Article : Almost Famous: Vassallo Arguello deals with second-hand notoriety [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Article : Almost Famous: Vassallo Arguello deals with second-hand notoriety

Action Jackson
07-26-2008, 06:56 AM
Disclaimer : As there will be these kind of predictable comments, time to get them out of the way now.

Fixer, cheat, doper, Argie scum, mug, ban this prick from the game etc, should have most covered.

http://www.tennis.com/features/general/features.aspx?id=131902

Almost Famous: Vassallo Arguello deals with second-hand notoriety


As Nikolay Davydenko's opponent in the match that created a gambling scandal, Martin Vassallo Arguello was one of the sport's most repeated names last summer. But there's more to him than that one contest.

By Kamakshi Tandon


All it took was one obscure second-round match in Sopot to transform Nikolay Davydenko from an anonymous Top 5 player to the poster child of shady gambling in tennis. But amidst the furor, it was easy to forget the infamous contest featured not just one player, but two.

That other player was Martin Vassallo Arguello, who suddenly found his name appended to the media sensation that resulted when online betting exchange Betfair voided $7 million of wagers on the match because of odd betting patterns.

Overnight, Vassallo Arguello had joined the legion of the almost famous - those whose names are familiar enough to ring a bell, but not for an easily identified reason.

Before he became a supporting actor in the sport's biggest match-fixing drama, the 28-year-old Argentine's claim to fame had been reaching the fourth round of the French Open in 2006. With few other results of note and a modest career-high of No. 58, it's not surprising that he has been mostly in demand for relating his view of events that day. "Every time I do a press conference, this is coming back," Vassallo Arguello said at the Australian Open. "I'm not very happy about this, but I know that it's something that now is part of the conversation and we have to talk about this."

But while he may be reluctant to talk, Vassallo Arguello has plenty to say. Like Janko Tipsarevic, he is of the tour's more intellectually-engaged players, and has never been afraid to make a statement. After winning his third-round match at the French Open run two years ago, Vassallo Arguello dispensed with the obligatory camera-lens autograph and instead signed off with a quote from Che Guevera - "Towards victory, always."

But then, he has a habit of mixing politics with cameras. Vassallo Arguello and fellow pros Juan Pablo Guzman and Juan Pablo Brzezicki run a website called Segundo Saque (www.segundosaque.com) - Spanish for "second serve" - which features player video clips and interviews. Their lockerroom tape of Novak Djokovic imitating various players became a hit on YouTube after Djokovic did his impressions of Maria Sharapova and Rafael Nadal on Arthur Ashe stadium at the US Open.

What you won't find on the site are the amateur documentaries Vassallo Arguello occasionally films in his spare time. Tennis players never know what they might stumble on during their nomadic wanderings on the circuit - and so it was for Vassallo Arguello in April 2005, when he found himself playing a challenger in Rome as huge crowds were gathering at the Vatican to hear the identity of the next pope.

He set off for the scene, bringing along the new video camera Guzman had bought for him from Naples for their budding website. "I was there also to see what was going on and what was the decision, which way the church was going," Vassallo Arguello, who is a non-practicing Catholic, said in an interview with TENNIS.com last year. "I also watch the church as a political instrument, so there are many things I don't like about church - all churches, not just Catholic."

Camping out among the faithful and the curious, he got their thoughts on film. "Some had a lot of disappointment because many of them expected a South American pope, some of them expected an Italian pope," he recalled. "But in a political way it was easy to believe that the church was going to turn more conservative."

A year and a half later, Vassallo Arguello was training in Chile during the off-season when former dictator Augusto Pinochet died, massing large numbers of supporters and protesters. "When I know about Pinochet I went there, because I knew that was a moment to bring back a lot of emotion from people who suffered under Pinochet and wanted to be there, and the people who liked Pinochet and wanted to be there," said Vassallo Arguello.

Once again, he wandered around collecting people's thoughts, quite happy to be presumed a journalist if it made people more forthcoming.

It may all seem like an unusual hobby for a pro tennis player, but he doesn't see anything strange about pursuing his interests. "I think everybody is trying to take advantage of the things that they're interested in. For example, [David] Nalbandian is going all the time to rally races because he travels a lot and every time there is one, he goes... Some of them are going to parties," he said. "I was in some places where political things were happening and I like to see those."

His socialist bent stems from his family background and a youth spent in South America, buttressed by his experiences on the circuit.

"[My parents] work a lot for democracy to come back in Argentina, we had a military government in the 70s," he said. "And when came, it was a big party... I was going with them and I was sharing that atmosphere of democracy, politics. People were discussing it a lot and I grow up with that."

Despite the country's political transformation, Vassallo Arguello remained conscious that there remained a large gap between the rich and the poor. "Especially in South America, it is easy to see the differences. You go to the capital and you see a lot of money, and you don't have to travel too much to see the other side of the story. Maybe in places like Europe, it's not easy to see."

Vassallo Arguello found himself trying to breach a similar divide when he set out to try to make it on the circuit. It was the year 2000 and Argentine tennis was hitting the big time with players like Guillermo Coria, David Nalbandian, Gaston Gaudio and Guillermo Canas starting to make their presence felt in the upper reaches of tennis. Meanwhile, a group of their less illustrious compatriots were looking up from the lower ranks. "There were a lot of Argentine players starting to play so good. They were the 'big tennis' and the tennis we wanted to play," said Vassallo Arguello. "We were the 'poor tennis' people.

"We were playing futures and challengers... trying to get points and we could not do it, and the way we're traveling, we always enjoy a lot. It was a little adventure, you know, we were going to hotels and sleeping in chairs, we slept in military places. We were doing our best with not much money. And we were also enjoying [it], and we started to call that 'poor tennis.'"

As they traveled and played and scrimped together, they formed a modest goal: to get one of them into the top 100. In September 2003, Vassallo Arguello hit No. 101 for two tantalizing weeks, but then slid back. Eight months later, he broke the ceiling at No. 96, and was duly dubbed the representative of the working tennis poor. "I was the first one, so they started to call me the president," he said.


Vassallo Arguello's first extended stay in the Top 100 began about a year and a half ago, culminating in his career-high of No. 58 in April last year. Playing regularly in tour events was deeply vindicating. "I was looking at the door and now... I'm sharing lockerrooms with amazing players... I'm practicing with great players, so I'm starting to feel part of this, and that's amazing after so many years of working for it."

Being congratulated by the likes of Nalbandian and Argentine legend Guillermo Vilas after his French Open victories was a thrill, but he was even more satisfied when his colleagues stopped being as effusive.

"There are two kinds of congratulations, [a routine] one that you say in the locker room. 'Hey, well done.' And the [active] one they come to you and say, 'hey, congratulations for what you did' - in my case, because they know I am from another kind of tour, that I am a level behind them," he observed. "Now the congratulations is different from them. It's like, 'okay, congratulations.' Because they start to feel I am with them all the time andthey respect me a little bit more."

Vassallo Arguello's views on tennis politics are, not surprisingly populist. He is troubled the increasingly market-oriented direction of the tour and, like several of his higher-ranked colleagues, unhappy about the calendar changes being planned. Starting next year, Shanghai will become a Masters event in the fall and Madrid is scheduled to become a combined clay Masters in the spring. That means Monte Carlo and Hamburg will drop down in the pecking order, though Hamburg is disputing the decision in court.

"This president [ATP chief Etienne De Villiers] we have now is trying to make tennis more commercial," said Vassallo Arguello. "He is trying to put tennis on the market, with more money, and we are sold as a product.

"I don't know if it is going to work but I don't like if I'm going to receive a little more prize money [only] to be shut out and to say okay to everything.

"The worst thing is that they are not interested in that communication. It's not [acceptable] that Rafael Nadal didn't know anything about those changes
until they were done. He's No. 2 in the world and he's the clay guy. A lot of us should be consulted.

"You see that Europe is losing power and Europe has a lot of tradition and I don't like that very much... I like to watch Hamburg, I like to watch Monte Carlo and especially for me, the tournaments of clay are the ones I like most are starting to lose power and I don't like it."

He has been even more unhappy with some of the measures the ATP took in response to that notorious match against Sopot against Davydenko, branding them "the political terrorism of scaring you" in his native Spanish at the Australian Open.

Previous anti-corruption rules strictly forbade players from betting on tennis matches. New measures also require them to inform the ATP within 48 hours if they suspect anyone of being involved in match-fixing. "Now there's a new rule that you have to be constantly policing, and pushing away everyone that gets near you asking you something suspicious, or just how you're doing," he continued in Spanish. "There are a lot of things that are not clear or have little meaning."

He is happy, however, that the ATP mounted a proper investigation of the matter so the discussion could be based on more than just mere speculation. Speaking to reporters in English, he said he had not noticed anything unusual during the Davydenko match, learning about the circumstances only after an official informed him the next day.

The match had attracted an eye-catching $7 million worth of wagers on the online betting exchange Betfair and featured highly unusual betting patterns - the odds listed top seed Davydenko as an underdog going into the match and continued to do so even after he won the first set. When Davydenko retired in the third set with a foot injury, there was immediate speculation that the outcome had been known in advance. After some review, Betfair took the unprecedented step of voiding all bets placed on the contest.

In the months that followed, several players came forward to say they had been approached with offers to throw matches for money. Five Italian players - Alessio di Mauro, Daniele Bracciali, Potito Starace, Giorgio Galimberti and Federico Luzzi- have also receiving suspensions ranging from nine months to six weeks for betting small amounts on other players' matches over the past few years.

"I am a friend of them," said Vassallo Arguello. "I spoke to them after that... and the same thing I said to them I say to you - unfortunately, there is nothing to say against the ATP in that case.

"There is a rule that says that you cannot bet. And even if you bet $90 two years ago, there is a rule against that."

Nearly 10 months later, little has been proven about the Sopot match itself. Davydenko currently is in the midst of a dispute about handing over his family's phone records to investigators, arguing through his lawyer that his own records are enough and that the investigation is becoming too invasive.

Vassallo Arguello was also questioned by investigators about whether he had noticed anything during the match and asked for his own phone records, which he handed over.

But when bookmakers quietly began circulating a list of about 140 suspicious matches in which Vassallo Arguello featured multiple times, some different questions seemed to be in order.

"I heard about the list," he said. "At the end of the year, ESPN International came home to do an interview and they showed me that I was in, like, seven or eight matches. And I saw the matches and they were all matches that I was winning and then I lose, or matches that I was losing and then won. But as I said before, they said there are a list of 300 matches [with such scorelines], and I could say there is a list of 20,000 matches."

But there could be a more official line of questioning on the way for Vassallo Arguello. This week, the governing bodies of tennis received a report from investigators that ruled tennis was "not institutionally or systemically corrupt" but found 45 matches that required further scrutiny. It seems likely that the Argentine may have taken part in some of those.

While he waits to see whether he will be cast in a bigger role in this unfortunate saga, there's one thing he isn't doing - getting it all on film. Because his interviews with other players are usually on light-hearted topics, he's worried that their habitual humor might inadvertently land them in trouble.

"It's not easy" he said. "I prefer not to ask about that. I can ask you how you think you can beat Federer, and you tell me 'maybe kick him in a changeover.' But in corruption, if you make a joke like this it can be very dangerous."

zaboomafoo
07-26-2008, 07:06 AM
argies are known cheaters, im the only exception, but then again, im from argentina so please dont trust my words

on topic: im bored with all this beting news

Jelena
07-26-2008, 09:03 AM
one remark about the introduction: "....with a modest career high of 58" Has this journalist ever tried to become the 58th best tennisplayer worldwide? :smash:

The article itself is very interesting, thanks for posting it, though it's only old news about that special match. But what else should he say?

finishingmove
07-26-2008, 09:24 AM
i hope this fixing story ends before it turns into an authentic 17th century witch hunt.

give them a break, they're just trying to make a living

Merton
07-26-2008, 04:03 PM
Thanks for the article, very interesting read. I wish the press gave more room for stories about players not at the very top of the game.

Action Jackson
07-26-2008, 04:05 PM
Merton, well most people are gloryhunters and they aren't prepared to go outside the boundaries.

MVA has some very clear thoughts about the direction of the ATP as an organisation.

Not a surprise about the investigation being stalled.

Henry Chinaski
07-26-2008, 04:13 PM
good article. he's a modern day robin hood.

Merton
07-26-2008, 04:14 PM
Merton, well most people are gloryhunters and they aren't prepared to go outside the boundaries.

MVA has some very clear thoughts about the direction of the ATP as an organisation.

Not a surprise about the investigation being stalled.

The surprise would be if the investigation actually turned up the big fish, it is laughable that they punish players betting pennies on other matches. Still I am curious what they will announce, time for you to get a new name. :lol:

scoobs
07-26-2008, 04:17 PM
"This president [ATP chief Etienne De Villiers] we have now is trying to make tennis more commercial," said Vassallo Arguello. "He is trying to put tennis on the market, with more money, and we are sold as a product.

"I don't know if it is going to work but I don't like if I'm going to receive a little more prize money [only] to be shut out and to say okay to everything.

Well that's pretty much the nub of the issues with De Villiers isn't it - he's ramming things through without the necessary consultation and expect the players to wear it with a bit of extra prize money.

Action Jackson
07-26-2008, 04:21 PM
The surprise would be if the investigation actually turned up the big fish, it is laughable that they punish players betting pennies on other matches. Still I am curious what they will announce, time for you to get a new name. :lol:

Well, I might have to.

The site is very good, though for the most part it's in Spanish. Here is one of the player interviews that they do.

Brzezicki interviews Tipsarevic.
http://www.segundosaque.com/video/173/JANKO+TIPSAREVIC

scoobs
07-26-2008, 04:25 PM
It's time they brought it to a close one way or another - if they can't land anything else then just announce the investigation is over and all players in the "suspicious" matches are under no further suspicion of wrongdoing. And that obviously there is monitoring going forward to ensure that anything suspicious in future will be looked at carefully.

shotgun
07-26-2008, 04:26 PM
good article. he's a modern day robin hood.

:lol:

Deivid23
07-26-2008, 04:26 PM
It's time they brought it to a close one way or another - if they can't land anything else then just announce the investigation is over and all players in the "suspicious" matches are under no further suspicion of wrongdoing. And that obviously there is monitoring going forward to ensure that anything suspicious in future will be looked at carefully.


Naive thinking.

Jelena
07-26-2008, 04:28 PM
"This president [ATP chief Etienne De Villiers] we have now is trying to make tennis more commercial," said Vassallo Arguello. "He is trying to put tennis on the market, with more money, and we are sold as a product.

"I don't know if it is going to work but I don't like if I'm going to receive a little more prize money [only] to be shut out and to say okay to everything.

Well that's pretty much the nub of the issues with De Villiers isn't it - he's ramming things through without the necessary consultation and expect the players to wear it with a bit of extra prize money.
It's incredible to read that even Rafa didn't know anything before they established the changes.

I only HOPE that Mister Disney won't be elected again. :retard:

scoobs
07-26-2008, 04:30 PM
Naive thinking.
What's naive about it? Sooner or later they will have to decide nothing can be proved one way or the other on matches that happened a long time ago, and close the investigation - any evidence if there was wrongdoing is likely to have been long destroyed.

Seems like common sense to me :shrug: You say it's naive but don't explain why.

Deivid23
07-26-2008, 04:40 PM
What's naive about it? Sooner or later they will have to decide nothing can be proved one way or the other on matches that happened a long time ago, and close the investigation - any evidence if there was wrongdoing is likely to have been long destroyed.

Seems like common sense to me :shrug: You say it's naive but don't explain why.


Ok. Naive bc:

ATP can indeed land much more than it´s been published but they´re not interested in making it public, it takes less than 1 month of work to make a complete dossier about all suspicious matches and it´s been a year since that match happened. It´s pretty clear they don´t want to say one word.

They can´t close investigations about so many matches like if they didn´t happen without a punishment and say, ok, from now and on there will be punishment. They will justify their "work?" and will make it look as a good effort with those ridiculous banning to the Italians and a few more players

They will just let it stay like it is now, nothing interesting will be done in the end, at least nothing will be public

Merton
07-26-2008, 04:41 PM
Scoobs, who will do the monitoring? The problem is that it is quite possible that there are ATP insiders engaged in coordinating fixed matches. It has to be an independent watchdog but the betting markets are relatively small and fragmented to support that at this moment.

Action Jackson
07-26-2008, 04:45 PM
Scoobs, who will do the monitoring? The problem is that it is quite possible that there are ATP insiders engaged in coordinating fixed matches. It has to be an independent watchdog but the betting markets are relatively small and fragmented to support that at this moment.

You saw what happened when the ATP were responsible for the drug tests, before they let WADA take over. There have to be higher ups aka ATP officials or insiders that have been benefitting from this.

So the situation will be they will catch the random small fish, to make it look like something is happening, as we have seen already.

scoobs
07-26-2008, 04:49 PM
Ok. Naive bc:

ATP can indeed land much more than itīs been published but theyīre not interested in making it public, it takes less than 1 month of work to make a complete dossier about all suspicious matches and itīs been a year since that match happened. Itīs pretty clear they donīt want to say one word.

They canīt close investigations about so many matches like if they didnīt happen without a punishment and say, ok, from now and on there will be punishment. They will justify their "work?" and will make it look as a good effort with those ridiculous banning to the Italians and a few more players

They will just let it stay like it is now, nothing interesting will be done in the end, at least nothing will be public

If they have suspicions but no proof sooner or later they have to let it go and close the investigation. Or the investigation will stop and nothing more is said about it, but you know, they will be questioned about what's going on with it so it would be better if they just at some point said, we've done what we can investigating these.

Scoobs, who will do the monitoring? The problem is that it is quite possible that there are ATP insiders engaged in coordinating fixed matches. It has to be an independent watchdog but the betting markets are relatively small and fragmented to support that at this moment.

In my view, this is what they should do - an independent watchdog that suspicious matches can be reported to with investigative powers.

Won't happen though.

Merton
07-26-2008, 04:51 PM
You saw what happened when the ATP were responsible for the drug tests, before they let WADA take over. There have to be higher ups aka ATP officials or insiders that have been benefitting from this.

So the situation will be they will catch the random small fish, to make it look like something is happening, as we have seen already.

The mechanism is a bit different, for drug tests they are unlikely to hurt the stars since they produce revenues, and we saw how pathetic it was facing the same situation with Coria and Rusedski and taking different decisions. With gambling I guess they would love to blast PMK but they cannot, and it is quite possible that there are insiders benefiting from the whole thing.

Bottom line is the same, small fish is vulnerable, big fish is not.

Deivid23
07-26-2008, 04:53 PM
If they have suspicions but no proof sooner or later they have to let it go and close the investigation. Or the investigation will stop and nothing more is said about it, but you know, they will be questioned about what's going on with it so it would be better if they just at some point said, we've done what we can investigating these.



Wait and see. They will say sth like "We are doing everything in our hands, as a result you can see the 10-12 bannings we´ve punished a few players with and we´re still keeping our eyes on everything dodgy that arises concerning past and recent matches. No more time for questions, thanks"

bjurra
07-26-2008, 05:11 PM
The mechanism is a bit different, for drug tests they are unlikely to hurt the stars since they produce revenues, and we saw how pathetic it was facing the same situation with Coria and Rusedski and taking different decisions. With gambling I guess they would love to blast PMK but they cannot, and it is quite possible that there are insiders benefiting from the whole thing.

Bottom line is the same, small fish is vulnerable, big fish is not.

The ATP can't catch any fish, neither big nor small. (We shouldn't count catching players betting 5 euro as fish)

fast_clay
07-26-2008, 05:33 PM
i like this article... and its attempts to re-humanise Arguello...

i am with the others that say the ATP are just gonna leave this match to fester over a period of time... to fester, therefore it becomes more more a 'judgement through media'... some might argue that type of scarring is worse than any punishment handed out... a few $$$ might help ease the players souls tho...

fast_clay
07-26-2008, 06:00 PM
the vid with tipsarevic is pretty cool too...

Action Jackson
07-26-2008, 06:05 PM
the vid with tipsarevic is pretty cool too...

Most of the stuff they do is in Spanish, but with Vassallo Arguello, well he is flawed for sure.

His comments about the ATP are on the money, some would say a few of his matches were as well, depending on what side was taken. It will be interesting to see what happens with the Hamburg lawsuit.

Nathaliia
07-26-2008, 09:34 PM
it's a good read

thanks for posting

DhammaTiger
07-26-2008, 10:56 PM
I have liked Vassallo-Arguello for a long time. I saw him in Stuettgart 2004 in person. He seemed to be very nice fellow. He was practising a lot with Willy Canas. I have tons of his pictures and video practising. Good to know more about him from the article. He seems to be a very thoughtful man. At one point he was playing as an Italian. I remember at that tournament he was an Italian. Maybe I am wrong but isn't he Argentine-Italian?
Thank you very much for posting the article PMK.

ReturnWinner
07-26-2008, 11:02 PM
Maybe I am wrong but isn't he Argentine-Italian?


yes he is. He has both citizenships.

Henry Chinaski
07-27-2008, 05:41 AM
he plays as an Italian in Bundesliga. no idea whether his Italian citizenship was specifically related to that or not. obviously would help a lot with ease of tavel when playing in europe and stuff.

and it shouldn't be forgotten that the atp brushed this issue under the carpet for years and only launched an investigation when negative publicity forced their hand.

Action Jackson
07-27-2008, 05:44 AM
It was more because it was easier to base himself in Italy, where there were many challengers and also travelling around Europe was a lot easier.

Many Argentines travel on European passports, like Gaudio and Nalbandian use an Italian one. Hartfield uses an Austrian one and Brzezicki is Polish.

Dougie
07-27-2008, 10:35 AM
Very nice article, thanks for posting. He seems to be a smart guy, and itīs the first time I recall actually reading his thoughts about the famous match and the problem in general.

DhammaTiger
07-27-2008, 10:42 AM
It was more because it was easier to base himself in Italy, where there were many challengers and also travelling around Europe was a lot easier.

Many Argentines travel on European passports, like Gaudio and Nalbandian use an Italian one. Hartfield uses an Austrian one and Brzezicki is Polish.

yes he is. He has both citizenships.

he plays as an Italian in Bundesliga. no idea whether his Italian citizenship was specifically related to that or not. obviously would help a lot with ease of tavel when playing in europe and stuff.

and it shouldn't be forgotten that the atp brushed this issue under the carpet for years and only launched an investigation when negative publicity forced their hand.

I thought so too. Thank you all for clarifying it for me.

CooCooCachoo
07-27-2008, 12:32 PM
Very, very interesting read. I didn't know about his political engagement and it does shed a whole new light on him as a player.

As for the betting side, it's getting old.

Jaap
07-27-2008, 12:37 PM
Fixer.

End of thread.

dijus
07-27-2008, 06:46 PM
Fixer.

End of thread.

:yeah:

Action Jackson
07-27-2008, 09:11 PM
Fixer.

End of thread.

Forgot to read the disclaimer, second line in the OP says it all. Literacy isn't a strong point.

Disclaimer : As there will be these kind of predictable comments, time to get them out of the way now.

Fixer, cheat, doper, Argie scum, mug, ban this prick from the game etc, should have most covered

dijus
07-27-2008, 09:13 PM
Forgot to read the disclaimer, second line in the OP says it all. Literacy isn't a strong point.

Disclaimer : As there will be these kind of predictable comments, time to get them out of the way now.

Fixer, cheat, doper, Argie scum, mug, ban this prick from the game etc, should have most covered

mate, don't tell me you believe MVA is innocent? :o

Action Jackson
07-27-2008, 09:22 PM
mate, don't tell me you believe MVA is innocent? :o

It actually doesn't matter whether I believe him or not.

One considering the article presents his own words which hasn't been said, while Davydenko had been interviewed consistently, and it's not just one person involved.

The majority of people in this thread have been able to discuss different matters that were raised in here, not the ones just concerning betting, there are other problems in the game of tennis that were raised as well.

Hence my disclaimer said it all, get all the crap out at the start. So no need to repeat it again.

bad gambler
07-28-2008, 12:33 AM
I already have formed my opinion of MVA a long time ago but an interesting read nonetheless.

Deivid23
07-28-2008, 05:23 AM
It actually doesn't matter whether I believe him or not.

One considering the article presents his own words which hasn't been said, while Davydenko had been interviewed consistently, and it's not just one person involved.

The majority of people in this thread have been able to discuss different matters that were raised in here, not the ones just concerning betting, there are other problems in the game of tennis that were raised as well.

Hence my disclaimer said it all, get all the crap out at the start. So no need to repeat it again.


Apart from his interest about politics and a few other things which I might understand some posters might find interesting (not my case, but this doesn´t matter at all) I struggle to see how people can find his comments about ATP interesting and even take some conclusions out of the mouth of a guy that is lying most of the time about everything related to it. When he criticizes it, he doesn´t do it as heavily as he really thinks (bc he knows he can´t speak too loud as he knows he´s guilty of charge), when he´s asked about the betting scandal, he just say "oh, well, I didn´t know shit about anything, but there are not 300 matches in that list, there should be 20.000". Shame on him

finishingmove
07-28-2008, 05:27 AM
i think what he was trying to say is that there are numerous tennis match examples like those 'suspicious' matches, where one player is losing then turns it over...

Deivid23
07-28-2008, 05:28 AM
i think what he was trying to say is that there are numerous tennis match examples like those 'suspicious' matches, where one player is losing then turns it over...

Yup, my bad, anyway, the fact that heīs lying in everything concerning that still stands

Action Jackson
07-28-2008, 08:07 AM
Apart from his interest about politics and a few other things which I might understand some posters might find interesting (not my case, but this doesnīt matter at all) I struggle to see how people can find his comments about ATP interesting and even take some conclusions out of the mouth of a guy that is lying most of the time about everything related to it. When he criticizes it, he doesnīt do it as heavily as he really thinks (bc he knows he canīt speak too loud as he knows heīs guilty of charge), when heīs asked about the betting scandal, he just say "oh, well, I didnīt know shit about anything, but there are not 300 matches in that list, there should be 20.000". Shame on him

There are enough points of interests, that aren't related to the betting scandal for it to be posted. What, that Nadal hadn't been informed of the prospective changes by the ATP and he is one of the main guys, the fact they (ATP) are solely interested in commercial gain and for the benefit of the tournament directors at the expense of the players. That is common knowledge and a fair point, even if it comes from suspect quarters.

Do you really expect him to admit any form of guilt, even the article states and it's well known that there certain matches, that he was involved in that are being looked at. The problem is what, you and I know, plus what Henry stated earlier in this thread. The problem has been going on for a very long time, but we know what will come of it.

Of course you are entitled to your own view, that he is a liar, fake, contradictory character and that's cool.