I hate this man [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

I hate this man

luvbadboys
08-29-2002, 08:01 AM
Please e-mail cnnsi and complain to that s** of a b**** about his xenophobic, negative article. Explain to him that when the casual observer reads shit like this it is not likely to entice the person to watch men's tennis. If his goal is to destroy men's tennis in the US then that was a successful first step. Bastard:fiery:

Article by
Frank Deford
cnnsi.com

The male American Dream, athletic division, is now this: Every little boy hopes to grow up to become a good enough player to someday be celebrated with his own bobblehead doll.

Certainly, we know, too, that the best young male American athletes are not concentrating on tennis anymore. The U.S. Open, which is now the richest sports event in the world, opened this week with only four homegrown men among the 32 seeded players. It was not that long ago that half of all male tournament players were from the United States, but as tennis has become more and more international, American representation has dropped off precipitously.

The American presence in men's tennis is actually even more diminished than it seems, because two of the four seeded U.S. players are Andre Agassi and Pete Sampras, both of whom are over 30 -- dotage, in a physically demanding sport where players rarely compete past their 20s. Poor Sampras seems to have aged overnight. Until very recently everybody kept asking whether he would ever win another tournament. Sadly, now, with every tournament he enters, it's problematic that he'll even win a match.

Agassi's decline has not been quite so dramatic, but he is clearly not the commanding force he was only a couple of years ago, and it seems only a short while before he bows out and joins his wife, Steffi Graf, in a contented life of parenthood and desert leisure.

This leaves U.S. men's tennis in the hands of the 25th-seeded James Blake and, most particularly, with Andy Roddick. The 11th-seeded Roddick will celebrate his 20th birthday this Friday, and, is, incredibly, the only serious American championship hope for the immediate future -- this from a country that has rarely failed to have at least one player at the top of the tree. Indeed, except for the 1960s, the United States has produced a great male tennis champion in every decade of the 20th century.

Moreover, starting before World War I with Maurice McLoughlin , who was known as the California Comet, almost all of the top Americans were, like Sampras, great servers. The Comet, Bill Tilden, Ellsworth Vines, Don Budge, Jack Kramer, Pancho Gonzales, Tony Trabert, Arthur Ashe and John McEnroe all had offensive games where the serve was paramount, where attacking the net was the purpose. Only Jimmy Connors didn't fit that mold, and he was certainly aggressive enough after his own fashion. So, too, did the great Australians play serve-and-volley when they ruled tennis.

Now, though, as the Europeans have taken control of men's tennis, the game has begun to mimic their favorite team sport. Tennis has been soccer-ized. Tennis now is played almost entirely from the baseline, side-to-side rather than up and out. The slashing, advancing style always favored by the best Americans -- analogous to the home run, the fast break, the long pass -- has been superceded by the more patient, wearing Euro-soccer style. The large, kryptonite rackets allow players to hit harder than ever, but it's not a vigorous, exciting, advancing power. Tennis used to be cavalry. Sound the bugle! Now it's artillery. Mark the coordinates.

Curious as it may be for this nation of immigrants, we Americans have never cottoned to foreign athletes. Now that men's tennis is not only dominated by non-Americans, but also played in an un-American style, you have to wonder how long the U.S. Open -- and the game itself -- can sustain popularity here.

Mrs. B
08-29-2002, 12:21 PM
What is he talking about? What is un-American style? Tennis started in England, which is part of the European continent, for crying out loud. He seems to find it hard to accept that tennis nowadays has been dominated by Europeans, or South Americans, what's wrong with that? This is a very popular sport all over the planet, it just so happens that right now there are other better players than the Amis. And btw, Hewitt, a non European, is the current the top player.

Murkofan
08-29-2002, 04:49 PM
Originally posted by luvbadboys


Now, though, as the Europeans have taken control of men's tennis, the game has begun to mimic their favorite team sport. Tennis has been soccer-ized. Tennis now is played almost entirely from the baseline, side-to-side rather than up and out. The slashing, advancing style always favored by the best Americans -- analogous to the home run, the fast break, the long pass -- has been superceded by the more patient, wearing Euro-soccer style. The large, kryptonite rackets allow players to hit harder than ever, but it's not a vigorous, exciting, advancing power. Tennis used to be cavalry. Sound the bugle! Now it's artillery. Mark the coordinates.

Curious as it may be for this nation of immigrants, we Americans have never cottoned to foreign athletes. Now that men's tennis is not only dominated by non-Americans, but also played in an un-American style, you have to wonder how long the U.S. Open -- and the game itself -- can sustain popularity here.

How stupid. It's not as though all the few top American guys play serve and volley. :rolleyes:

And maybe, just maybe, more Americans would cotton on the more foreign athletes if, I don't know, they got some coverage every once in a while? :rolleyes: Just a thought.

Vera
08-29-2002, 05:09 PM
Originally posted by Mrs. B
What is he talking about? What is un-American style? Tennis started in England, which is part of the European continent, for crying out loud. He seems to find it hard to accept that tennis nowadays has been dominated by Europeans, or South Americans, what's wrong with that? This is a very popular sport all over the planet, it just so happens that right now there are other better players than the Amis. And btw, Hewitt, a non European, is the current the top player.

Exactly. If you have to claim it, tennis is European sports at the very least. But I think it definitely is a world sports. Is he thinking that if Americans can't dominate in this sports, they might as well abandon it? How ignorance! To be honest, even if no Americans in Top 10, the game is still very interesting, and certainly the worldwide fan base wouldn't complain.

TheBoiledEgg
08-29-2002, 05:40 PM
what an idiot, a typical US writer talking and writing crap

The Crow
08-29-2002, 05:56 PM
OMG is he for real? :eek: lmao

itsallgood
08-29-2002, 07:03 PM
Well, in response to this article I have a couple of things to say :-

:eek: what a twonk - the first thing he should is get his facts right........:mad:

This guy seems to have forgotten about players who more recently held the Number 1 spot and to an extent dominated the mens game - the likes of :

:bounce: BJORN BORG - hardly what I would call a serve volleyer, not truly even an agressive player.

:bounce: IVAN LENDL - an amazingly fit and driven human being who was an out and out counter-puncher working almost exclusively from the baseline.

:bounce: MICHAEL CHANG - also held the number one spot for a while and yep - you guessed it ..... from the baseline!!!!

:bounce: THOMAS MUSTER - virtually unbeatable on anything other than grass ------ guess where he played the game from ......lol ..... uh huh, the baseline!!!

This guy seems to have forgotten about these guys and the real truth of this matter is this :

Tennis has always been made interesting by the variety of styles that are in evidence at the big events - the true GRAND SLAM has not been acheived by any one player since before the OPEN era because of the different surfaces and styles of play :rolleyes: the true reason that jerkoffs like this guy feel tennis is becoming boring is because the top 200 male players are so much closer to each other in terms of ability, on any given day someone is gonna win and someone is gonna lose!!!

In olden days, where this guy obviously comes from, the matches until the semi-finals were virtually a foregone conclusion so the only guys anyone really watched and knew were the top 10 - and if you look at the top 10 of today and compare it to the top 10 of maybe 15 years ago you will find a mix of styles that is almost the same .......................;)

there are serve volleys, counter-punchers, baseliners, all-court players

Basically this so-called tennis journalist needs to be sacked and sent back into the stinky, dusty old library he was dragged from to write this article. :fiery:

dbc
08-29-2002, 09:02 PM
This guy should be taken out and shot.
Does he think that if a sport isn't dominated by Americans it's dead & buried - he should look at the viewing figures for the Soccer World Cup (& I never watch that).
Also in the late 80's tennis was dominated by 2 players - Becker & Edberg and they were both serve/volley players who never stayed longer on the baseline than was absolutely necessary.
Rafter - an Australian - won the US Open 2 years on the trot & he felt the same.
Sorry but it's not only the Spaniards & S. Americans who play from the baseline. Take a look at anyone who went to the Bolletieri acadamy & see where they play from - & there's nothing much more American than that.

Vera
08-29-2002, 09:53 PM
I don't get it. When big servers giving a 1-2 punch, they asked where is the rally. When the baseliners exchanging shots after shots, grinding it out, they say what's wrong with tennis. Why can't tennis player be good at everything to please everyone.:rolleyes:

Dissident
08-30-2002, 02:20 AM
:rolleyes:
They really dont get tired of this s**t...
:rolleyes:

Gandalf
08-30-2002, 06:57 AM
So he likes the 'serve and volley style' of Chang and Agassi but not the 'baseline play' of Edberg, Becker and Henman... :rolleyes:

When will Americans realise that the world is much bigger than their country?.

Chloe le Bopper
09-01-2002, 06:07 AM
omg someone else who says "twonk" :D :D :D


Moving on to the topic at hand ;)

I will echo all of you with "what a tool".

God forbid, the sport of tennis just can't go on if more then one or two of the seeded men happen to be non american.

I say that we just get rid of the sport all together. I mean, god knows that sports that aren't dominated by americans are internationally ignored.

Like what is this football crap the rest of the world is into?

;)

natalie
09-01-2002, 05:47 PM
pff americans...;)

I'm just happy that this is a sport that isn't dominated right now by any country... it's so much more exciting.
Like on the women's side, everybody knows that yet again an american player will win, where's the excitement for Americans if an american player wins? They always win. If a guy from thailand wins something, it's a big deal back home, because it's rare...
So I hope it stays like this, now some variation on the women's side, plz...

Lily
09-01-2002, 06:23 PM
Americans are greedy and impatient. We want everything and we want it now! lol

But really we are, thats what we're taught. Basically we're told that the US is the greatest country and no other country matters. I mean, they cant say that, but thats really what they think. Theres no appreciation of other countries, other people and then of course this carries into sports. Americans dont care about soccer cause we're not the best at it and right now most Americans dont care about tennis cause of the same reason. We're not dominating right now. Yeah, the women are and thats why womens tennis is so popular here. But mens tennis does not exist. We still talk about Pete and Andre as if they're just starting on the tour. Even Andy and James dont exist yet cause they havent won a major.

Ever since 9-11 people here have been wondering why do they hate us. Well, that article is a good start.

Go Nalby
09-03-2002, 06:16 AM
I agree...sometimes I wish the U.S. would open up its eyes to the world around it. It's so embarassing to hear that so many European players can speak four or five languages, while Americans need remedial help in English.

I love my country dearly, but at the same time...there are a lot of things here that need fixing.

And as for Mr. Deford: He never has anything significant to say. He's been spewing this dumb crap for years, either in print or on TV.

Jem
09-03-2002, 02:16 PM
Gee whiz, guys!

For those of you who don't know, Frank Deford writes this kind of thing all the time -- In fact, I've never once seen anything good from him about tennis, even though he's co-written some books on the subject. Tennis is surviving very well in the United States and will continue to do so. All that said, he does have a point. The best U.S. athletes are not interested in tennis. Instead, they more focused on team sports -- football, basketball and, yes, even soccer. Although our friends in foreign countries may not realize it, soccer is making huge popular gains in this country, and many of our best athletes are taking it up. I don't know if it will ever rival U.S. football in popularity, but it is becoming big stuff in this country. My three daughters -- much to my dismay -- chose soccer over tennis!

Defford is a dip, so just take what he says with a grain of salt. He likes to incite people with his writing, but if you read it carefully, there's usually something of merit to be found. And let's face it, for the most part, most U.S. champions have played serve and volley style, while most European champions have been baseliners. So you can't really take him to task on that assertion. But if he truly took the time to watch the men play these days, he would see that the rallies are amazing to watch. I think men's tennis is about as good as it's been in a very long time.