf or things like that...
G: go ahead

I: you gf was before of after winning...no, it's a joke, haha
I: Can I ask sothing about you gf but in a good way?...I heard
somewhere that she didn't went to your tournaments as cabala. Whose
idea was it? Yours or hers?
G: mine
*The other guys make fun of it and Gaston laughs*
I: that's why he's the champion.

1NightStandsRule
08-21-2004, 01:47 PM
Thanks for the translation and the video was funny seeing Gaston in a suit.

1NightStandsRule
08-22-2004, 08:44 AM
Lets hope that he can win 1 or 2 matches at the US Open.

RogiFan88
08-24-2004, 03:26 AM
OK, I FINALLY saw the video, had to just go to the CQC site itself and get it! I think Gaston looks lovely in a suit... wish I could see some off-court photos of him... any in S Amer mags perchance??

Georgie, if you find any mag articles/photos on El Gato, por favor, let me know!

Just watched most of the RG04 F today... I still love Gaston's emotion... brings a tear or two to my eyes...

The more I see him, the younger he looks... why is that??

He's a cutie [oh oh, don't worry, I won't forsake my sweet Rogi!]...

buenas noches, amigos!

FryslanBoppe
09-21-2004, 07:04 AM
Gaston made an appearance on Mariano Zabaleta's new show on Argentine TV.

This was taken from various Argentine sources and a summary of what he said.

Mariano asked him about his hopes of becoming #1 and Gaston answered : "Honestly speaking? The one thing I can do with Federer & Rodthingy right on top is to play cards".

Another funny moment was when Mariano asked what did he wanted to do in Bs As (being with his family, going out for dinner, spending time with friends, play golf?) and GG looked at him and said: Well, Bolu... you answered everything yourself, what do you want me to say.

Mariano asked him if he played football and Gaston said that among friends once in while they did. Mariano remarked that GG was bad at it...very funny. They showed how they both played fifa video games of course!

RogiFan88
09-21-2004, 02:31 PM
cool that Gaston and Mariano are such good friends! right now they are my fave Argies [my most fave is Vilas, por supuesto!]

aiwen_mei
09-22-2004, 04:38 PM
ThanX a lot, Fryslanboppe

Here is another fan of GG at Melumania's webboard named Valeria sharing about GG's interview. Hope everyone enjoy!

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

GG gave an interview to his childhood friend Mariano Zabaleta, to inaugurate Mariano’s new program on an Argentine TV channel. They were sitting in the gardens of the Buenos Aires Tennis Club, taking a break from training.

For all who couldn’t see the interview, I can tell you that he seems in great form, relaxed, very funny and frank, laughing a lot and completely different to the serious image he gives on court. He delivered two more of his characteristic sayings:
When asked if he hoped to be No. 1, he said “Playing against Federer and Roddick? Well, we could play “truco”(a card game)!”
And asked how he got to the end of RG, he said “After two weeks, with all the stress of competing every day, my brain felt fried”.

He’s mad about soccer football, but he plays only among friends, because of the danger of injuries. So his main sport other than tennis is golf. And he, Zabaleta and friends pass the time with Play-Station football competitions.

He told about how he was informed at the last minute that all his family, girl-friend and friends, about 20 of them, were arriving in Paris for the final. He felt it would be too distracting, especially the logistics of finding them transportation and looking after them, and he had to tell them not to come.

He became serious when asked about the Davis Cup, pointing out that he had won 13 matches in a row, that he’d always accepted when called, and that when he lost two matches in Malaga (against the then No. 1 and No. 6 players) he’d been crucified.

He’s obviously putting pressure on the authorities to be called again, as he says it’s the most important challenge for a player, and that if all of them gave it priority during one year they might have a chance of winning the cup.

I wish you could have seen the interview!

RogiFan88
09-22-2004, 09:05 PM
me too... any chance of them repeating it?? who's on next week?

MeluG
09-23-2004, 09:13 PM
Gaston made an appearance on Mariano Zabaleta's new show on Argentine TV.

This was taken from various Argentine sources and a summary of what he said.

Mariano asked him about his hopes of becoming #1 and Gaston answered : "Honestly speaking? The one thing I can do with Federer & Rodthingy right on top is to play cards".

Another funny moment was when Mariano asked what did he wanted to do in Bs As (being with his family, going out for dinner, spending time with friends, play golf?) and GG looked at him and said: Well, Bolu... you answered everything yourself, what do you want me to say.

Mariano asked him if he played football and Gaston said that among friends once in while they did. Mariano remarked that GG was bad at it...very funny. They showed how they both played fifa video games of course!

Hey...I wrote that. No seeing it here is surreal, lol!!! wth?

MeluG
09-23-2004, 09:14 PM
This is the translation of the video.

Interviewers (Mario Pergolini and Eduardo De La Puente) = I
Gaston Gaudio = G


I: As it is a tradition in this program, we always invite the
winners of grand slams...If the winners of gs do not come here for
us, this program is useless...
I: Yes, we could not invite Vilas cause we were not on air in the
senventies yet.
I: so you can see that we are not lying.
I: That's why we would like to welcome the RG winner in the classic
that we call...

Interview with the champion

*Gaston appears on air (watch that he hits his head) and is welcomed
by the 3 guys, who startmocking Coria alledging they have cramps.
Then they do the wave*

I: Thanks for being here live.
G: you are welcome, it's an honour. We have been working together
for a long time. (for the ones who are not in Arg, Pergolini used to
call Gaston after every match in RG cause he was his chosen player
to go far in France since everyone else thought Coria would go
further, that's why Gaston named him his manager...all joking of
course)

I: Let's remind all that when we started to work together you were
ranked 43, 80?
G: 44

I: Mario, do you have what? 10% of his prize money?
I: no, we don't have a business thing going on...
G: it's a matter of friendship

I: yes, we've been together since Hamburg
I: nice business he made ...

I: how do you feel? Are you happy, relaxed? How did you find Susana?
(a blonde diva who has a tv show here and that GG went before)
G: fine

I: is she nice?
G: yes, she's like you see her on tv.

I: thanks a lot for being here, we'll make you 5 questions only.
Don't worry cause none regaring your gf or things like that...
G: go ahead

I: you gf was before of after winning...no, it's a joke, haha
I: Can I ask sothing about you gf but in a good way?...I heard
somewhere that she didn't went to your tournaments as cabala. Whose
idea was it? Yours or hers?
G: mine
*The other guys make fun of it and Gaston laughs*
I: that's why he's the champion.

And I wrote that too... :rolleyes:

Adri
09-24-2004, 05:05 AM
Mariano has a show? Wow, that is so cool. I wished it aired on Fox Sports, that way I'd be able to catch it... any chance of a website or anything? It would be nice if they posted a video there like they did with the "Caiga Quien Caiga" appearence. ;)

Daniel
09-25-2004, 02:50 AM
Adri , your avatar is nice :yeah:

reiko
09-26-2004, 01:52 PM
French Tennis Magazine (October 2004) has a big interview with Gaston. :)
I am far from fluent in French but most of the questions seems to be about
the Final and then about familiar stuff like the difficult times he has had.
Looks like not much of "news" in there.

But perhaps this is rather new to us:
Q. Pour conlure, on vous sait plutot introverti.
Y a-t-il une activite qui vous permettre de vraiment vous relacher?
A. Le golf. C'est une vraie passion. J'ai un handicap de 13-14.
Sur un parcours, j'oublie tout.

Wonder if "handicap 13-14" means he is good at golf. :confused:

reiko
09-26-2004, 02:15 PM
Also, love Gaston's comment on a photo (Gaston raising the Cup
between Vilas and McEnroe who are clapping Gaston):

"C'est la plus belle photo du monde. Quand je serai vieux,
quand je regarderai cette photo de moi entre Vilas et McEnroe,
je suis sur que j'aurai toujours des frissons."

(It means something like: This is the most beautiful photo in the world.
When I'm old and watch this photo of me between Vilas and McEnroe,
I will always have the shivers. :dance: )


Btw, didn't know that the Roland Garros 2004 Official Book is already out:
http://www.loustal.nl/ACTUEEL.HTM

Adri
10-05-2004, 05:29 AM
Adri , your avatar is nice :yeah:

Hehe, thank you!!! :wavey:

Vale
10-07-2004, 01:57 PM
Is the French Tennis mag on the Web?

Choupi
10-08-2004, 01:09 PM
Is the French Tennis mag on the Web?

Hi Vale,

You can find French Tennis magazine on the web here: http://www.tennismagazine.fr

Click on "le magazine du mois" then on "go". But sorry, you won't be able to read the whole article. You have to be registered for this. I receive the magazine every month at home. Do you want me to send it to you? Maybe I can translate it if somebody's interested but it'll take some time...so tell me.
:wavey:

Vale
10-08-2004, 01:47 PM
Hi Choupi,
Many thanks for the info! I read the short excerpt that appears online, which has no real news but is very nice all the same. thanks a million for offering to send me the mag, but I won't bother you with that! I know translating is hard work, but if you could extract just the parts you like best and post them, that would be great!

Choupi
10-08-2004, 01:59 PM
Hi Choupi,
Many thanks for the info! I read the short excerpt that appears online, which has no real news but is very nice all the same. thanks a million for offering to send me the mag, but I won't bother you with that! I know translating is hard work, but if you could extract just the parts you like best and post them, that would be great!

Well, I'll try to choose my favourite parts but it will be hard. I thought everything GG said was important so...Of course, it's Gaston! :eek:

Just be patient. I'm off for the weekend so you'll have to wait a little bit. But promised, I won't forget you. :kiss:

Remember, Choupi's always there when you need her! ;) ;) ;)

joeb_uk
10-08-2004, 09:20 PM
handicap of 13 or so is about average

ataxie
10-09-2004, 11:26 AM
I translated the first part of the interview from Tennis Magazine , it's on my website about GG if you wanna have a look , it's in the MULTIMEDIA section (then interviews)
http://sites.estvideo.net/gastongaudioweb/

I need time to translate the rest of the interview , it's sooo long lol ! Choupi , si tu veux m'aider lol :worship:

Choupi
10-09-2004, 04:08 PM
I translated the first part of the interview from Tennis Magazine , it's on my website about GG if you wanna have a look , it's in the MULTIMEDIA section (then interviews)
http://sites.estvideo.net/gastongaudioweb/

I need time to translate the rest of the interview , it's sooo long lol ! Choupi , si tu veux m'aider lol :worship:

OK I'm always there when you need help. It took me two hours but it was worth it! :D

So, here's my transcription of the article from Tennis Magasine. I only tape what seemed important to me.
The interview was given by GG to Y. Cochennec, journalist, right at the beginning of the US Open.

TM: How did your country live and welcome your triumph in Roland Garros?
GG: It's been incredible. When I arrived at the airport in BA, there were hundreds of people waiting for me but the only ones I wanted to see were my family and my girlfriend. I hadn't seen them for 2 months.
[...]
I slept for a couple of days because I was dead tired.(smile)

TM: 3 months after your exploit, is it still so difficult for you to believe you've won RG?
GG: It is indeed (smile). But I'm getting used to the idea that I've actually won RG. You must know that I've always dreamt of winning in Paris, since the very first day I touched a racket. I had anticipated the match point so much that living it for real has been sort of an earthquake for me. But now, when I come back home, I can see and touch the trophy. My dream's really become true(smile)

TM: And where is it?
GG: In my bedroom where I've also hanged up a photograph with me kissing it, an incredible moment. I've wanted to keep it as close to me as possible. RG was the dream of my life. At night, when I go to bed and look at the trophy, I can still feel happiness allthrough my body.
[...]

TM: When you watched your final, what struck you most?
GG: The way I saved the 2 match balls. Watching those 2 points, quietly sitting on my sofa, made me almost feel every single emotion running through my body at that time. And I really wonder how I didn't make any fault. I'm not saying it was a matter of life and death, but I think it would've been too tough for me if I hadn't won those 2 points. Yeah, it would have been real tough. No, how I put the ball in spite of all the tension I was feeling, it's a real mystery.
[...]
I was so nervous at the beginning of the match. Even before, in the locker room. J. McEnroe passed by and I asked him if it was normal to be so tense when you play a Grand Slam final. He answered me :"think of those who went to Irak and compare their restlessness to yours." He repeated I was not there to suffer but to make the most of the moment, of this so unique occasion. It comforted me for a few minutes, but when I got onto the court, my anguish came back. And I played the first 2 sets the way I did. It was surely the worst tennis I had shown since the beginning of the tournament.
[...]

TM: In the 3rd set, there's been a very important moment in the final. You won a spectacular point after a very long fight,which created a sort of contact between you and the public. They did the wave. You applaused...
GG: I needed some help(smile). So when they did the wave, I told myself that they were yet having fun with me. I remembered what JM told me. I had to enjoy the moment I was living. I had dreamt to be there. It shouldn't be a nightmare. All I had to do was to play my tennis, take this match as I should do, as a game and not as a pain.
[...]

TM: As you've already said, winning RG was the dream of your life. Could you describe us the very moment, the couple of seconds when delivrance breaks out?
GG: I immediatly felt like sharing my joy with the people, like kissing them. And that's why I ran all around the court, clapping their hands.
[...]

TM: And then, Vilas and McEnroe gave you the trophy...
GG: (loudly) And it made the greatest pic of the world!(smile) When I'm old and watch that pic of me between them, I'm sure I'll feel the same shivers running through my body as I'm feeling today. That's a picture for my kids and no doubt they will be proud of me.

TM: Though you're a good player on clay, it was hard to picture you in winning RG. What were your ambitions when you arrived in Paris?
GG: I'd had a real awful beginning in the season. I was not playing good tennis, though Franco and me had made a very big preparation in San Juan at the end of 2003.
[...]
In Barcelona, I turned the corner when I beat Moya and when I played and lost the final against Robredo in 5 sets.
[...]
(In RG) I mean I was fearing the draw. I told Franco : I want to play somebody I don't know personally in the first round. Because I'm a sensible guy and I've enough to do with my own emotions as a player, so I don't need to add more!(smile) And I fell on Canas, another Argentinean. This match may have been the key to everything. I won it in 5 sets, but I could also have lost it the same way.
[...]

TM: From which moment did you tell yourself, I can win RG?
GG: When I beat Hewitt in quarterfinal.
[...]
In the semis, we were only 4 left and none of us had ever won a Grand Slam before. So I told myself I was equal to the others.
[...]

TM: You had never reached a gdslam quarterfinal. You were dreaming to win a gs but did you think it could happen?
GG: No, absolutely not. As I've already said before, I've always lacked self confidence and I didn't think I could achieve such an exploit.
[...]
I was even a bit negative as I was longing for the tournament to end. I was so much tired. Relaxing had simply become impossible, even the days I wasn't playing. My legs were aching because I was tired but my head ached too because I just couldn't stop thinking.
[...]

TM: Do you feel like going back to RG in november when you come back in Paris Berçy?
GG: I didn't think to do so but I'd like to check if my name's written on top of court n°1(smile). So why not? I really would like to say how much I love this place and this tournament. For me, it's the greatest one of all and winning it is so incredible.
[...]

TM: Did you have, in your career, a moment more difficult than the others, a moment when the pain you told us about before was simply unbearable?
GG: I did and it's not very far(smile). It was last year. It started with the DC semifinal Argentine played against Spain in september. I played an awful match against Moya. I just didn't feel like fighting on the court. In Davis Cup!
It was awful. The media brought me down in Argentina. I just couldn't play in the following months. Tennis was not my interest any longer and I went on traveling though all I wanted was to be at home. It all lasted for 3 months. [...] I didn't care about loosing. Only my body was on the court but my mind was far away.
[...]

TM: Your family plays a huge part in your player's life. And especially your father...
GG: When I was 15, he had a heart attack. And seeing him so close to death has been such a shock for me. At that time, I didn't know I wanted to devote myself to tennis. What happened to him acted like a revelator. I had to do something with my life and I knew he was dreaming of me being a tennis pro. So I got involved in this career for him.
[...]

TM: Unlike Coria or Nalbandian, it seems that your federation didn't really help you when you were younger...
GG: They didn't do anything. They only remarked me when I was 18. I owe them nothing. So I have no reason to thank them for anything. The only thing I'm related to is for Davis Cup.
[...]

TM : Davis Cup, by the way. How much important is it for you?
GG: It is very important. It's even the second objective in my career. [...]
And I'm sure we can win with the players we have now.
[...]

TM: What's the atmosphere like in the team?
GG: I haven't played in DC for 1 year. At that time, it was really cheerful with my friends Zabaleta, Calleri, Chela and Arnold.[...] We can make it on every kind of ground.[...] Everybody knows that the economic situation in Argentina is not very good. And sport is the only thing that can bring joy to people. Winning the DC would be a sizeable event.
[...]

TM: When you were a kid, was there any player you admired?
GG: I liked Becker, but Vilas, he was my idol. Tennis didn't exist in Argentina before him. It developed thanks to him. I would never have won RG if he had not been the champion he was.
TM: And you, have you turned into an idol?
GG: Not at all(laughs). In Argentina, we have only 2 idols, Maradona and Vilas. I will never be as famous as they are. I'm very far from it.
TM: To conclude, you're known to be a introvert perso . Is there a hobby which helps you to slack?
GG: I play golf. It's a real passion. I got a handicap of 13-14. I forget everything when I'm on a ground.


Well, that's it! These are my favourites parts of the interview.
Sorry for those who already knew everything. Sorry Melu... :sad:
Sorry for the faults but I wanted to be quick as some of you seemed to be impatient.

Vale, I made you a promise. That's it!

Think I need some rest now... ;) ;) ;) Deserve some, no?

Big kisses to everyone. Bye

*Ljubica*
10-09-2004, 06:54 PM
Thanks Choupi :)

User id 7816
10-10-2004, 09:33 AM
Thanx a mil for it Choupi, again helps to know Gato a bit closer:)

p.s. and oh Gato, you're not the only who has that photo on the wall!!;)

taysbest
10-10-2004, 03:31 PM
Thanks for that Coupi!

lilianspring
10-10-2004, 04:33 PM
oh,so great work Choupi,Thanks very much.
I like it.

MeluG
10-10-2004, 07:12 PM
No Choupi that's ok. I've read it but couldn't translate it yet so your pieces where very helpfull to see if I understood correctly.
Keep up the good work!

Choupi
10-11-2004, 07:41 AM
Hi everybody, :wavey:

Well, I'm glad to read that many of you appreciated my transcription. ;)

Now I'm sure it was worth spending so much time translating and typing it...
If I can help, don't hesitate to ask me. ;)

Bye!

PerezRoldan
10-11-2004, 11:23 AM
Choupi, thanks for your translating work it adds to the languages on the Gaston forum, we've had Spanish, Swedish and English, see how much joy he brings.

Vale
10-12-2004, 07:00 PM
Choupi, that's a terrific job you did! I'm a translator and I know just how much hard work it is. But all for a good cause! The article is great.
Thanks,
Vale

MeluG
10-12-2004, 07:42 PM
Choupi:

I can answer your private msg for some reason, if you want send me an email through my website and I can reply it!

Adri
10-13-2004, 03:28 AM
Great interview, I loved it! Thanks Choupi for the translation :D!

Oh, that reminds me, I'm starting French classes on Thursday. I've never taken French before... wish me luck!

Choupi
10-13-2004, 08:47 AM
Choupi, that's a terrific job you did! I'm a translator and I know just how much hard work it is. But all for a good cause! The article is great.
Thanks,
Vale

Big thanks.
Glad to know you like my job, especially if you're a translator! Because I'm not.

Choupi
10-13-2004, 08:49 AM
Great interview, I loved it! Thanks Choupi for the translation :D!

Oh, that reminds me, I'm starting French classes on Thursday. I've never taken French before... wish me luck!

OK, so good luck and remember that french may seem very hard at the beginning. But never give up! If you need help, you know where to find me.

Choupi
10-13-2004, 09:00 AM
Choupi:

I can answer your private msg for some reason, if you want send me an email through my website and I can reply it!

Sorry Melu, but i've tried a thousand times to send you an email through your website but it never worked. I don't know why. Maybe there's something wrong here with our connection. I can surf only at work for now. And I'm working in a highschool. Sometimes, for some unknown and very mysterious reasons, some connections don't work out. We're trying to solve the problem but it'll take some time. So, the only way I could contact you was the private msg. Hope I didn't bother you too much with all this...and you don't feel like killing some french new fan daring to send you private msgs without knowing you!

Feel free to answer me or not. Whatever your choice may be, I'd understand.

Take care.

MeluG
10-13-2004, 05:10 PM
Choupi, I am answering you but somehow my replies never reach you.

Choupi
10-14-2004, 05:12 PM
Choupi, I am answering you but somehow my replies never reach you.

HI Melu, :wavey:

As I see, I'm not the only one to have trouble with some connections... ;)

Anyway, this is my email adress. No doubt it works, I'm using it everyday!
csornette@ac-nancy-metz.fr

Don't worry, it's my job adress. :angel:

The connection problem will be solved in a few days because I will have the web on my pc at home, so...it'll be easier.

Big thanks for answering me! Take care. Longing to read you...

Adri
10-14-2004, 10:54 PM
OK, so good luck and remember that french may seem very hard at the beginning. But never give up! If you need help, you know where to find me.

Merci! ;) I just came back form my first lesson, and it wasn't too hard, I liked it! I knew some stuff from before so I think I'll manage. After all it's my career [Modern Languages] and I want to learn as much as I can :D

Adri
10-14-2004, 11:38 PM
OK, just watched a small interview in the news [Fox Sports]... If I heard correctly, it seems Gaston is not going to Madrid because he has a small injury on his leg :(. He also talked about the Masters Cup and how he didn't want to risk anything and play well there, that's why he's not going to Madrid.

RogiFan88
10-15-2004, 01:04 AM
Nice avatar, Adri... I was wondering if Gaston was playing Madrid... too bad! He better be OK by Houston cos I want to see him!

Choupi
10-15-2004, 07:21 AM
OK, just watched a small interview in the news [Fox Sports]... If I heard correctly, it seems Gaston is not going to Madrid because he has a small injury on his leg :(. He also talked about the Masters Cup and how he didn't want to risk anything and play well there, that's why he's not going to Madrid.


:sad: :sad: :sad: :sad: :sad: :sad: :sad: :sad: :sad: :sad: :sad:

User id 7816
10-15-2004, 08:20 PM
Ohhhhhhhhhhhh:sad:

If all the missed tournaments mean he goes in Houston and wins the MC, then pleeeeaase, we can miss you for 2 more TMS!...;)
Seriosly, gotta get well that guy and just end the greatest year as he can!!! :bounce:

RogiFan88
10-15-2004, 11:06 PM
Is Gaston playing Paris? or Stockholm?

Adri
10-16-2004, 12:16 AM
He didn't say anything about Paris or Stockholm. He remarked that he still had an injury on his shoulder and a small one on his leg. Also that he was very excited to play the TMC and that he didn't know when he would get the chance to play it again, so that's why he didn't want to get more injured before it :).

Oh yeah, he also talked about Davis Cup and how it would be difficult against Czech Republic, with Berdych who's playing so well. But he was optimistic about the fact that they'll have to play in Argentina, and that could give them some advantage.

I rewatched the interview today so I could catch all those little details ;)

Vale
10-19-2004, 03:41 PM
According to the Argentine news service SportsYa, dated yesterday, Gaston is over his physical and personal problems (his father's heart problem), and will participate in the Basel and Paris tournaments before going to Houston!
Good luck Gato!!!
Vale

Choupi
10-19-2004, 03:58 PM
According to the Argentine news service SportsYa, dated yesterday, Gaston is over his physical and personal problems (his father's heart problem), and will participate in the Basel and Paris tournaments before going to Houston!
Good luck Gato!!!
Vale

Good news! Thanks for this Vale

We were waiting for him in Europe. I didn't know his father had recent heart problems. In the interview I translated from French Tennis Magazine, he said his father was okay when the journalist asked him if he was fine now. He had just explained the episode when he was 15 and the terrible shock seeing his father so close to death. I hope it's not too bad. I know what it means to lose somebody after a long disease and I know well how you feel during all the time you must fight with the one you care for. How upsetting it is. Well, enough with me...back to GG.

Wish him good luck for those tournaments, especially Berçy. It would be great after RG! Please, show them you're the real King of Paris! :worship:

Vale
10-19-2004, 04:54 PM
According to GGirl's post in the gastongaudio_group, his father underwent minor heart surgery (angioplastia?) to correct a long standing ailment, and is OK and back home.

Choupi
10-19-2004, 05:26 PM
According to GGirl's post in the gastongaudio_group, his father underwent minor heart surgery (angioplastia?) to correct a long standing ailment, and is OK and back home.

So, it's OK!

Just can't wait to see him play. Longing for Paris... :rolleyes:

Vale
10-19-2004, 06:41 PM
Hi Choupi,
Apparently we'd better wait before celebrating, as the Basel organizers have not yet been informed of his participation (Melu's news)
Hope it's not just inaccurate reporting!

Zetlandsk
10-20-2004, 04:56 AM
I don't care where he plays as long as he arrives in Houston and if he wins a match that is good enough. The health and the mental state are more important.

Choupi
10-20-2004, 07:51 AM
Hi Choupi,
Apparently we'd better wait before celebrating, as the Basel organizers have not yet been informed of his participation (Melu's news)
Hope it's not just inaccurate reporting!

HI Vale :wavey:

I've just checked on the official site of The Basel tournament. GG is on their list of players. So, how can the organizers say he has not confirmed participation and put him on the list of participating players? Who's wrong?
Just wait and see...

Boludo
10-20-2004, 08:03 AM
Gaston will remain on the list, but he has until Friday to confirm whether he is going to play Basel or not.

Vale
10-20-2004, 02:19 PM
I read the gastongaudio_group forum in Spanish, and last night Paola wrote that GG had been training, that he was in good form, that apparently he's overcome his physical problems, and that he's due to travel to Basel on Thursday or Friday!!!!!

Choupi
10-20-2004, 05:50 PM
I read the gastongaudio_group forum in Spanish, and last night Paola wrote that GG had been training, that he was in good form, that apparently he's overcome his physical problems, and that he's due to travel to Basel on Thursday or Friday!!!!!

Thank you Vale, :wavey:

Very good news. Seems in good form. that's OK. I was a bit worried about that. I was wondering if he would be fit for the upcoming tournaments because he simply hasn't played since the Us Open, except the exhibition in Brazil.

Never mind. We'll be there to cheer him. We're waiting for that for such a long time, so trust us. ;)

Vale
10-21-2004, 05:41 PM
Communiqué

DAVIDOFF SWISS INDOORS BASEL 2004:
WORLD NUMBER ONE ROGER FEDERER AGAINST THE PICK OF THE CROP

ATP EURO 1 MILLION TOURNAMENT FROM 23 TO 31 OCTOBER 2004

Top class line-up

The new trendsetter in world tennis, the ATP no.1 and this year’s treble Grand Slam winner Roger Federer, French Open champion Gaston Gaudio, Olympic gold medallist Nicolas Massu, the world’s number one in 2003 Juan Carlos Ferrero, and two former winners in Basel, Tim Henman and David Nalbandian, head an explosive line-up for the Davidoff Swiss Indoors.

In the run-up to the world championships in Houston, tennis fans can look
forward to a host of thrilling matches between 23 and 31 October 2004. The chase for ATP points and the top-bracket prize money are further factors behind this powerful entry field.

The last player to qualify directly for the main tournament currently ranks 51st on the ATP list. The tournament now features this year’s Grand Slam champions (Federer, Gaudio), the reigning world champion (Federer), the Olympic gold medallist (Massu) and the Davis Cup finalists from Spain (Ferrero, Robredo, Nadal).

"Tradition and reputation, built up steadily over the years, are now bearing fruit,” is how Tournament Director Roger Brennwald explains this exclusive line-up, where each player is capable of beating any other on the day.

Mind the outsiders

Roger Federer, the world’s number one ranking player since 2 February and scheduled to play his first match on Tuesday, 26 October, will be taking on a field in his native city that rivals the quality of a Masters Series tournament. Winning this trophy will require him to produce his very best tennis five times over.
Ivan Ljubicic, the Croatian with the powerful serve who knocked Federer out of last year’s tournament, is back at the starting line. Two other big servers, Mario Ancic and Taylor Dent, will be putting in their first appearance in Basel. Highly rated outsiders include Paradorn Srichaphan (another first in Basel), 18-year-old shooting star Rafael Nadal and the up-and-coming Rainer Schüttler, Nicolas Kiefer and Florian Mayer, all from Germany.

Only two former Davidoff Swiss Indoors winners are in the Basel line-up: Tim Henman (1998/2001) from England, currently very much a man in form, and the Argentinian David Nalbandian (2002). This is an indication of how quickly fortunes change at the top of men’s tennis.

Draw broadcast live from the “Rathaus”

At the invitation of the Cantonal Government of Basel-Stadt, the draw for the main tournament will be held at the Rathaus (Council Hall) in Basel on 25 October 2004, from 12 to 1 pm. The eagerly anticipated ceremony will be broadcast live by Telebasel, the local TV station.

Zetlandsk
11-02-2004, 06:34 AM
http://www.bnpparibasmasters.org/


Paris - 01/11/04

After his crazy run in the 2004 French Open, Gaston Gaudio is back on the Parisian soil. However this time it is at the BNP Paribas Masters that the Argentine will try and conquer a new title, and who knows why not go for a Parisian repeat

Gaston, how does it feel to be back in Paris?

I went back to Roland-Garros. It felt nice, but not comparable to what I felt in June when I won the tournament. Nevertheless it was nice to be back. In any case I know that never again I will feel what I felt in June. It was a once in a life time!

What does the BNP Paribas Masters mean to you?

I like this tournament a lot, but the surface is not exactly adapted to my game. But I love being in Paris that it doesn't really matter. In fact I have a lot of friends here, and I find that there is a great atmosphere in this tournament.

Do you remember the six match points you saved versus Richard Gasquet in the first round before beating him?

Perfectly. Richard had the crowd behind him. I was extremely lucky to not have lost in the first round. There is no doubt that the Parisian public now knows who I am and of course I would like to win the BNP Paribas Masters, but I don't know if I will be able re-enact my performance of the past French Open. Let's wait and see.

(Eli Weinstein)

Choupi
11-02-2004, 09:11 AM
Hi Zetlandsk!

Thanks for this interview but Vale had already posted it yesterday in the "Gaston's back in Paris" thread. But anyway, it was nice to read it again... :wavey:

Vale
11-02-2004, 07:35 PM
This article appeared in today's Internet edition of Clarin of Buenos Aires (latest news):

14:34 | Clarin
Gastón Gaudio ya tiene rival para mañana en París: Feliciano López

El campeón de Roland Garros dijo que "esta ciudad es la más linda del mundo". Confía en llegar bien lejos en este Masters Series.

"París es la ciudad que más me gusta en el mundo", dijo Gastón Gaudio, noveno jugador mundial, antes de comenzar mañana su actuación en el Masters Series de esta ciudad, prueba de la ATP que reparte 2,45 millones de euros en premios, ante el español Feliciano López, en partido de segunda ronda.

El argentino, que cumplirá 26 años en diciembre, ganador de Roland Garros en junio pasado, regresó por primera vez a la capital donde conquistó su torneo de Gran Slam. "Volver a pisar la arcilla de Roland Garros, donde vine a entrenarme estos días, fue una hermosa sensación, revivimos todos los momentos pasados, que fueron maravillosos", dijo. "Pese a que las tribunas estaban vacías ahora, pusimos en marcha nuestra imaginación para recordar el momento de ganar mi primer Gran Slam", contó.

Junto a Mariano Hood en dobles, cayó ante los primeros cabezas de serie, la pareja bahameño/canadiense Mark Knowles/Daniel Nestor en dos sets, por 6-3 y 6-4, tras haber resistido en gran parte del primer set.

La presencia de Gastón Gaudio en Bercy para el Masters Series de París, después de haber estado un tiempo parado, le sirve como preparación para el Torneo de Maestros de tenis de Houston, en Estados Unidos, del 15 al 21 de noviembre, con 3,7 millones de dólares en premios. "En Houston, estarán presentes los ocho mejores jugadores actuales del mundo. Será un torneo muy difícil. Tendré que tener una motivación mayor para poder estar al mismo nivel de jugadores que pasan por un buen momento. Tendré que estar bien predispuesto. Siempre es bueno jugar un par de partidos antes de llegar a ese tipo de torneo y ponerme un poco más en forma. Y prepararme para ese torneo, es importante", concluyó.

My translation:

GASTON GAUDIO ALREADY HAS A RIVAL FOR TOMORROW IN PARIS: Feliciano Lopez

The Roland Garros champion said that “this is the most beautiful city in the world”. He in confident that he can go far in this Masters Series.

“Paris is the city I like best in the world”, said Gaston Gaudio, ninth ranked player in the world, before commencing his participation tomorrow in the Masters Series of this city, an ATP event that distributes 2,45 million euros in prize money, against the Spaniard Feliciano Lopez, in a second round match.

The Argentinian, who will be 26 in December, winner of Roland Garros last June, returned for the first time to the capital where he conquered his Grand Slam tournament. “To set foot on the clay of Roland Garros again, where I’ve been practicing these last few days, was a wonderful sensation, we relived all those moments we went through, which were marvellous” he said. “Even though the stands are empty now, we used our imagination to remember the moment when I won my first Grand Slam”, he related.

Playing doubles with Mariano Hood, he lost to the first ranked players, Mark Knowles/ Daniel Nestor, the pair from Bahamas and Canada, in two sets, 6-3 and 6-4, after having resisted during much of the first set.

Gaston Gaudio’s presence in Bercy for the Paris Masters Series, after not having played for some time, will serve him as preparation for the Tennis Masters Cup in Houston, USA, from the 15th to the 21st of November, with 3,7 million dollars in prize money.
“The current eight best players in the world will be present in Houston. It will be a very difficult tournament. I will have to have greater motivation to be at the same level of players who are going through a good moment. I will have to have a good attitude. It’s always good to play a couple of matches before competing in that kind of tournament, and to try to be more in form. And it’s important for me to prepare for that tournament”, he concluded.

Vale
11-02-2004, 07:45 PM
This article appeared in today's Internet edition of Clarin of Buenos Aires (latest news):

14:34 | Clarin
Gastón Gaudio ya tiene rival para mañana en París: Feliciano López

El campeón de Roland Garros dijo que "esta ciudad es la más linda del mundo". Confía en llegar bien lejos en este Masters Series.

"París es la ciudad que más me gusta en el mundo", dijo Gastón Gaudio, noveno jugador mundial, antes de comenzar mañana su actuación en el Masters Series de esta ciudad, prueba de la ATP que reparte 2,45 millones de euros en premios, ante el español Feliciano López, en partido de segunda ronda.

El argentino, que cumplirá 26 años en diciembre, ganador de Roland Garros en junio pasado, regresó por primera vez a la capital donde conquistó su torneo de Gran Slam. "Volver a pisar la arcilla de Roland Garros, donde vine a entrenarme estos días, fue una hermosa sensación, revivimos todos los momentos pasados, que fueron maravillosos", dijo. "Pese a que las tribunas estaban vacías ahora, pusimos en marcha nuestra imaginación para recordar el momento de ganar mi primer Gran Slam", contó.

Junto a Mariano Hood en dobles, cayó ante los primeros cabezas de serie, la pareja bahameño/canadiense Mark Knowles/Daniel Nestor en dos sets, por 6-3 y 6-4, tras haber resistido en gran parte del primer set.

La presencia de Gastón Gaudio en Bercy para el Masters Series de París, después de haber estado un tiempo parado, le sirve como preparación para el Torneo de Maestros de tenis de Houston, en Estados Unidos, del 15 al 21 de noviembre, con 3,7 millones de dólares en premios. "En Houston, estarán presentes los ocho mejores jugadores actuales del mundo. Será un torneo muy difícil. Tendré que tener una motivación mayor para poder estar al mismo nivel de jugadores que pasan por un buen momento. Tendré que estar bien predispuesto. Siempre es bueno jugar un par de partidos antes de llegar a ese tipo de torneo y ponerme un poco más en forma. Y prepararme para ese torneo, es importante", concluyó.

My translation:

GASTON GAUDIO ALREADY HAS A RIVAL FOR TOMORROW IN PARIS: Feliciano Lopez

The Roland Garros champion said that “this is the most beautiful city in the world”. He in confident that he can go far in this Masters Series.

“Paris is the city I like best in the world”, said Gaston Gaudio, ninth ranked player in the world, before commencing his participation tomorrow in the Masters Series of this city, an ATP event that distributes 2,45 million euros in prize money, against the Spaniard Feliciano Lopez, in a second round match.

The Argentinian, who will be 26 in December, winner of Roland Garros last June, returned for the first time to the capital where he conquered his Grand Slam tournament. “To set foot on the clay of Roland Garros again, where I’ve been practicing these last few days, was a wonderful sensation, we relived all those moments we went through, which were marvellous” he said. “Even though the stands are empty now, we used our imagination to remember the moment when I won my first Grand Slam”, he related.

Playing doubles with Mariano Hood, he lost to the first ranked players, Mark Knowles/ Daniel Nestor, the pair from Bahamas and Canada, in two sets, 6-3 and 6-4, after having resisted during much of the first set.

Gaston Gaudio’s presence in Bercy for the Paris Masters Series, after not having played for some time, will serve him as preparation for the Tennis Masters Cup in Houston, USA, from the 15th to the 21st of November, with 3,7 million dollars in prize money.
“The current eight best players in the world will be present in Houston. It will be a very difficult tournament. I will have to have greater motivation to be at the same level of players who are going through a good moment. I will have to have a good attitude. It’s always good to play a couple of matches before competing in that kind of tournament, and to try to be more in form. And it’s important for me to prepare for that tournament”, he concluded.

*Ljubica*
11-04-2004, 06:20 AM
Gaston has confirmed that he will play in the Copa Argentina this year between 16th-19th December. Other players taking part are David Nalbandian, Agustin Calleri, Juan-Ignacio Chela, Nicolas Massu, Juan Monaco, Mariano Zabaleta and Guillermo Canas.

Action Jackson
11-04-2004, 06:32 AM
Yes, that is a great group and I know the great Melu plus any other Argentines living near BA will be there to give us reports of course.

It's rare that there are actually 8 people I like or at least don't dislike in an 8 man tournament.

nenadeSergio
11-04-2004, 01:56 PM
Just wish this to be on TV which obviously won´t be - in my country of course. :(

Vale
11-04-2004, 04:07 PM
By the way, it's an exhibition tournament and will be played on hard. I live in Bariloche, in Patagonia, 1,700 kms away, so will only be able to see it on TV (if they show it!)

Choupi
11-04-2004, 04:24 PM
By the way, it's an exhibition tournament and will be played on hard. I live in Bariloche, in Patagonia, 1,700 kms away, so will only be able to see it on TV (if they show it!)

Don't worry about the distance, it's worse for me and I won't have any chance to see it in France, so....

*Ljubica*
11-04-2004, 05:36 PM
By the way, it's an exhibition tournament and will be played on hard. I live in Bariloche, in Patagonia, 1,700 kms away, so will only be able to see it on TV (if they show it!)

I believe it's being televised by ESPN+ which is no good for us here in Europe, - but guess you will be able to see that Vale. And wow - you are so lucky living in Patagonia - it's so beautiful there :)

joeb_uk
11-04-2004, 05:47 PM
Very nice lineup, lets hope they are all fit to play (and do attend the event). Hopefully someone is able to supply matches on dvd

Choupi
11-05-2004, 10:52 AM
:wavey: Here's the translation of a short article published in L'Equipe Magazine yesterday.

The other Paris of Gaudio

From the east to the west, Paris shows too many different faces that so far, only one player has managed to win both RG and Berçy, Andre Agassi. Yesterday, Gaston Gaudio has been added to the long list of French Open winners unable to stand out from the rest at the POBP.
For the Argentinean, the post RG time has not been that glorious. Right after the triumph of his life, he had reached and lost 3 finals in a row, Bastad, Stuttgart and Kitzbuhel. What's new since then? He has only won 2 matches in more than 3 months. This wretched shame can be explained by tiredness and his going through personal hard times. His father has indeed had another heart attack, from which he has not totally recovered so far. His mother too had to deal with health troubles. Anyway, it's not been a great time for the Argentinean, though he's been so happy to walk upon the parisian ground, may it be Taraflex. "I knew that the Berçy surface would not suit me" he said after his 3 sets defeat against Feliciano Lopez. " But I went back once to RG to train (indoor), and it's been such an incredible feeling to do so. I couldn't tread the Center Court underfoot but it was the same. Well, almost the same. This time, the stands were empty." Yesterday, after his loss, Gaudio has left Berçy to go back to RG a last time before leaving the capital for good. Just to pose for the picture and to get heartened again, before next year in may 2005.

That's it. Nothing really new except his mother's health trouble. Don't know where they got this info.

*Ljubica*
11-05-2004, 11:44 AM
Thanks Choupi for translating the article I was only in Paris for a couple of days this year (on my way home from Basel) - I saw Gaston a couple of times, but didn't see his match against Lopez because I had to be back home by then :sad:

Choupi
11-05-2004, 12:17 PM
At least Rosie, you were in Paris....I wasn't! :sad:

Maybe we'll meet there next year either for RG or for Berçy!

*Ljubica*
11-05-2004, 12:28 PM
At least Rosie, you were in Paris....I wasn't! :sad:

Maybe we'll meet there next year either for RG or for Berçy!

That would be nice. I am always in RG (at least for the first week), and usually in Bercy for the whole week too. However, - this year I spent 3 weeks away in Vienna, Madrid and Basel prior to Bercy, so when David withdrew from Bercy I just felt it was the right time to come back home, go back to work and start earning some money again for my next trips!

Vale
11-05-2004, 12:45 PM
Choupi, thanks for that translation! Here in Argentina I read in another forum that his mother had suffered a peak of high blood pressure and had been hospitalized at the same time as his father. I never saw it confirmed officially, but I think it's true. What an awful time he must have gone through!

Choupi
11-05-2004, 01:22 PM
Yes Vale, he must have gone through very difficult times...I didn't know if the info on his mother was confirmed. I was a bit wondering where they got it as I had never read or heard about it before. Poor Gaston, he really must have lived sthg so hard. It's always hard when illness strikes close to you and it is even more when it comes to your parents. I know what I'm talking about, I lost my mum from cancer. I was a little youger than Gaston. So I can perfectly understand all his worrying and the reasons which have kept him away from the courts for so long. I'd really love to see him have a good thrill in Houston, mostly to prove the "unbelieving ones" that he's strong enough to have dealt with serious personal trouble as well as with getting fit for the Masters Cup.

Choupi
11-05-2004, 01:25 PM
That would be nice. I am always in RG (at least for the first week), and usually in Bercy for the whole week too. However, - this year I spent 3 weeks away in Vienna, Madrid and Basel prior to Bercy, so when David withdrew from Bercy I just felt it was the right time to come back home, go back to work and start earning some money again for my next trips!

Rosie, I'll be in RG the 1st week too. Still don't know exactly when, either the friday or the weekend. Depends on a friend's possibility to come with and on the kindness of my boss! But sure, I'll be there!

*Ljubica*
11-05-2004, 02:33 PM
Rosie, I'll be in RG the 1st week too. Still don't know exactly when, either the friday or the weekend. Depends on a friend's possibility to come with and on the kindness of my boss! But sure, I'll be there!

Look forward to it :) And by the way - just wanted to say how sorry I was to hear about your Mum. I also lost my Mum when I was younger than Gaston, so I know what it is like to suffer in that way. I know he likes to keep things like this private and within the family and close friends, which is why it has not been mentioned here much before, and I can totally understand that.

Take care,

Love,

Rosie

Choupi
11-05-2004, 03:44 PM
Look forward to it :) And by the way - just wanted to say how sorry I was to hear about your Mum. I also lost my Mum when I was younger than Gaston, so I know what it is like to suffer in that way. I know he likes to keep things like this private and within the family and close friends, which is why it has not been mentioned here much before, and I can totally understand that.

Take care,

Love,

Rosie

Thank you Rosie for your kind msg. I'm sincerely touched. And of course I can totally understand that this should remain private for Gaston. Though knowing it now helps to see things differently.

Adri
11-06-2004, 02:37 AM
Choupi, I'm really sorry too [also to Rosie]. I wouldn't know what to do if I lost one of my parents. My mom had to go through a tough time once but thank God she's perfect now. I understand too why Gaston like to keep this things private, I mean it's hard to talk about those issues.

Now about that article [sorry for the sudden change of subject], Choupi, could you show us by any chance that picture they mention at the article, that he got taken when he practiced at RG? I looked for it at l'equipe's website but couldn't find it :(.

Action Jackson
11-06-2004, 03:56 AM
Thanks for the translations and of course it's understandable that Gaston wants to keep things private when it concerns his family.

Choupi
11-06-2004, 08:11 AM
Choupi, I'm really sorry too [also to Rosie]. I wouldn't know what to do if I lost one of my parents. My mom had to go through a tough time once but thank God she's perfect now. I understand too why Gaston like to keep this things private, I mean it's hard to talk about those issues.

Now about that article [sorry for the sudden change of subject], Choupi, could you show us by any chance that picture they mention at the article, that he got taken when he practiced at RG? I looked for it at l'equipe's website but couldn't find it :(.

Adri, I'm sorry but I can't help on this coz the pic they mentioned was not taken by them. I think it must have been some official shooting but I still don't know where it's gonna be published. I'll let you know as soon as I get the info.
And thanks for my Mum...

Choupi
11-06-2004, 11:22 PM
Adri, I'm back with what you're waiting for! And even better than what you expect... ;) Coz it is no pic. It's the shooting of Gaston going back to RG 2 days ago, threading the Center Court underfoot.

Here's the link. Enjoy!

http://eurosport.com/home/pages/v4/l0/s57/playermultimedia_lng0_rub9_spo57_ven18319.shtml

sportyspice
11-07-2004, 01:29 PM
Thank's choupi.i also was lookink for the that link,because i missed it on tv.it was a pleasure seeing Gaston smiling again .

Choupi
11-07-2004, 02:33 PM
Yeah!!! He was smiling and of course, so many good memories were coming back into his mind! He went back there on purpose, to feel the glory of all his biggest achievement so far, just before Houston. :worship: Let's hope he will keep this in his mind until the tough matches he'll have to play there. All will depend on what will be in his mind at that time. It's all in the head! He can do some great performance, he just has to believe in himself. It's not his suitable ground, everybody agrees with that. But don't try to pretend he has never won any match indoors and on that kind of surface! I tell you, it's all in his head. ;)

taysbest
11-07-2004, 06:21 PM
thank you for posting that link Choupi! Great to see the video!

Sommarsverige
11-07-2004, 07:57 PM
It was great to see the video!
Gaston seemed very relaxed and happy :-)

Adri
11-07-2004, 10:36 PM
Adri, I'm back with what you're waiting for! And even better than what you expect... ;) Coz it is no pic. It's the shooting of Gaston going back to RG 2 days ago, threading the Center Court underfoot.

Here's the link. Enjoy!

http://eurosport.com/home/pages/v4/l0/s57/playermultimedia_lng0_rub9_spo57_ven18319.shtml


Oh my my!!! Merci beaucoup, Choupi!!!! :hug:!!! I'll watch it inmediatly! Tu es trés sympa!!! [hehehe, there I go practising my still very little French]

Choupi
11-08-2004, 05:19 AM
:wavey: But you're welcome Adri! And though your French is still "very little", it is very good! So merci beaucoup! ;)

Action Jackson
11-09-2004, 07:12 AM
Thanks for the link and it was good to see him return to his spiritual home.

RogiFan88
11-12-2004, 02:35 AM
Hola, guys!

I saw that video of Gaston on Eurosport last week when I was in Valencia... what a nice surprise! He's still so cute and humble, isn't he? George w have loved it...

novanora
11-13-2004, 02:10 PM
hey, these are the caps for Eurosports video, guess you all have enjoy it! back to winning RG center court, good memory for Gaston and his fans :D

*Ljubica*
11-13-2004, 05:04 PM
Thanks Nova :)

Adri
11-14-2004, 12:06 AM
Thanks for posting those, novanora! I tried doing screencaps myself but failed... the little screen went black...

RogiFan88
11-14-2004, 01:08 AM
thanks for the cute Eurosport pix... looks like a little kid... very cute indeed!! one of these days I shall talk to Gaston [when I have a voice, that is... ]

Fedex
11-14-2004, 04:39 AM
Thanks for posting those, novanora. :)

Action Jackson
11-14-2004, 05:36 AM
Thanks for the pics Nova.

novanora
11-14-2004, 08:04 AM
Thanks for posting those, novanora! I tried doing screencaps myself but failed... the little screen went black...
Adri, it's not that difficult to do the caps :) what i do is just use streambox to download the video clip, and use some common multimedia players to make the caps, glad you all like that!

it's nightmare for u when Gaston's precious RG memory turn into totally black night screen though :lol:

jazz_girl
11-14-2004, 11:54 AM
Today's interview:
-It's been 5 months since RG, how much has your life changed since then?
-My personal life hasn't changed that much. I'm still close to my family and friends, everything's the same. The only difference is that people recognize me a bit more in Buenos Aires.

-And in the circuit, are you seen with different eyes?
-Well...in tennis level, there are some changes. You have more things coming at you. In some tournaments in which before you were unnoticed, all of the sudden you are the center of attention. And now I have the possibility of playing this tournament. What else can I ask for?

-What Gaudio will be seen in Houston?
-The best, I hope. Phisically I'm 100%. Tennistically(sp?), I was quite a while without playing, but I've prepared well in Miami and I'll get here well. It was a tough training, like it has to be for a Masters.

-You'll have a special debut...Federer is waiting for the inaugural match.
-Yeah...What can I say about Federer? He's a machine.

-Can you beat him?
-Yeah...but I don't know how (laughs). It's clear that there are no misteries here, they are the best. Every match will be like playing a final. And you can win or lose.

-Can you see yourself in the final?
-Look, when I got to RG I said I didn't know if I was gonna make it through the first round. I can lose the 3 matches or be in the SF. It also depends on luck. If in every tournament you have to have some luck, much more in this one.

-You're majority. There are three Argentinians among the 9...
-I can't believe it. Being a country much smaller than the USA, they just have one player and we have three. I'd like to see this being more valued.

-Do you consider that it's not like that?
-Well...there are times in which the press critizises us, it's not fair. We're going through the best time in Argentinian tennis. For example David (Nalbandian) was critizised for losing a final, instead of saying that he reached two finals in a row. In a country with the population that Argentina has, having 3 Argentinians in this Masters is a very rare thing. We have to cherish that and give it the real dimension it has.

-The next step in Argentinian tennis is to win the Davis Cup?
-With the team and the player we have, it's the step that everyone of us should make. It's the goal that everyone of us should make for next year, or the other one. I think this is the best moment; we should take advantage of the moment that some players are having to win it.

-Can we win the DC in 2005?
-The draw was pretty complicated because we would get Australia in the second round. But let's not forget that David was a Wimbledon finalist.

Action Jackson
11-14-2004, 12:09 PM
Muchas gracias jazz for the translation it's great to read he still has the humour and the sense of realism, but please get some self-confidence for the first match.

:hug: :hug: jazzita

Can I use your translation in the yahoo group? I would only correct the 1 spelling mistake.

jazz_girl
11-14-2004, 12:13 PM
Sure use it! :yeah:

*Ljubica*
11-14-2004, 12:18 PM
Thanks Jazz - must admit I saw the article this morning but was lazy and decided to wait for you to translate it (I knew your would :) ) And besides you're so much better at it than me!

jazz_girl
11-14-2004, 12:19 PM
LOL! you lazy girl :hug: Thanks ;)

jazz_girl
11-14-2004, 12:22 PM
I forgot to give you the link:
http://www.clarin.com/diario/2004/11/14/deportes/d-08601.htm

FryslanBoppe
11-14-2004, 12:22 PM
Your English is great jazz and thanks for the article. It's good to see Gaston in a good mood and hope he can pull a few surprises.

*Ljubica*
11-14-2004, 12:24 PM
LOL! you lazy girl :hug: Thanks ;)

Guilty as charged ;)

Action Jackson
11-14-2004, 12:26 PM
Yes, Rosie you are guilty and jazz thanks again for the translation.

I would do the same if David ever got his arse over to Scandinavia.

jazz_girl
11-14-2004, 12:37 PM
I forgot to translate the first paragraphs before the actual interview:

For sure, in some afternoon in the Temperley Lawn tennis, when his ilusions of kid were winning an interclub, has thought about this, has imagined it..."After a lifetime of playing tennis, everyone's dream is to be here. It's something that has come true and now all I have left is to play the best part I can", recognizes Gastón Gaudio, in the Westsite Tennis Club. He's the only among the eight tennis player that will make his debut in the Masters, the top date for tennis with the best players of the season.

It's cold in Houston. The temperature was below the 10°C and the sun of the previous days are begining to be missed. The rain, that might seriously complicate the tournament, threats every now and then. But the Roland Garros champion has his head somewhere else, he's confident among so many big stars. He looks secure, focused, "he's in full in the tournament", like he says it himself.
With the Rome shirt (the 10 of Totti), trains very hard with Carlos Moyá. After that will be time of the official ceremony. And there, with the 9 players (Cañas arrived a little while before time with a smile from ear to ear), poses for the pictures with a dark blue suit and his characteristic tied up hair. In his look, in his gestures, he sense he's about to play something big, a special tournament. Then, Gaudio accesses to a informal chat, friendly. "When the year was starting and even more, how I was coming, it didn't even cross my mind to have this possibility. But then I started playing better, I won Roland Garros. From then on anything could happen...And here I am", comments while he laughs.

User id 7816
11-14-2004, 01:01 PM
Ooo Gato :worship: :worship:.......now it's only one thing you can do - tear them to pieces baby! http://www.mainzelahr.de/smile/froehlich/turk182.gif :lol:

thax jazz!

FryslanBoppe
11-14-2004, 01:57 PM
Gaston is all class what can I say.

Choupi
11-14-2004, 03:35 PM
Thanks for the translation Jazz!

He's objective, confident, well and tough trained. Can't wait to watch him tomorrow!!!!!!! :p Do your best and most of all, carpe diem!!!!!

RogiFan88
11-14-2004, 04:31 PM
gracias, Jazz, you answered my question fr the Rogi thread... Gaston practising w Marat, then Carlos, Rogi next??!!!

FryslanBoppe
11-14-2004, 04:35 PM
gracias, Jazz, you answered my question fr the Rogi thread... Gaston practising w Marat, then Carlos, Rogi next??!!!

I am not sure if they will practice on the morning of their match together. Maybe he will train with Canas or Henman.

Vale
11-15-2004, 04:29 PM
He trained with Federer on Saturday, and was beating him 5-2 when Roger called it quits. Could it be an omen?
Merde, Gaston!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Choupi
11-15-2004, 04:37 PM
If only Vale!!!!!!!

Well I believe in signs so.... :p Can't wait to see the match!!!!!!! :rolleyes:

User id 7816
11-15-2004, 04:51 PM
whoaa really??!......heheh, signs are everywhere right, we just have to know to recognize them...so....hope he can bring it to the match!!!... :bounce:

reiko
11-15-2004, 05:46 PM
I, too, believe in signs. Actually, at RG2004, I had several signs
- or maybe I should call it a gut feeling -
which told me that Gaston would be raising the Cup.....

Houston interview scripts:
http://www.asapsports.com/tennis/04houston.html


From the interviews:

Q. Gaudio, do you think his experience maybe can come into play a little bit?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, maybe a little bit. This is obviously a huge week for him, Gaston. Coming here, not being in this situation before, first time in the Top 10 for him, and to be here in the Masters Cup is probably just a dream in itself for him. So, yeah, he's going out there, though, with absolutely nothing to lose. We all know this isn't his favorite surface; obviously, clay is. But he's going to be a tough competitor. He's got nothing to lose out there. You got to go out there and just worry about your game and try and get the wins on the board.

==========================================

Q. What is your opinion on the Argentine tennis players?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, there's many of them. There's many, many of them. Some very good ones as well. So we have one in the draw, right, and one alternate?

Q. Two in the draw.

ROGER FEDERER: Oh, Gaston Gaudio. Two in the draw and one alternate, sorry. It just shows how strong it really is. Tennis in Argentina right now, they have basically three or four Davis Cup teams. I know Coria and Nalbandian, these guys from Juniors still. There's a lot of players then when I came on tour. It's really amazing to see how well they can play on all the surfaces now. It's not only the clay that is their favorite surface, but especially on the hard courts they are starting to play better and better.


:confused: Wonder if Federer realizes by now that he is going to play Gaston in his first match.....

User id 7816
11-15-2004, 06:01 PM
Roger:( forgetting Gaston,well he may but pull your nose tonight ;).....gosh, they really dont concider Gaston a threat , how nice, this way they'll be even more shocked when he wins :devil:
its nice Roger recognizes the strength of the argentine tennis tho, I really just hope Gato will make them respect it even more and on hard courts after the MC.

Vale
11-15-2004, 06:28 PM
Isn't it odd that he forgot him, as Gaston was winning 5-2 in the practice set they played on Saturday, before Federer called it a day? (That's in today's newspaper La Nacion, one of the most serious in Argentina)

jazz_girl
11-15-2004, 06:37 PM
I hope after today's match he doesn't forget Gastón anymore ;)

*Ljubica*
11-15-2004, 08:02 PM
It's such a shame about this damn rain just when I had settled down to enjoy the match - and interrupting Gaston's serve too :devil:

Sommarsverige
11-15-2004, 08:18 PM
Just so typical ...

Can it please stop raining!

*Ljubica*
11-19-2004, 04:15 PM
Hi guys..........thought you might like to know that Gaston is going to play in the Kooyong Exhibition tournament next year as part of his warm-up for the Australian Open. The other players taking part are David Nalbandian (who is the holder of the title), Agassi, Federer, Roddick, Srichaphan, Henman and Massu. David really loved this tourney last year - hope Gaston enjoys it too :)

joeb_uk
11-19-2004, 05:09 PM
Yeah rosie it is a good tournament, and its nice that gaston and david are there!!! and of course quite a few other top players. Last year had some ringers in it, but this year looks like it will be a great event.
Guess i have to wait for the dvd lol, before i can see the matches tho

*Ljubica*
11-19-2004, 05:11 PM
Yeah rosie it is a good tournament, and its nice that gaston and david are there!!! and of course quite a few other top players. Last year had some ringers in it, but this year looks like it will be a great event.
Guess i have to wait for the dvd lol, before i can see the matches tho

Me too joeb - my budget and very understanding Boss don't stretch to a couple of weeks in Australia as well as all my other travelling I'm afraid!

joeb_uk
11-19-2004, 05:33 PM
who was there again last year?
gasquet?
federer
roddick
david
agassi
ginepri?
grosjean?

*Ljubica*
11-19-2004, 05:47 PM
who was there again last year?
gasquet?
federer
roddick
david
agassi
ginepri?
grosjean?

Last year's line-up was:-

David
Agassi
Federer
Roddick
Dent
Ginepri
Thomas Johansson
Sebastian Grosjean

I even attached a little photo of them for you :)

joeb_uk
11-19-2004, 05:57 PM
Dent
Ginepri
Thomas Johansson
Sebastian Grosjean

aha thanks rosie, these guys not being there this year is a good thing for sure :) much nicer list this time

*Ljubica*
11-19-2004, 06:16 PM
Dent
Ginepri
Thomas Johansson
Sebastian Grosjean

aha thanks rosie, these guys not being there this year is a good thing for sure :) much nicer list this time

Well I like Seb Grosjean quite a lot actually, and I'm pretty indifferent to Johansson - but no Dent and Ginepri is a definate improvement :)

jazz_girl
11-21-2004, 12:44 PM
http://www.ole.clarin.com/jsp/v3/pagina.jsp?pagId=873059
Davin on Gastón:
"Gastón es impredecible, debe mejorar eso. Da ventajas mentales ante tipos como Federer o Hewitt. Ellos tienen una chance y la toman; Gaudio las desperdicia. Cuando te acordás, te sacaron en dos sets. Compiten diferente"

"Gastón is unpredictable, he must improve that. He gives mental advantages to guys like Federer or Hewitt. They have a chance and they take it; Gaudio lets them go by. When you remember, they beat you in two sets. They compete in a different way".

Action Jackson
11-21-2004, 12:49 PM
http://www.ole.clarin.com/jsp/v3/pagina.jsp?pagId=873059
Davin on Gastón:
"Gastón es impredecible, debe mejorar eso. Da ventajas mentales ante tipos como Federer o Hewitt. Ellos tienen una chance y la toman; Gaudio las desperdicia. Cuando te acordás, te sacaron en dos sets. Compiten diferente"

"Gastón is unpredictable, he must improve that. He gives mental advantages to guys like Federer or Hewitt. They have a chance and they take it; Gaudio lets them go by. When you remember, they beat you in two sets. They compete in a different way".

Thanks for that jazz and it's so true. I know this personally when I spoke to him this year and told him he was playing Hrbaty and said "no, I don't want to play him" and like that, he is already behind on the scoreboard.

I will try again. :)

Choupi
11-21-2004, 01:12 PM
For all those who may be interested by the whole interview given gy Gaston to the French Tennis Magazine of september, from which I've only typed excerpts here a few weeks ago, you can find it on the site of my signature. Sorry but it would be much much too long to type it here again!!!! ;)

Action Jackson
11-21-2004, 01:38 PM
Good interivews Choupi, I am not sure if has been posted here. You should just copy and paste it into here. I mean the one I read that said September was in English.

Action Jackson
11-21-2004, 02:21 PM
Merci Choupi,

It's no problem I will paste it here in full.

INTERVIEW FROM TENNIS MAGAZINE (SEPTEMBER 04)

You can find the original interview in the Tennis Magazine from September .

“For me Roland Garros has been kind of an earthquake”

The latest Roland Garros final, of course you remember. But the name of the winner? Those who keep on thinking that Guillermo Coria is the one who has lifted up the “Coupe des Mousquetaires” must still be numerous, as he had so outrageously dominated the match, before letting it go away, in spite of an advantage of two sets and later on of two match points.

Knocked over by cramps Coria finally fell down in front of the most unawaited winner of the French Open. Aged 25, his compatriot, unseeded Gaston Gaudio spectacularly entered the world tennis bigwigs, among whom nobody, not even him, would have pictured him before. But after a couple of years on the ATP circuit, during which he had won two tournaments and had reached number 23 on March 2003, the player from Buenos Aires has turned into a great champion under the Parisian blue skies. In this interview he has given us right at the beginning of the US Open, in which he would be defeated by Thomas Johanson in his 2nd round match, Gaudio comes back over his fabulous two weeks there and relates the highlights of his career, which had begun after his father’s life had been threatened by a heart attack when he was 15. He also points out his ambitions, on top of which he puts a victory in Davis Cup. Yes indeed, the French Open winner, that’s him, Gaston Gaudio!

Tennis Magazine: The US Open is about to begin but Argentina can’t still come over its 2 gold medals in the Olympic Games, in soccer and in basketball. How have you lived those 2 historical victories?

Gaston Gaudio: In front of my tv screen here in the US. And I was undoubtedly as excited about it as the whole country. I was happy for them as much as for me, you know I’m Argentinean so (smile). Watching them defeat the American “dream team” in semi, it was how can I say...unbelievable! Maybe you don’t know this but Argentina had not won any single olympic medal for 52 years. So the whole country went into the streets to celebrate it. A few weeks before the beginning of the Olympic Games, people were speculating a lot about which sport would bring medals and tennis was thought to be the one which could bring gold. But unfortunately Coria, Nalbandian and me have been forced to withdraw because of serious injuries. Good thing that others have contributed to help forget about the disappointment we had caused.(smile)

TM: How did your country live and welcome your triumph in Roland Garros?

GG: It’s been incredible.When I arrived at the airport in BA there were hundreds of people waiting for me. But the only ones I wanted to see were my family and girlfriend. I had not seen them for 2 months. Anyway I took part to a press conference before attending to a bunch of tv shows on the following day. And then I said stop, after 48 hours. It was too much for me. I withdrew at home, doing nothing at all- at least some party though- and I slept for a couple of days coz I was dead tired (smile).

TM: 3 months after your exploit, is it still so difficult for you to believe you’ve won RG?

GG: it is indeed (smile). But I’m getting used to the idea that I’ve actually won RG. You must know that I’ve always dreamt of winning in Paris since the very first day I touched a racket. I’ve anticipated the match point so much for all these years that living it for real has been like an earthquake for me. But now, when I come back home, I can see the trophy and touch it. My dream’s really become true (smile).

TM: And where is it?

GG: In my bedroom where I’ve also hanged up a photograph of me kissing it, an incredible moment. I’ve wanted to keep it as close to me as possible. RG was the dream of my life. At night, when I go to bed and when I watch the trophy, I can still feel happiness all through my body.

TM: During the press conference after the final you had wondered if your life would change. What is your answer to this question 3 months later?

GG: It hasn’t changed. Actually, I’m very often asked about this since RG. But there had been no upheaval in my life, except that people recognize me more often in the streets in BA. Apart from that, I keep on seeing the same people, with the same rythm of life. All that is related to my private life has remained unchanged. And on the circuit, though I’m more sollicited now, it is still very reasonable.

TM: Have you had the opportunity so far to watch this incredible final against Coria?

GG:I haven’t seen the whole match, only a few parts, the last 2 sets mostly. Actually the nicest parts (smile).

TM: When you watched your final what struck you most?

GG: How I saved the 2 match balls. Watching those 2 points, quietly sitting on my sofa, made me almost feel every single emotion running through my body at that time. And I really wonder how I didn’t make any fault. I’m not saying it was a matter of life and death, but I think it would have been too tough for me if I had not won those 2 points. Yeah, it would have been real tough. No, how I put the ball in in spite of all the tension I was feeling, it’s a real mystery.

TM: The final had begun like a nightmare for you. You were led by 6/0 5/1. There was only one man on the Center Court: Guillermo Coria.

GG: I was so nervous at the beginning of the match. Even before in the lockerrooms. I had withdrawn there with a friend of mine and John McEnroe passed by. I turned to him and asked if it was normal to be so tense when you play a Grand Slam final. He answered me “think of those who went to Irak and compare their restlessness to yours”. He repeated I was not there to suffer but to make the most of the moment, of this unique opportunity.It comforted me for a few minutes but when I got onto the court my anguish came back. And I played the first 2 sets the way I did. It was surely the worst tennis I had shown since the beginning of the tournament. But as time passed by and as I won some games, I managed to relax, whereas he who seemed to be so self assured during the first part of the final got tense too. It was as if restlessness had crossed the court.

TM: In the 3rd set, there has been a very important moment in the final. You won a spectacular point after a very long fight, which created a sort of contact between you and the public. They did the wave, you applauded...

GG: I needed some help (smile). So when they did the wave, I told myself that they were yet having fun with me. I remembered what JMcEnroe told me. I had to enjoy the time I was living. I had dreamt to be there. It shouldn’t be a nightmare. All I had to do was to play my tennis, take this match as I should do, as a game and not as a pain.

TM: In the 4th set, Coria has suffered cramps. Playing against somebody who has physically turned low is never easy. How have you lived this dramatic situation?

GG:I had already experienced this situation with him in Hamburg, it was last year. It had really upset me in Hamburg and I lost the match. This time I vowed to myself that the outcome would be totally different. I didn’t want to let myself distract one more time. But it was hard to deal with coz he simply couldn’t run anymore. I tried not to have too much look at him between the points. I focused on me and on the ball. My one and only goal was to hit it to the other side of the court.

TM: In such dramatic circumstances is it possible to feel some pity for one’s opponent?

GG: Pity, no! That’s how the game works. In tennis you have to be physically and mentally ready to win such a tournament.

TM: People have much talked about your smiles, even your laughs at the most dramatic times, when it sounded quite impossible to decide between you and Guillermo. What was on your mind at that time?

GG: As I’ve already said before, I was like in a movie. I had a look at Franco Davin, my coach, and asked him what’s happening to us? The way the whole match turned out was totally crazy.

TM: As you’ve already said, winning RG was the dream of your life. Could you describe us the very moment, the couple of seconds when delivrance breaks out?

GG: I immediately felt like sharing my happiness with the crowd, like kissing them. And that’s why I ran all around the court, clapping their hands. I can’t explain such a moment, except that it was incredible. That’s very quick but that’s all. It was the achievement of my work, of my suffering and the one of my family as well which had fought so hard on my side so that I can make my dream come true.

TM: And then, Guillermo Vilas and John MacEnroe gave you the trophy...

GG: (loudly) And it made the greatest picture of the world (smile). When I’m old and watch that pic of me between Vilas and MacEnroe, I’m sure I’ll feel the same shivers running all through my body as I’m feeling now. That’s a picture for my kids. No doubt they will be proud of me.

TM: Though you're a very good player on clay, it was hard to picture you in winning RG. What were your ambitions when you came in Paris?

GG: I've had a very awful beginning in the season. I was not playing good tennis, though Franco and me had made a very big preparation in San Juan at the end of 2003. I had lost all self-confidence. And then it all came back when we arrived in Europe for the clay season. But it was not the level I wanted to reach yet. In Barcelona, I turned the corner when I beat Moya, and when I played and lost the final against Robredo in 5 sets. And all got worse again in Rome and Hamburg because of the balls chosen by the ATP. I had totally lost my timing. Fortunately those in Düsseldorf and Paris have suited me much better. I also would like to say that I was really fearing the draw. I told Franco: I want to play somebody I don't know personally in the first round. Because I'm a sensible guy and because I've enough to do with my emotions as a player, so I don't need to add more!(smile) And I fell on Canas, another Argentinean. This match may have been the key. I won it in 5 sets but I could also have lost it the same way.

TM: But what were your ambitions right at the beginning of the tournament?

GG: Reaching the 2nd week

TM: From which moment did you tell yourself I can win RG?

GG: When I defeated Hewitt in the quarterfinal. We had played each other in Düsseldorf the week before and the match had been very tight. But on that day, I felt like I could spoil nothing. In the semis, we were only 4 left and none of us had ever won a Grand slam before. So I told myself I was equal to the others. That's what I kept on repeating Franco.

TM: You've just told us about your emotions when you played another Argentinean on the first round. But you also played two others in your last matches, David Nalbandian and Guillermo Coria. Was it as upsetting as it'd been against Canas?

GG: It was nothing comparable. Playing an Argentinean in the 1st round was frustrating, it was total lack of luck. But in the semis and in the final you feel like you've already achieved something. It has nothing to do with losing in the 1st round after all the sacrifices you've made during the previous weeks.

TM: You were unseeded for this RG, and in all your career you had never reached a Grand Slam quarterfinal. You were dreaming about winning a GS but did you think it could happen?

GG: No, absolutely not. As I've already said before, I've always lacked self-confidence and I didn't think I could achieve such an exploit. As the last rounds were getting closer I was not really thinking about a victory. I was even a bit negative as I was longing for the the tournament to end. I was so much tired (smile). It was too much for me. Relaxing had become impossible even on the days I wasn't playing. My legs were aching because I was tired but my head ached too because I couldn't stop thinking.

TM: When you were a kid RG was the tournament you were dreaming upon. What's the tv recollection which has struck your memory?

GG: The match between Chang and Lendl when Chand served underarm. And I've also watched a bunch of finals, but this match between Chang and Lendl remains on top of all.

TM: Do you feel like going back to RG in november when you come back in Paris for Berçy...

GG: I hadn't thought about it but I'd like to check if my name's written on top of Court n°1 (smile). So why not? I really would like to say how much I love this place and this tournament. For me it's the greatest one of all and winning it is so incredible! During all those years, I had put such a pressure on my shoulders that I had never been able to play my best tennis there. It had happened only once in 2002 but I had been unlucky to play Ferero who defeated me in 5 sets though I had broken him in the last set. All the rest had been disappointments, one after another.

TM: You've said you've always lacked self-confidence so far. In Paris you had even told about your work with a psychologist. What kind of collaboration is it?

GG: When I was younger, and it's still quite true today, I couldn't believe in me. This psychologist has helped me to open myself more, to appreciate more my pleasure on the court. I've very often felt what I was doing as a kind of pain. It's a long work I'm doing on myself and that I keep on doing. He's used to trip along with me sometimes. Otherwise I call him on the phone to review the situation. We've been working together for 1 year and a half now.

TM: Did you have, in your career, a moment more difficult than the others, a moment when the pain you've told us about before was simply unbearable?

GG: I did and it'not very far (smile). It was last year. It started with the DC semi Argentine played against Spain in september. I played an awful match against Moya. I just didn't feel like fighting on the court. In DC !It was awful. The media brought me down in Argentina. Of course! I just could not play during the following months. Tennis was not my interest anymore and I went on traveling though all I wanted was to stay at home. It all lasted for 3 months. I remember that when I played in St Petersbourg, Madrid and Berçy, it had been without any single ambition. I didn't care about losing. Only my body was on the court. But my mind was far away.

TM: How did you go out of this so dark period?

GG: I talked much with the psychologist I told you about. And I went back to training. At the end of last year, I even trained so much harder as I had ever done before.

TM: Your family plays a huge part in your player's life. And especially your father...

GG: When I was 15, he had a heart attack and seing him so close to death has been such a shock for me. At that time, I didn't know I wanted to devote my life to tennis. What happened to him acted like a revelator. I had to do something with my life and I knew he was dreaming of me as a tennis pro. So I got involved in this career for him. It was a kind of my tribute to him.

TM: And how is he doing now?

GG: Everything's allright. But all this is so far...

TM: How was your life when you were a child?

GG: My father has given me everything he could to help me get to where I am today and that's why I consider tennis so seriously. My parents have bled themselves white for my passion.

TM: Unlike Coria or Nalbandian it seems that your federation hasn't really helped you when you were younger.

GG: They haven't done anything. They only got interested in me when I was 18. I owe them nothing. So I have no reason to thank them for anything. The only thing I'm related to is for DC.

TM: How have you sorted it out, I mean financially, when you were younger?

GG: My parents have borne a lot. But sometimes I had no money to travel. Like others it happened that I had to cancel some trips because of that. My grandparents have also helped me a lot on different occasions.

TM: Concerning DC, by the way, how important is this competition for you?

GG: It is very important. It's even the 2nd biggest goal in my career. My 1st dream was to win RG. Davis Cup is my 2nd. And I'm sure we can win it with the players we have now.

TM: Which kind of DC player are you?

GG: Apart from the semi between Argentina and Spain we've talked about before, I've always had good results in this competition. I played 15 matches and only lost 2. I even had never been defeated in front of my folks. I'm not used to feel particularly anguished when I play for my country. And that's the main reason I had been chosen to play against Spain (smile).

TM: What's the atmosphere like in the team?

GG: It's been 1 year since I have played in DC for the last time. At that time it was really cheerful with my friends Zabaleta, Calleri, Chela and Arnold. I don't think it is still the case today. There had been some trouble recently. The captain's changed and it all happened very confusedly. But I repeat, we can win this DC, whatever the surface is. We can achieve what Vilas and Clerc have not been able to achieve. Everybody knows that the economic situation in Argentina is not very good. And sport is one of the only things that can make people happy. Winning the DC would be a sizeable event.

TM: But is tennis really popular in Argentina?

GG: Compared to soccer, it has of course nothing to do with it. But it comes 2nd, right after it.

TM: And Guillermo Vilas, as you told us about him, has he represented for you, as for Coria, somebody important?

GG: He's been the reference for all Argentinean players. And he has helped me a lot. I have trained for 2 years in his club in Buenos Aires. Then he has travelled a lot and we have quite lost contact. But each time he came back to Argentina, we talked about my game, my results. And we still do so today. I really thank him for all he's done for me so far.

TM: When you were a kid, was there any player you admired?

GG: I liked Becker, but Vilas, he was my idol. Tennis didn't exist in Argentina before him. It has developed thanks to him. I would never have won RG if he hadn't been the champion he was.

TM: And what about you? Have you turned into an idol?

GG: Not at all! (laughs). In Argentina we have only 2 idols, Maradona and Vilas. I will never be as famous as they are. I'm very far from it.

TM: To conclude, you're known to be an introverted person. Is there a hobby which helps you to relax?

GG: I'm playing golf. It's a real passion. I got a handicap of 13-14. I can forget everything on a green.

*Ljubica*
11-21-2004, 02:25 PM
Thanks for all the interviews guys. :)

Action Jackson
11-21-2004, 02:28 PM
It's a very detailed interview and it shows a lot of Gaston as himself.

Choupi
11-21-2004, 02:32 PM
Hey GWH you've been quicker than me! :eek:

I was on the edge of posting it here when I saw you had already done the job! :rolleyes:

Well I just hope that the opportunity to read it here won't stop the others from visiting our site anyway!!!!!!! Coz Ataxie and me spend a lot of time and passion running it so..... :aplot: Please keep coming and supporting us!!!!! :p

Action Jackson
11-21-2004, 02:35 PM
It's fine Choupi it's a good cause.

Choupi
11-21-2004, 02:45 PM
It definitely is!!!!!!! ;)

ataxie
11-21-2004, 03:34 PM
Hey Choupi , you see , your traduction has a lot of sucess!!!!!!!! :worship:

Choupi
11-21-2004, 03:43 PM
Now I know it was worth spending so much time and energy doing it!!!!!! ;)

Action Jackson
11-21-2004, 04:09 PM
I mean might clean up a few words, but it was a great translation, it's not easy to do for sure.

reiko
11-21-2004, 06:10 PM
Choupi, thank you for the interview translation! Great job!
Btw, I should have thanked you earlier when you translated the article back in October; but I was in Japan without internet at that time and right after coming back from Japan I went on to Bercy..... That's my excuse for much belated "thank you".

Choupi
11-21-2004, 06:13 PM
Hey Reiko no pb! Better late than never! Haha!!!! ;)

Seriously I'm glad you've liked my job! :D

User id 7816
11-21-2004, 10:30 PM
thanx so much for translating that loong TM interview Choupi!!! :worship: great job

taysbest
11-22-2004, 12:45 PM
Great Job Choupi! Thanks for doing that!!

aiwen_mei
11-22-2004, 03:43 PM
Hello! Choupi & ataxie, I really appreciate your translation & your fantastic website for GG. Actually, I visit almost every day and do enjoy it. :wavey:

Choupi
11-22-2004, 04:33 PM
:wavey: Hi Aiwen_mei!

Big thanks for your congrats! :p

Well Ataxie and I spend a lot of time and energy in running it and we do hope that all those, like you!, who come and have a look at our site make the decision to come back. We're doing and giving our best to satisfy our everyday visitors. And we do wish that you will keep on coming to meet us for a long long time still! :D

:wavey:

ataxie
11-22-2004, 05:47 PM
:wavey: Thank U a lot for the congrats!!!! It just proves us that it's worth doing so , we'll continue :-) :)

taysbest
11-22-2004, 06:35 PM
Ataxie and Choupi-
You are doing a great job on your site. I just love what you have done- really great work! You both should be proud!
I'll keep visiting for sure-

*Ljubica*
11-22-2004, 06:39 PM
Ataxie and Choupi-
You are doing a great job on your site. I just love what you have done- really great work! You both should be proud!
I'll keep visiting for sure-


Yes - I agree :worship: I have already mentioned it to Choupi - but I'll say it again!! I really do like what you are both doing over there - congrats :worship:

Choupi
11-22-2004, 07:41 PM
:rolleyes: :smooch: :hug: :kiss: :yeah:

taysbest
11-23-2004, 12:40 PM
this was in Clarin- it might already be posted somewhere- sorry if it is.

"In a stop in its vacations, Gastón Gaudio will face east Friday 22 to the premises Nicholas Massú in an exhibition in the exclusive Balthus club, in Vitacura, Santiago. There also there will be a parade of models."

Adri
11-24-2004, 02:25 AM
I've visited Ataxie's & Choupi's website and I too have to say it's awesome! Keep up the good work, guys! :D

Choupi
11-24-2004, 08:50 AM
Thanks Adri! :kiss: :smooch:


And don't worry about that, we'll keep on doing the good job! It's a good cause after all! ;) And seeing that you're so many to come and visit the site encourages us to stick to our task!
:yeah:

nenadeSergio
11-24-2004, 10:58 AM
Yeah, the site is awesome! I´m so glad to be one of the first peeps to come there. :)

Vale
11-24-2004, 03:24 PM
Choupi: I posted the link to your translation and the GG French site on the gastongaudiogroup forum in Spanish, and I want to tell you that they're thrilled with the interview, as I am too. Thanks a million!

Choupi
11-24-2004, 03:48 PM
Hey Vale, does it mean I'm becoming really international? hehe! :D

Just hope they won't post congrats in Spanish coz I don't speak a d*** word of Spanish!!! ;)

Anyway thanks! :p

ataxie
11-24-2004, 04:30 PM
Thanks a lot everybody for the support!!!! :worship: :wavey:

Choupi , don't stress about the persons writing in Spanish , i'm here to help you :p

Vale
11-24-2004, 05:10 PM
Yes Choupi, you're getting famous... they've even posted part of your translation in the site! Some time ago there was a similar interview in our newspaper Clarín, but this one is even better.

Choupi
11-24-2004, 05:25 PM
Well done Vale! You've made me flush now!!!! ;) Forgive me but I'm not used to celebrity at all!!!!! ;) :rolleyes:

reiko
11-25-2004, 12:38 AM
Business as usual, again! :)

Before I leave for Japan in some hours from now, I thought I wanted to share this brief GG interview with you. It is from SMASH magazine (August 2004, Switzerland). I type the article (German) and did my best to translate it into English. Would be appreciated if someone could translate it properly or correct any mis-translation.



=== INTERVIEW ===

<Wie ich mich selbst sehe>
Ich bin ein sehr Ich-bezogener Mensch. Und manchmal kann ich ganz schon verruckt sein. Fur einen Tennisprofil ist dies eine gute Kombination...

<Was mich glucklich macht>
Am liebsten bin ich mit meinen besten Freunden unterwegs. Wir haben immer viel zu lachen.

<Mein liebster Dinnergast>
Ich wurde gerne einmal Michael Jordan kennen lernen. Ich bin sicher, er konnte mir sehr viele interessante Dinge erzahlen. Fur mich ist Jordan einer der ganz Grossen im Sportbusiness - ein echter Star eben.

<Meine Lieblingsmusik>
Ich hore am liebsten Songs von Jamiroquai.

<Mein Lieblingsbuch>
Mein Lieblingsautor ist Sydney Sheldon. Ich lese aber auch sehr gerne Bucher von Paulo Coelho.

<Was ich uberhaupt nicht mag>
Ich hasse die standige Herumreiserei. Ich bin uberhaupt nicht gerne lange Zeit weg von zu Hause. Zudem leide ich unter Flugangst.

<Meine Extravaganzen>
Ich habe mir bisher keinen Luxus geleistet. Vielleicht kaufe ich mir als Belohnung fur meinen French-Open-Sieg demnachst ein schones Haus.

<Mein grosster Traum>
Den habe ich mir gerade erfullt: Schon als junge habe ich davon getraumt, Roland Garros zu gewinnen. Nun ist dieser Traum uberraschend schnell Wirklichkeit geworden.

<Meine Zukunftsplane>
Ich sehe mich in zehn Jahren als Familienvater beim Golfspielen und beim Riverrafting.

8/2004 Smash p.49





=== TRANSLATION ===

<How I see myself>
I am a very egocentric person. And often I can be really crazy. For a tennis profession this is a good combination.

<What makes me happy>
I love to go out with my best friends. We always have a lot of fun..

<Favourite dinner guest>
I would like to meet Michael Jordan. I am sure he could tell me a lot of interesting stories. For me, Jordan really is one of the biggest in the sport business - a real star.

<Favorite music>
I like Jamiroquai.

<Favorite book>
My favorite author is Sydney Sheldon. I also like Paulo Coelho.

<What I do not like at all>
I hate to be constantly on the road. In general I don’t like to be away from home for a long time. Moreover I have a fear of flying.

<My extravagance>
Until now I did not permit myself any luxury. Maybe I buy myself a beautiful house as a reward for my FO victory.

<Biggest dream>
I already fulfilled it. As a young boy I was dreaming of winning RG. This dream came true surprisingly early.

<Future plans>
I see myself in ten years as a family father playing golf and doing river-rafting.

8/2004 Smash p. 49

*Ljubica*
11-25-2004, 06:08 AM
Thanks Reiko - have a safe journey and have fun in Japan :wavey:

Choupi
11-25-2004, 09:35 AM
Hey Reiko thanks for your translation!

It was pretty good. Congrats! but there's just one little detail I want to correct. You translated "Ich-bezogener" by "egocentric" but in fact "introverted" would have suit better I think. ;)

Anyway big thx for your job!

taysbest
11-26-2004, 03:01 PM
Thanks so much for posting this Reiko! Have a safe trip.

sigmagirl91
11-26-2004, 04:57 PM
Good morning, all. Reiko, thanks for the article.

Action Jackson
11-27-2004, 02:30 AM
Thanks for the interview Reiko.