HitchHiker must be a journalist [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

HitchHiker must be a journalist

WyveN
07-05-2004, 02:57 PM
Instead of entertaining us on MTF hitchhiker went and wrote some garbage in the newspaper.



Artist on court' is nothing special off it

July 5, 2004

WIMBLEDON, England - Well, they got it half right, charismatically speaking.

The happy Swiss collapsed backward, covering his unshaven face and the tears that might come and imitating the joyous Russian of the day before, Roger Federer joined Maria Sharapova for the first Wimbledon waltz.

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A well-suited match they make, both with ponytails, hers longer than his, and at eye-level, she as tall as him.

But what will come next for the two of them is more lopsided, because Sharapova is the new princess of a sport desperate for royalty, and Federer is just more of the usual yawn.

"I'm going to the ball, I can't believe I'm saying that. I'm going to the ball."

That was Sharapova the day before, every bit of 17, all bubbly giggles and wide eyes, on the brink of whatever happens next. Federer has done this dance and no one stared.

"I got lucky, I guess," is what Federer said after he had whipped Andy Roddick, and no one argued, not because it was true, but because it wasn't.

Too bad, too, because this grim piece of work is the best in the world and, at 22, could be the best for a very long time.

You thought Peter Sampras was dull, this guy makes Sampras seem like Cedric the Entertainer.

Here's what his home country did for Federer after he won Wimbledon last year. It gave him a milk cow. And he was happy to get it. What he will get this time is uncertain, but goats make a nice encore gift. If he does it enough, he can have the whole chorus from old MacDonald's farm.

Roddick, the scruffy Yank, on July 4, his baseball cap turned front to back, watched Federer tote the trophy around Centre Court with the blank interest of a bridesmaid, suddenly once again the future of tennis and not the present. He seemed not that greatly disappointed, all in all.

"I threw the kitchen sink at Roger," said Roddick, speaking pure American, "but he went to the bathroom and got his tub."

It would have been a regeneration for tennis if Roddick had managed to win from in front, or after the rain break or if he could follow his crashing serve to the net for easy volleys.

Roddick is still all thunder and no lightning, while Federer is a quiet storm that doesn't stop until it has ruined the crops.

According to fellow pro Marat Safin, "Roger has everything, and a backhand."

Certainly a backhand would help Roddick, and you root for him to get one. With Federer you must appreciate precision, almost never worth the effort.

"Roger is the one person I would pay to watch play tennis," Martina Navratilova said. "He is an artist on the court."

Beware the compliment that reaches too far. Tennis players are not artists. We do not watch tennis for the art. We do not watch tennis much at all, in fact, which is a problem that art will not cure.

A movie coming out about Wimbledon was delayed until the fall not because it is preposterous (an Englishman wins) but because it is about tennis.

When tennis has had its greatest runs it has been because of flamboyance and petulance, going back to Pancho Gonzalez, through Jimmy Connors and John McEnroe, Ilie Nastase, Andre Agassi, the early Agassi.

Tennis needs not necessarily an American at the top but it does need someone with a pulse, someone with personality. It doesn't need someone with character as much as a character, and wearing your hair like a librarian spinster doesn't count.

It needs a Roddick, and it had one briefly after the U.S. Open last year, but Wimbledon is the place that validates. All the rest are New Haven.

"I left everything out there," Roddick said. "Hopefully we'll get to do this again some time."

Federer's only concession to fame is to allow his name to be connected to some "Fell the Touch" bath products for men, cologne, after-shave, deodorant, (your basic hotel emergency pack) sold only in Switzerland.

If Sharapova can't do better than that in one phone call (on a phone that works), tennis is truly beyond rescue.

Clearly Federer's second Wimbledon title was overshadowed by Sharapova's first. She is Magical Maria Supernova and he is Roger the Steady. Which T-shirt would you wear?

She climbed into the stands to hug her father and strangers wept. She struggled with a cell phone to call her mother to tell her she had won Wimbledon. Strangers cheered. She apologized to Serena Williams for taking away her title and strangers sighed.

Serena was gracious in defeat, if admitting to being only "20 percent," and she warned Magical Maria that everything is going to change.

Sharapova swore she would be ready. "I've told people," she said, "if I change, hit me in the head, please."

Tell someone to pat Federer on the head if he does.

Auscon
07-05-2004, 03:03 PM
I could smell the stench of that article before I even opened this thread

Ballbuster
07-05-2004, 03:26 PM
pft, I figured that out a long time ago. Someone that dumb has to be a journalist

RonE
07-05-2004, 03:29 PM
This article reminds me of the articles following Pete's first title in '93.

Unfortunately our press seems to be sinking to lower and lower depths with each passing year :o

SanTaureau Fan
07-05-2004, 03:39 PM
Ok so when someone says Andy is boring to watch, it's the truth; when someone says Federer is boring, it's garbage?

At the end, it's all subjective. The article is biased on a certain side and certainly not "great", but it's not garbage.

Why are some of you only want to read articles that you'll agree with? Just because an article doesn't fit with your views doesn't mean it's "garbage".

Action Jackson
07-05-2004, 03:47 PM
Ok so when someone says Andy is boring to watch, it's the truth; when someone says Federer is boring, it's garbage?

At the end, it's all subjective. The article is biased on a certain side and certainly not "great", but it's not garbage.

Why are some of you only want to read articles that you'll agree with? Just because an article doesn't fit with your views doesn't mean it's "garbage".

Actually this particular article is garbage for the reason is that it's not well-written. If an article is well researched and written well, then even if the reader doesn't agree with the message, then it won't be dismissed as garbage.

WyveN
07-05-2004, 03:49 PM
Ok so when someone says Andy is boring to watch, it's the truth; when someone says Federer is boring, it's garbage?

At the end, it's all subjective. The article is biased on a certain side and certainly not "great", but it's not garbage.

Why are some of you only want to read articles that you'll agree with? Just because an article doesn't fit with your views doesn't mean it's "garbage".

So you agree with the article?
You agree with the parts that say "Andy got whipped", Roger wasnt lucky and Andy doesnt seem to have a chance for the next 10 years?

Or maybe you agree with the parts of the article where this great journalist says Roddick cant hit a backhand or a volley?

SanTaureau Fan
07-05-2004, 03:50 PM
So you agree with the article?

Is it what I said :scratch:

I just said that it was an average article and not garbage.

WyveN
07-05-2004, 03:51 PM
Is it what I said :scratch:

I just said that it was an average article and not garbage.

Unfortunately in tennis journalism, average articles are garbage.

Action Jackson
07-05-2004, 04:01 PM
Its more like something from a comic than a newspaper, a very poor summary and no thought behind it. He's as tall as Sharapova and both have ponytails? I mean come on !! Anyone know which newspaper it was from or what country?

Yes, the sad thing it's from the Guardian, one of the better English papers, and this guy has actually written some average stuff before this. It was probably a dare or hitchhiker hacked his email address and wrote this under his name.

Lee
07-05-2004, 04:10 PM
He's as tall as Sharapova and both have ponytails? I mean come on !!

;) Roger is shorter than Sharapova since she wore a pair of high heels at least 5 inches high. Why an athelete risks ankle injury with that pair of shoes is beyond me?

jtipson
07-05-2004, 04:14 PM
;) Roger is shorter than Sharapova since she wore a pair of high heels at least 5 inches high. Why an athelete risks ankle injury with that pair of shoes is beyond me?

I saw the pics this morning and wondered why a girl who must be 6 feet tall would need or even want to wear such high heels.

Sad to say I actually bought the Guardian today - I never normally do and I probably won't again if this is the standard of their "tennis journalism".

rulestheworld
07-05-2004, 04:27 PM
And just for fun, an article that isn't rubbish... :)


Federer: A champion and his own man

By STEVE WILSTEIN, AP Sports Columnist
July 5, 2004
WIMBLEDON, England (AP) -- Without a coach, agent, business manager, publicist, personal assistant, bodyguard, cook or chauffeur, Roger Federer still manages to win championships.

He carries his own rackets, packs his own suitcases, makes his own travel plans.

Nobody plans his strategy or fiddles with his strokes.

Some players need help tying their own shoes and tucking in their shirts. Federer, a 22-year-old from Switzerland, is his own man. He has a dozen ways to hit backhands, nearly as much variety on forehands, and several disguises on serves, but Team Federer is basically a mom-and-pop affair with help from his longtime girlfriend.

That self-reliance toughened Federer and got him out of trouble Sunday when he came from a set back against Andy Roddick to win a second straight Wimbledon and third Grand Slam title, 4-6, 7-5, 7-6 (3), 6-4.

While Roddick kept glancing up toward his coach, Brad Gilbert, for nods of encouragement, Federer searched within himself to find a way to win. Racket artistry wasn't enough. Federer needed a change of tactics and he came up with one: abandon the baseline and attack at the net.

Federer hasn't had a coach since splitting with Peter Lundgren last December. All Federer has done since then is win the Australian Open, four tour titles, and now Wimbledon again to reaffirm his status as No. 1. His 2004 record is 46-4.

``Roger has learned self-discipline,'' his mother, Lynette, said on the lawn of the players' lounge, where she shared victory champagne with her son, family and friends. ``This is a very important phase in his career, that he could step back, not rely on somebody, get to know himself, get to know his own tennis and technique.

``I've got a feeling that a period without a coach -- I don't say it's ideal -- has made him take a lot of initiative. He's become a little more creative, he's worked on himself. I think he's never worked as hard since he hasn't had a coach.''

She and her husband, Robert, who stayed home in Switzerland because he was too nervous to watch in person, help keep their son's business affairs humming. His longtime girlfriend, former player Mirka Vavrinec, doubles as his publicist.

``I'm very in-house,'' Federer says.

He may work with a coach again, but is in no rush to find one. His parents consider a coach to be important but are content to watch their son continue to make the big decisions in his career, no matter how they turn out.

Federer figured out for himself what he had to do to beat Roddick, whose imposing serves of up to 145 mph, aggressive net attacks, and strong forehands carried him to a first-set win.

``I threw the kitchen sink at him, but he went to the bathroom and got a tub,'' Roddick said.

After Federer evened the match in the second set, he fell behind a break at 4-2 in the third when a light rain brought the covers out for a second time. Roddick conferred with Gilbert and stayed with the strategy they had laid out before the match. Federer did his own analysis and figured it was time to switch to a serve-and-volley style.

``I thought about what was going on,'' Federer said. ``I thought maybe that will allow me to get some more free points and not to have to go every time in a rally, because that was actually the thing that was killing me. Because from the baseline, on my serve he was taking a lot of risk. That was very dangerous for me. This makes me extremely happy and proud that I actually did take the right choice in such a moment.''

Federer and his family also took pride in how coolly he handled that small crisis, the six break points he brushed away in the fourth set, and the other challenges he's faced on court the past couple of years. For a player who had a reputation as a tennis brat growing up, throwing tantrums and rackets like John McEnroe, Federer has turned into Bjorn Borg-like master of impassive play.

``When he was younger, he was very ambitious,'' Lynette Federer said. ``When he didn't achieve what he wanted he could get a little erratic on the court. He realized he was just wasting energy. Today he proved it in the fourth set (when he was) down on his serve. Years ago, he would have thrown the racket or shouted and wasted energy. Today he's learned to get his emotions under control.''

Federer's parents are happy about that, since they always cringed when they watched him act up on court as a youngster. But they're most proud of the way he's grown into a confident and independent man.

``We really respect the way he left home very young and he's taken his career into his own hands,'' his mother said. ``He's gotten used to fighting and keeping up his level. He needed to mature.''

Asked if she thought a few years ago, when he was still struggling, that the maturity might never come, she nodded.

``Yeah, I did,'' she said. ``He just needed his time. Roger always needed to go over certain hurdles to give him a little push in his career. It happened as a child at school, it happened in sports. Every time he bumped his head he improved, he always made a big jump. Everything happened step by step. Now he's there where he wants to be.''

Gonzo Hates Me!
07-05-2004, 04:47 PM
I saw the pics this morning and wondered why a girl who must be 6 feet tall would need or even want to wear such high heels.

Because, she's young and hot, and fashion is a fun expression. Many tall girls enjoy being even taller as well; I love towering over people whenever I hit the town ;)

That entire outfit was Louis Vuitton by the way. Maria is on her way to being a designer favorite. Nicely done Masha!

Why an athelete risks ankle injury with that pair of shoes is beyond me?

england_rules
07-05-2004, 04:52 PM
I don't think Roddick has much character either! Like when he pretended that he had farted yesterday on court after the camera fell off, you could tell he hadd been thinking really hard for something to do. It didn't come naturally for him like the other players mentioned in the article!

Ballbuster
07-05-2004, 05:35 PM
Because, she's young and hot, and fashion is a fun expression. Many tall girls enjoy being even taller as well; I love towering over people whenever I hit the town ;)

That entire outfit was Louis Vuitton by the way. Maria is on her way to being a designer favorite. Nicely done Masha!

pics of the outfit, please. here or andy's forum fine

crimson
07-05-2004, 06:20 PM
Yes, the sad thing it's from the Guardian, one of the better English papers, and this guy has actually written some average stuff before this. It was probably a dare or hitchhiker hacked his email address and wrote this under his name.

Are you sure it's from The Guardian? I get that newspaper and there was nothing like that in the sports pages today, only positive articles about Federer. :confused: I also did a search on the website and the article is not there either.

According to this thread (http://www.menstennisforums.com/showthread.php?t=12336) which posted the same article, it seems to be an article from the Canadian Press.

I think the Guardian's tennis journalism is pretty good, and they have always spoken highly about Roger. See this most recent article:
http://sport.guardian.co.uk/wimbledon2004/story/0,14530,1254135,00.html

For bad tennis journalism, then you should see some of the rubbish they write about tennis in The Herald, which is a newspaper I sometimes get here in Scotland. One of the journalists in particular, Rob Robertson, is always making snide personal remarks about Roger, saying he has no personality and comparing him to a Toblerone bar :rolleyes: , and their tennis articles in general are not very well researched; in fact they hardly write about tennis at all the rest of the year round.

Action Jackson
07-05-2004, 06:26 PM
Are you sure it's from The Guardian? I get that newspaper and there was nothing like that in the sports pages today, only positive articles about Federer. :confused: I also did a search on the website and the article is not there either.

According to this thread (http://www.menstennisforums.com/showthread.php?t=12336) which posted the same article, it seems to be an article from the Canadian Press.

I think the Guardian's tennis journalism is pretty good, and they have always spoken highly about Roger. See this most recent article:
http://sport.guardian.co.uk/wimbledon2004/story/0,14530,1254135,00.html

For bad tennis journalism, then you should see some of the rubbish they write about tennis in The Herald, which is a newspaper I sometimes get here in Scotland. One of the journalists in particular, Rob Robertson, is always making snide personal remarks about Roger, saying he has no personality and comparing him to a Toblerone bar :rolleyes: , and their tennis articles in general are not very well researched; in fact they hardly write about tennis at all the rest of the year round.

Actually this was a mistake by myself. I thought it was strange, as I posted articles from the Guardian about Roger elsewhere which weren't negative at all.

I actually read it wrong, and it was the article above that was a positive one written by Stephen Brierly, who is usually alright.

Still trying to find the source.

Clara Bow
07-05-2004, 06:54 PM
I think that the original writer of this Bernie Lincicome at the Rocky Mountain News. A link with the column, his email, and picture of his somewhat smug looking mug can be found at:
http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/sports_columnists/article/0,1299,DRMN_83_3013133,00.html

Marc Rosset is Tall
07-05-2004, 07:26 PM
I think that the original writer of this Bernie Lincicome at the Rocky Mountain News. A link with the column, his email, and picture of his somewhat smug looking mug can be found at:
http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/sports_columnists/article/0,1299,DRMN_83_3013133,00.html

This gimp should stick to covering rodeo.

RexEverything
07-05-2004, 07:29 PM
What a hilarious prick. He should crave back into his tomb. I tend to send him an E-mail. Just wanna "argue" a little bit with him. I mean, I don't like those guys sneaking up Roger's ass in every article either, but this guy is just waaaay too much.

Neutron bombs, anyone?

Chloe le Bopper
07-06-2004, 02:56 AM
Okay, I admit it. I wrote the article.

jtipson
07-06-2004, 12:24 PM
Are you sure it's from The Guardian? I get that newspaper and there was nothing like that in the sports pages today, only positive articles about Federer. :confused: I also did a search on the website and the article is not there either.

According to this thread (http://www.menstennisforums.com/showthread.php?t=12336) which posted the same article, it seems to be an article from the Canadian Press.


When I got home last night and read my Guardian I couldn't find it either. Have to agree that their standard is usually high (when I read their online articles at least), although I do often disagree with Stephen B's articles.

Clara Bow
07-06-2004, 01:06 PM
When I got home last night and read my Guardian I couldn't find it either. Have to agree that their standard is usually high (when I read their online articles at least), although I do often disagree with Stephen B's articles.

I think it originated in the Rocky Mountain News. I provided the link above.

jtipson
07-06-2004, 01:58 PM
I think it originated in the Rocky Mountain News. I provided the link above.

Yes, thanks Clara. I just mentioned that because I'd previously and erroneously blamed the Guardian too!

Clara Bow
07-06-2004, 03:34 PM
Slightly OT: I'm just kind of curious- I haven't read much of Guardian's sports columns - but have read some of their entertainment columns. Do their sports articles tend to be snarky ? have found that thier profiles of celebrites can be kind of bitchy.

Action Jackson
07-06-2004, 03:41 PM
Yes, thanks Clara. I just mentioned that because I'd previously and erroneously blamed the Guardian too!

No, it was my fault jtip and not yours. As I said in my previous post about this I read the wrong article as it wasn't linked, whereas the Guardian was, that's why I made that comment.

Action Jackson
07-06-2004, 03:42 PM
Slightly OT: I'm just kind of curious- I haven't read much of Guardian's sports columns - but have read some of their entertainment columns. Do their sports articles tend to be snarky ? have found that thier profiles of celebrites can be kind of bitchy.

The answer is no, and why do celebrities deserve to be fawned upon?