How does *your* Tennis Federation help Youngsters? [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

How does *your* Tennis Federation help Youngsters?

Stensland
08-01-2008, 12:14 PM
there has been a lot of talk about this subject over the years in germany: what does the federation offer? in what way can it help? how does it implement new methods, new tactics, new ways of "counseling" upcoming talents?

whenever the french open are on commentators keep telling us the french federation is probably among the best in the world, setting up bases around the country (?) and scouting talents very early. maybe some french mtf'ers can tell us more about it.

on the other hand we have the german federation that doesn't get shit done, to be honest. if you wanna make it in tennis, you have to do it yourself basically. find private sponsors and do whatever you can to come up with the basic needs. oh, and don't forget to hope and pray. at least this is what i usually hear. feel free to correct me if i'm wrong.

what does your countries' federation do to get juniors going? does it do anything at all? what can be done, what approach is the best in the long term?

Action Jackson
08-01-2008, 12:27 PM
Argentina they do nothing.

Spain have a lot of Futures and Challengers throughout the country, plus a very strong club competition. If players can survive that tough learning curve, then they will make it out.

The Aussies are soft, great weather, good facilities, but ultimately most can't make the jump from top junior to top pro.

Pfloyd
08-01-2008, 12:37 PM
My country(s) (I'm like the UN, 3 passports and all):

Well Spain does a great job, Like PMK explained.

The Dominican Republic does Jack shit to promote any athlete at all.

The United States has good programs for youngsters, but it hasn't produced a good talented player in years.

Stensland
08-01-2008, 12:50 PM
what job does spain do? pmk talked about challengers and futures - well, every country has them. is there anything the federation does itself or do spanish top players usually get coached in private clubs, like the sanchez/casal thing in barcelona?

kohlschreiber's home base is some public/private partnership in munich where the bavarian federation cooperates with a private sponsor: http://www.btv.de/BTVToServe/abaxx-?$part=Tennisbase.index.menu

haas was pn his own and moved to america (with sponsors). i think kiefer was sponsored by the federation though because he was a great junior.

NinaNina19
08-01-2008, 12:51 PM
What does Canada do someone?

PiggyGotRoasted
08-01-2008, 01:06 PM
The lta does nothing, it says it does but infact it just spends a load of money on players who have no hope of making it.

Tutu
08-01-2008, 01:13 PM
Maybe if they gave a fuck about people who don't have enough money to pay all the expenses for tennis (bearing in mind that London is waaaay more expensive than anywhere else) I would be training right now instead of posting on a tennis forum. :o :(

PiggyGotRoasted
08-01-2008, 01:16 PM
Maybe if they gave a fuck about people who don't have enough money to pay all the expenses for tennis (bearing in mind that London is waaaay more expensive than anywhere else) I would be training right now instead of posting on a tennis forum. :o :(
+2

Action Jackson
08-01-2008, 01:16 PM
what job does spain do? pmk talked about challengers and futures - well, every country has them. is there anything the federation does itself or do spanish top players usually get coached in private clubs, like the sanchez/casal thing in barcelona?


There is nearly a Futures event every week of the year in Spain, they do have a lot of challengers as well. Not many bother with the junior circuit, they want to get on the proper tour and they fight it out in very tough conditions against tough competitors.

Yes, even Nadal played Futures events, so once they get their first point and the clubs work with the regional federations, as it used to be decentralised with the Catalans looking after their section, Valencia province and the like.

They used to move to Barcelona, to train and get better competition, but it's not as common now, some stay at home and train, with their programs being overseen by local coaches.

In other words the various federations work with the local clubs.

Stensland
08-01-2008, 01:19 PM
that's great. i see the tennis guys copied the football guys' approach. spain is one hell of a sports nation. tennis, football, handball, basketball...you name it.

Lunaris
08-01-2008, 01:36 PM
Maybe if they gave a fuck about people who don't have enough money to pay all the expenses for tennis (bearing in mind that London is waaaay more expensive than anywhere else) I would be training right now instead of posting on a tennis forum. :o :(
That's basically the main problem. Everyone criticises communist regime and all the shit, but there were things they did well. If you wanted to do a sport in a communist country you got everything you needed gratis. Ice Hockey players for example were given a complete set of equipment, the same counted for most sports so even the poor families could afford their children to do a sport.
Nowadays in democracy, if you want to do a sport but don't have money or contacts you are screwed. All the talent and potential is wasted.

miura
08-01-2008, 02:16 PM
In Norway, especially in the region I live, there is absolutely no recruiting, hence no harvesting of talent. There's a reason the best norwegian player is ranked 569th in the world. 98% of funding from the government goes to sports like soccer, handball or some other uninteresting sport. The small amount of money who comes to the tennis federation is densely focused in and around the capital's tennis clubs. I have not seen any promotions or recruitional tries whatsoever. The reason people pick up tennis here is probably by either having friends/family who play or some who follows atp/wta tennis and decide to try it out themselves. I'm always bringing friends who haven't tried tennis before down to the courts to make them hit some, and 95% love it and could actually consider taking it up. In comparison, 60% of the kids in primary school is recruited into the local soccer team. This has made soccer so dominant it's almost impossible to recruit and fund tennis. It's like a big monopoly. I'm dreaming of someday causing a tennis revolution here.

JustJames
08-01-2008, 02:46 PM
Well I will use the £250,000 the [British] LTA have just spent on employing Max Mossley to insure British tennis news is in the newspapers as a glowing character reference. The LTA focus all of their attentions on several 'high performance' centres across the country but little attention is given to the individual clubs - meaning that players need to have the money/means to get to such centres and pay the large fees once they are.

However the LTA do provide substantial loans and grants to individual clubs to build new courts. Usually outdoor carpet courts. So they are providing courts that promising juniors will never [well.. I will allow for 'once or twice] play an international tournament on in their entire careers and one that does little to help a young player improve their game [low bouncing and fast courts often result in poor technique].

The LTA has large & deep pockets yet very little up top.

Collective
08-01-2008, 02:48 PM
Mexican Tennis Federation? Nothing!

Rafalover15
08-01-2008, 03:51 PM
Maybe if they gave a fuck about people who don't have enough money to pay all the expenses for tennis (bearing in mind that London is waaaay more expensive than anywhere else) I would be training right now instead of posting on a tennis forum. :o :(

+3

The idiots it cost a fortune to pratice i can only afford like one session in two mouths

Bilbo
08-01-2008, 04:01 PM
Mexican Tennis Federation? Nothing!

i'm not even sure if people in your country wants to play tennis. hard to believe.

Sebby
08-01-2008, 04:02 PM
What does Canada do someone?

For all I know not much, nearly nothing in fact. Tennis on Ice don't exist yet ;)

booa
08-01-2008, 07:02 PM
In France most kids are enrolled in a sport "association" outside school because French schools don't offer any extra curricular activities. There are tennis associations (and other sports associations like football, basketball etc) in every town and it's not expensive because most facilities and coaches are financed by public money. So it's not extremely expensive to start playing tennis.

Then there are training centers set up by the federation at the local, regional (one in each region) and national (four) levels. And there are also head coaches at each level whose job (amongst other things) includes scouting young talents.
When kids start playing at the local level and have good results the headcoach offers them to enter the local training center.
Then if you get good results at the regional level you can enter a regional training center etc until the national level.
This system is not specific to tennis. Other sports have the same training system.
Kids in these centers go to regular middle/high schools but they have specific schedules (no holes in their schedules and no P.E class) so that they can train after school. Most of them are boarding students but boarding in French school is not expensive at all.
Once again almost everything is financed by public money and if your parents are poor you can get financial aid so there is no financial barrier to enter these training centers.

IMO this is a good system to develop good players ... but not top players because even though the facilities and coaching are quite good, they are not as good as what you can find in some private academies abroad.
The great thing about the system is that parents don't have to pay much but you also cannot choose your coaches etc ... The system is not flexible. Imagine if you cannot stand the training centre coaches or the other kids there ? well, you can leave the centre but then you will probably get less help from the federation, they will stop picking you for international competitions etc ... And what about late bloomers ?

Anyway it should be interesting to follow the evolution of French tennis now that private academies/structures (Lagardère) have popped up in France.

Stensland
08-02-2008, 12:44 AM
...Then there are training centers set up by the federation at the local, regional (one in each region) and national (four) levels. And there are also head coaches at each level whose job (amongst other things) includes scouting young talents.
When kids start playing at the local level and have good results the headcoach offers them to enter the local training center.
Then if you get good results at the regional level you can enter a regional training center etc until the national level.
This system is not specific to tennis. Other sports have the same training system.
Kids in these centers go to regular middle/high schools but they have specific schedules (no holes in their schedules and no P.E class) so that they can train after school. Most of them are boarding students but boarding in French school is not expensive at all.
Once again almost everything is financed by public money and if your parents are poor you can get financial aid so there is no financial barrier to enter these training centers.

IMO this is a good system to develop good players ... but not top players because even though the facilities and coaching are quite good, they are not as good as what you can find in some private academies abroad.


i don't think there is a better system out there. this is as good as it gets.

Stensland
12-27-2008, 07:52 AM
not exactly initiated by the federation, but the bavarian tennisbase has recently hired thomas högstedt (1-year-contract). he's supposed to help the guys practising in munich, like kohlschreiber, mayer and many youngsters. given that he already helped haas or kiefer, i don't think that's a bad move at all.

reggie1
12-27-2008, 02:11 PM
Tennis in England is a complete nightmare imo. Every Wimbledon our commentators scratch their heads as to why no Wimbledon champion? Well, the answer is plain and simple in my opinion, it takes Money to play tennis and a lot of it. Where I live, there there is one tennis court with no net, been like that for about 5 years. I have two children who were interested in taking up tennis after Wimbledon. In order to get access to a decent court, I had to join a gym at a family membership cost of £100.00 per month and then pay for tennis lessons on top of that which were £7.00 each per child. I rather naively, thought we could just join one of the LTA clubs but people who know tennis, just laughed at me and told me it was all so snotty and they would not accept my kids anyway because they were beginners.
Once my children did actually start playing tennis (10 kids to one teacher!) that was when the gap between "ordinary" kids like mine who were only playing one hour per week (it was all I could afford to be honest) and the wealthier kids whose parents could afford to pay for private lessons really started to show. Some of the kids in my children's group were playing 10 hours of tennis per week and god only knows how much this would have cost because a private lesson is £25 per hour. In the end my kids lost interest because they thought they weren't any good, we just couldn't keep up with the cost of keeping them "up there" with the kids that came from wealthier families. I know you could say this is the case with losts of Sports but Tennis is just so damned expensive, snotty and elitist in this country to start with. Perhaps it differs in certain regions I don't know? My kids only did tennis, they had to sacrifice their other activities in order to do tennis as it all got too expensive.
If we ever get a British Wimbledon Champion from a Council Estate it will be a cold day in hell!

Action Jackson
12-27-2008, 02:26 PM
The Aussies have appointed Felix Mantilla as a specialist coach for players to improve on clay.

They are going to use a facility in Barcelona, while they build up some more in Australia.

Jimnik
12-27-2008, 02:26 PM
The LTA "helps" by splashing out millions to John McEnroe, Brad Gilbert, Peter Lundgren and various other stars. Convinced that this will inspire the next generation.

The LTA does absoutely nothing to combat the real issues with British tennis. Poor education system, poor facilities, poor competition and non-existant opportunities for youngsters to play regularly throughout the year.

reggie1
12-27-2008, 02:34 PM
The LTA "helps" by splashing out millions to John McEnroe, Brad Gilbert, Peter Lundgren and various other stars. Convinced that this will inspire the next generation.

The LTA does absoutely nothing to combat the real issues with British tennis. Poor education system, poor facilities, poor competition and non-existant opportunities for youngsters to play regularly throughout the year.

You are right. Inspiring people to take up the sport is not an issue. It's such a great sport that I think most kids would enjoy it. It's the cost and the accessability that is the issue, the LTA casts it's net so narrowly by only making the sport accessible to kids of wealthier families. :confused:

Fired Up!
12-29-2008, 08:54 AM
I could have turned a decent pro if somebody had helped me out with tennis in my early years. Ok, the federation didn't have money back then, but I know they do now, but so what? They use it for themselves. :worship: There's this one girl where I train, her family is really poor so she can't afford training all the time, so she goes to one club one day, then to another to find someone to hit with. She is really, really good. I am proud I've taken a set off her once. :D

Edit: They don't even care about their own coaches so it's pretty understandable. For God's sake, their best coach, a woman in her 40s, keep cheating so that her kids win in tournaments. I was playing in a local tourney, and I lead 7-2 in the super TB vs her best kid, and she somehow appointed herself as the refferee. :rolleyes: I ended up winning 12-10, and I will never forget the look she gave me. :angel:

manuel84
12-29-2008, 09:17 AM
The situation here in my country is very, very poor. Tennis is miles and miles away from the popularity of basketball and boxing, and government subsidy for the development program is just a drop in the bucket.

reggie1
12-29-2008, 10:16 AM
It seems that in most countries unless you have a family with the substantial financial means needed and the burning will/desire to help you progress further, a career in tennis just not a possibility for most youngsters, regardless of how talented they may be :sad: