Remember Him?: ATP players who fell off the map [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Remember Him?: ATP players who fell off the map

Eden
02-13-2008, 01:52 PM
Remember Him?: ATP players who fell off the map

It happens all the time. Players shoot into the top 20, top 10 – even to No. 1 – and then suddenly go away. We take a look at some of the prominent vanishing acts of recent years.

By Robert Waltz


MARIO ANCIC

http://tennis.com/uploadedImages/Editorial/General/2008_02_11_Mario_article.jpg

Career-high ranking
No. 7 (July 10, 2006)

2007 year-end ranking
No. 85

WHAT HAPPENED

He’s still the last player to beat Roger Federer at Wimbledon, and two years ago seemed finally to be finding more in his game than just a big serve. He reached the top ten with a string of solid results in 2006 – Auckland final, Marseille final, Miami and Rome quarterfinals, Hamburg semifinals, French Open quarters, and a title at 's-Hertogenbosch. A Wimbledon quarterfinal took him to his career high. Then – he didn't play again until Beijing. He made the final there, and went on to win Saint Petersburg and make the Paris quarterfinal.
The beginning of 2007 saw him back in the Top Ten again -- but he managed to play only three events before he came down sick with one of those strength-draining bugs. He wasn't able to play again until the Canadian Open, and he missed the U. S. Open, and fell out of the Top Fifty after Saint Petersburg.

OUTLOOK

Optimistic, except for the threat of more injuries
It's ironic to note that, even as Ancic's ranking began to drop dramatically, he began returning to form. His record in his last four events of 2007 was 7-4, and be beat Blake once and Mathieu twice in that time. The only question is, can he stay healthy enough to make those results stand up over a full year? Things don’t look too good thus far – he pulled out of both Auckland and the Australian Open with a stomach illness. He makes his comeback in Marseille this week.

GUILLERMO CORIA

http://tennis.com/uploadedImages/Editorial/General/2008_02_11_Coria_article.jpg

Career-high ranking
No. 3 (May 3, 2004)

2007 year-end ranking
Unranked

WHAT HAPPENED

To an extent, Guillermo Coria is honest about his current problem: He admits it's all in his head, claiming that he is fine in practice and lousy in competition. Once a kind of Rafael Nadal forerunner, the 2004 Roland Garros finalist also won Monte Carlo and Buenos Aires and made the final of Miami that year. But he didn't even play in 2007 thanks to a combination of mental and physical problems.
The slide began in April 2006, when he lost his opening match at seven of eight events and stopped playing after the US Open. His big victory since had come in a different kind of court – he won a large settlement from the supplement makers whose contaminated product led to his positive doping test in 2001.

OUTLOOK

Not optimistic yet, but potential for optimism
After delaying his comeback several times because of a string of small injuries, Coria finally returned last November at the Belo Horizonte challenger in Brazil and also played the Asuncion challenger in Paraguay, losing in the first round both times. He also lost his opening match at Vina del Mar in his first event this year, but did win a set and managed to avoid getting hurt. He still has a long way to go, but perhaps his was the first step. Will Costa do Sauipe this week be the second?


YOUNES EL ANYANOUI

http://tennis.com/uploadedImages/Editorial/General/2008_02_011_ElAynaoui_article.jpg

Career-high ranking
No. 14 (Nov. 3, 2003)

2007 year-end ranking
No. 170

WHAT HAPPENED

El Aynaoui was definitely a late bloomer -- he was almost 28 when he won his first title in 1999. He didn't win another until 2001, around the time he turned 30, then won three more at age 30 in 2002. He didn't win any titles in 2003, but had two Slam quarterfinals and a semifinal at Madrid to reach a career high. But in 2004, he came down with plantar fascitis, missing most of the year. In 2005, he played 12 ATP events, but earned only one win. In 2006, his only main draws were at Dubai and Doha.

OUTLOOK

Out of time
El Aynaoui's biggest problem may just be the fact that he's 36 years old. He played several challengers in 2007 with mixed results and was granted a spot at three ATP events – Doha, Dubai, and Casablanca – winning only one match. There's been no publicized word on retirement, but he hasn’t played since last August and another comeback would be tough.


MARDY FISH

http://tennis.com/uploadedImages/Editorial/General/2008_02_11_Fish_article.jpg


Career-high ranking
No. 17 (March 22, 2004)

2007 year-end ranking
No. 39

WHAT HAPPENED

Maybe it would have been safer for Mardy Fish to stay in Minnesota and try a good Minnesota sport. Ice fishing, say. You don't get any exercise, but at least you don't get hurt unless the ice house sinks into the lake...
Fish's troubles began in 2004, when he suffered a hip problem; he missed the clay season, played Wimbledon, but then missed Cincinnati and Toronto. He made the Olympic final, but ended the year ranked No. 37. Then wrist trouble set in. He started 2005 slowly, missed Wimbledon, and did not play after the U. S. Open. His ranking was below No. 200 when he came back at Delray Beach 2006, and he lost his first three matches back, leaving him below no. 300. He then won Houston, didn't play another ATP match until Wimbledon – but had a fine second half of the year; in his last nine events, he won at least one match at eight.

OUTLOOK

Optimistic except for the threat of more injuries
He started 2007 with an Auckland semifinal and an Australian Open quarterfinal, but he won only one match between Memphis and Los Angeles, and again missed the French Open. He seems to be turning into one of those guys who just can't get healthy – unfortunately, since he still plays pretty well when he is healthy. His Australian Open this year was moderately promising – a defeat of Tommy Robredo and a relatively tough fight against Jarrko Nieminen in the third round.


GASTON GAUDIO

http://tennis.com/uploadedImages/Editorial/General/2008_02_11_Gaudio_article.jpg

Career-high ranking
No. 5 (April 25, 2005)

2007 year-end ranking
No. 180

WHAT HAPPENED

Clay specialists like Gaston Gaudio are sunk if they don’t win during the clay spring and summer. Gaudio's unexpected title at Roland Garros in 2004 led him to a fine start to this part of 2005, including titles at Estoril, Gstaad and Kitzbuhel – enough to let him end the year in the top 10. But in 2006, he had no titles, no finals, and only two semifinals (Acapulco and Monte Carlo). Small wonder, then, that he ended the year below the Top Thirty – and about to go lower.

OUTLOOK

It's all in the mind
Last year saw him sink rapidly into uncertainty and self-doubt. He won only six ATP matches (five of them on clay), and began muttering about retirement. He fell out of the Top Hundred in mid-year, and was reduced to playing challengers thereafter. After winning just three games in his first ATP match of the year in Vina del Mar, he was again talking about retirement.


ROBBY GINEPRI

http://tennis.com/uploadedImages/Editorial/General/2008_02_11_Ginepri_article.jpg

Career-high ranking
No. 15 (May 15, 2006)

2007 year-end ranking
No. 132


WHAT HAPPENED

Robby Ginepri's career has a yo-yo aspect to it. In 2003, he won his first title (Newport), reached the quarterfinal at three Masters events, the third round at the U. S. Open, and hit the Top Thirty. In 2004, he went 22-26 and slumped to No. 61. In 2005, he roared back to life, with a title at Indianapolis plus semifinals at Cincinnati, Madrid, and the U. S. Open; that put him at No. 16 at year-end, and he managed to move up to No. 15 briefly in 2006. But 2006 saw the string winding down again; he had only one semifinal (at Indianapolis), and fell out of the Top Fifty after Madrid.
That meant 2007 should have been a good year – but instead he had only 11 wins in his 20 ATP events; he didn't make a quarterfinal all year.

OUTLOOK

Should have a few good results left in him
He's still young enough that he could have one more comeback in store, but he certainly isn't showing signs of it at the moment.
The winning US Davis Cup team – Andy Roddick, James Blake and the Bryans – petitioned the USTA to give Ginepri the reciprocal wildcard into the Australian Open, but they didn’t, and he lost in the first round of qualifying after having to retire in his second qualifying match in Sydney a week earlier.


JOACHIM JOHANSSON

http://tennis.com/uploadedImages/Editorial/General/2008_02_11_JoachimJohansson_article.jpg

Career-high ranking
No. 9 (Feb. 14, 2005)

2007 year-end ranking
No. 339

WHAT HAPPENED

Mark down another skyrocket. At the end of 2003, Johansson was a mere No. 113 and known best as the boyfriend of Lleyton Hewitt's sister. At the end of 2004, he was No. 11 and on his way to a brief stay in the Top Ten. He did that on the strength of a title at Memphis, a semifinal at the U. S. Open, a couple of Masters quarterfinals, and a fourth round at Wimbledon. He started 2005 with a title at Adelaide, a fourth round at the Australian Open, and a title at Marseille.
Then the big server's disease (i.e. shoulder and elbow problems) set in. He did not play after Bastad, and fell out of the Top Fifty by year-end. He made one brief attempt at a comeback at San Jose 2006, lost his opener, and didn't play another ATP event until Stockholm 2006 – by which time his ranking was down to No. 690. He made the semifinal, then the Round of Sixteen at Madrid, and started 2007 with a semifinal at Adelaide. But he didn’t play from the Australian Open till the Davis Cup in September – and his one Davis Cup match kept him out for another three weeks with exhaustion. Making a return at Stockholm, he won one match before having to withdraw yet again.

OUTLOOK

Retired
He's been through everything: Sickness, exhaustion, injury – and now, retirement. Earlier this month, Johnasson announced that doctors could prescribe only a “long period of rest” for his problems, and he felt it was better to call it quits.


THOMAS JOHANSSON

http://tennis.com/uploadedImages/Editorial/General/2008_02_11_ThomasJohansson_article.jpg

Career-high ranking
No. 7 (June 10, 2002)

2007 year-end ranking
No. 62


WHAT HAPPENED

What is it about the Johanssons? Thomas is no relation to Joachim, but he too has had his struggles. Some are simply "ordinary" – despite winning the Australian Open in 2002, he ended the season a mere No. 14 because he was out for most of the fall, and the problems cost him his entire 2003 season. But climbed back to No. 14 by the end of 2005, only to get hit in the eye with a ball. Suffering with his vision, he hasn’t really been the same since, despite one out-of-the-blue final at Saint Petersburg.

OUTLOOK

May have a couple of good results left in him, but running out of time

He fell out of the top 100 for a while in 2007 but seems to be improving on the whole – he did make the Stockholm 2007 final and won two singles matches for Sweden against Israel in Davis Cup last wek. A return to the Top Fifty is likely, but he’ll soon be 33.


NICOLAS KIEFER

http://tennis.com/uploadedImages/Editorial/General/2008_02_11_Kiefer_article.jpg


Career-high ranking
No. 4 (Jan. 10, 2000)

2007 year-end ranking
No. 49


WHAT HAPPENED

For Nicolas Kiefer, it appears it's only a matter of time. He started 2006 strong, notably with an Australian Open semifinal (helped a little bit by a thrown racquet). He was pushing toward the Top Ten when he got hurt. It took him just over a year to come back, but he's gone 19-11 since then, with three semifinals (Los Angeles, Beijing, Madrid) and has only three first round losses (two of them coming in his first three events).

OUTLOOK

Optimistic barring more injuries.
Unless there are other major setbacks, he’s on track to be Top Thirty by this time next year. Despite a tame first-round loss t Juan Carlos Ferrero in the first round of the Australian Open, he’s eager to be out there, expressing disappointment that he wasn’t chosen for Germany’s latest Davis Cup tie.


GUSTAVO KUERTEN

http://tennis.com/uploadedImages/Editorial/General/2008_02_11_Kuerten_article.jpg

Career-high ranking
No. 1 (Dec. 4, 2000)

2007 year-end ranking
No. 676


WHAT HAPPENED

As early as last year, Gustavo Kuerten admitted that, if things didn't get better, he'll have to pack it in and retire. They didn't get better. His hip has been bothering him for years now, and no one has found a cure. The last year in which he played anything like a full schedule was 2005; he had nine events, all between Valencia an the U. S. Open – but only three matches, one at Valencia, one at Hamburg, and one in Flushing Meadows. In 2006, he played only one match, losing at Costa do Sauipe to No. 313 Andre Ghem.

OUTLOOK

About to retire
In 2007, Kuerten managed five events – but only one win. He has finally conceded defeat: This is his last year. He will play a few events, such as Costa do Sauipe, and retire after the French Open.


NICOLAS LAPENTTI

http://tennis.com/uploadedImages/Editorial/General/2008_02_11_Lapentti_article.jpg


Career-high ranking
No. 6 (Nov. 2, 1999)

2007 year-end ranking
No. 111


WHAT HAPPENED

Injuries seem to run in the Lapentti family -- 2004 was a lost year for Nicolas, and brother Giovanni seems unable to get healthy. But Nicolas, in 2007, seemed simply to be winding down. He picked up some nice points in late 2006, when he made the final at Palermo, but the following year was tough; he went 11-16 at the ATP level, and only once won back-to-back ATP matches.

OUTLOOK

Running out of time
He spent most of 2007 in the Top 100 but fell out by year-end. Lapentti seems to have small revivals every few years, but they get smaller each time – and he's 31 now.


XAVIER MALISSE

http://tennis.com/uploadedImages/Editorial/General/2008_02_11_Malisse_article.jpg


Career-high ranking
No. 19 (Aug. 12, 2002)

2007 year-end ranking
No. 109


WHAT HAPPENED

If Xavier Malisse could find a way to get healthy, it's hard to tell how high he might go -- he's gotten over his finals jinx, and won more than two-thirds of the matches he played in 2007. The problem is, he had only six events in 2007, winning Chennai and Delray Beach but still posting a record of only 10-4. He went down after losing first round at Memphis, managed to play two matches at the U. S. Open, and thenplayed only one challenger thereafter.

OUTLOOK

Semi-optimistic, but injuries remain a danger
This must be frustrating for a guy who, for so long, was hobbled by his head; no sooner did he fix that than everything else broke down. After this week’s first-round loss at his favorite event, Delray Beach (two titles and five finals), he admitted he’s still looking for confidence. Still, with so little play last year, there’s plenty of room to move up.


FELIX MANTILLA

http://tennis.com/uploadedImages/Editorial/General/2008_02_11_Mantilla_article.jpg

Career-high ranking
No. 10 (June 10, 1998)

2007 year-end ranking
No. 414

WHAT HAPPENED

In one sense, Mantilla's decline isn't as scary as it looks -- he now considers himself a part-time player. But the reason he's part-time is scary: He contracted skin cancer. True, tennis players are out in the sun a lot -- but he's still only 33, and the cancer started when he was still only about 31. It cost him the entire 2006 season.

OUTLOOK

Playing for fun
He came back in a small way for the 2007 clay season, but it's more for fun than anything else; his main weapon was always speed, and he admits to having slowed down.


MARK PHILIPPOUSSIS

http://tennis.com/uploadedImages/Editorial/General/2008_02_11_Philippoussis_article.jpg


Career-high ranking
No. 8 (April 19, 1999)

2007 year-end ranking
Unranked


WHAT HAPPENED

They talk about out-of-body experiences, but what Mark Philippousis needs is an out-of-knee experience. The troublesome joint let him play only half a year in 2006 and took him out of action in 2007 entirely.

OUTLOOK

Pessimistic
The good news is, "Scud" managed to play the Australian Open wildcard playoff (though he refused to play a meaningless match). There was hope he was finally healthy.
But it looks like we can forget it. He has had to undergo surgery again, and his date of return is unknown.


MARIANO PUERTA

http://tennis.com/uploadedImages/Editorial/General/2008_02_11_Puerta_article.jpg



Career-high ranking
No. 9 (Aug. 15, 2005)

2007 year-end ranking
No. 264

WHAT HAPPENED

Puerta is that most special of special cases, because he did and did not achieve results -- yes, he made the Roland Garros final, but when he failed a drug test (for the second time), the points were taken away and he was given what seemed at the time to be a life suspension.
But nothing about Puerta is normal. The rules in his case were not quite clear, since an independent tribunal felt that his French Open ingestion of steroids was accidental.

OUTLOOK

Too large a mountain to climb
On appeal, his eight-year suspension was reduced to two. That is now over, but he had to come back with no ranking at all – and so had to start at the very bottom. (Again.) He has yet to play an ATP event, and of course he has never had much luck on non-clay surfaces. In his case, we really have to await developments.


MARAT SAFIN

http://tennis.com/uploadedImages/Editorial/General/2008_02_11_Safin_article.jpg

Career-high ranking
No. 1 (Nov. 20, 2000)

2007 year-end ranking
No. 56


WHAT HAPPENED

In one way, the biggest surprise about Marat Safin may that people seem always to expect miracles of him. Hard as it is to believe, the hugely talented two-time Grand Slam champion has never managed to end consecutive years in the Top Ten. This last run was in 2004, when he got back to No. 4, but even though he won the 2005 Australian Open, he ended the year at No. 12, due mostly to the fact that he was unable to play after Cincinnati. And he has never really been the same since. He says himself that his knee problems have altered the way he plays. He managed one brief patch of success at the end of 2006, when he made the Moscow final and the quarterfinals of Madrid and Paris; that took him back into the Top Thirty for a little while.

OUTLOOK

Could have a couple of good results still left in him, but extended success is unlikely
It almost seems as if 2007 has seen his bad habits crystallize; he never once made it past a quarterfinal. He hopes to adjust his game to his new body. We’ll see if he gets a chance – he didn’t even make it on court at Davis Cup after hurting his toe in practice.


RAINER SCHÜTTLER

http://tennis.com/uploadedImages/Editorial/General/2008_02_11_Schuttler_article.jpg

Career-high ranking
No. 5 (April 26, 2004)

2007 year-end ranking
Unranked


WHAT HAPPENED

Rainer Schuettler first appeared on the rankings in 1994. It was the start of something amazing: For nine straight years, from 1994 to 2003, his ranking rose every year -- sometimes by a little, sometimes by a lot, but it always was a little higher at the end of a year than it had been at the end of the year before.
Then came his amazing 2003, when he made the Australian Open final and won Tokyo and Lyon. He played 101 matches that year, winning 71 of them.
Pretty spectacular. And, on the evidence, pretty draining -- especially for a guy who was by then 27 years old and who made his living with his speed. Looking at the numbers, it really does seem as if he used himself up -- he was never the same again. In 2004, he did make the Monte Carlo final, which kept him in the Top Fifty -- but he still ended up with a losing record of 29-30. Each year since has been worse, and without any big injuries to blame for it.

OUTLOOK

Running out of time and out of inspiration
Schuettler is still plugging away, having already played five events this year. But he seems to be just a little slower than he was -- and, with nothing new to replace the lost speed, he is suffering.


PARADORN SRICHAPHAN

http://tennis.com/uploadedImages/Editorial/General/2008_02_11_Srichaphan_article.jpg


Career-high ranking
No. 9 (May 12, 2003)

2007 year-end ranking
No. 265

WHAT HAPPENED

As long ago as the end of 2005, Paradorn Srichaphan seemed to be on a downward slide: He burst into prominence in 2002 with an upset of Andre Agassi Wimbledon, and ended 2003 at No. 11 thanks to titles in Chennai and Long Island as well as fourth-round finishes at Wimbledon and the US Open. But he fell to No. 27 in 2004, and was just clinging to the Top Fifty at the end of 2005. In 2006, he managed briefly to get back up to No. 35, but again was down around No. 50 at year-end.

OUTLOOK

Comeback should be forthcoming
Last year started in brutal fashion. He won one match at the beginning of the year and was then hit by a wrist injury that has kept him off the tour since Miami. At 28, it's not clear how much of a comeback he can make. On the other hand, he did use the off season to marry a former Miss Universe, and a comeback is expected in the next few months.


MARTIN VERKERK

http://tennis.com/uploadedImages/Editorial/General/2008_02_11_Verkerk_article.jpg

Career-high ranking
No. 14 (Sept. 15, 2004)

2007 year-end ranking
No. 674


WHAT HAPPENED

Martin Verkerk probably qualifies as proof that protected injury rankings can work against you. One of the most unexpected French Open finalists in tennis history, he was doing just fine through mid-2004, but then his shoulder acted up. He had surgery that fall, and all but disappeared off the face of the earth.
The big mistake came when he finally returned to action in 2007. He not only insisted on playing at the ATP level, but he insisted on playing mostly strong tournaments: Rotterdam (one of the toughest non-Masters events), Miami, Monte Carlo, Rome, Hamburg, Roland Garros, plus three others. He lost his opener at all nine events. So he used up his injury exemptions, and got in almost no match practice. He has done nothing since.

OUTLOOK

Too large a mountain to climb
Hard to tell what shape his comeback will take -- but it appears he'll have to start at the very bottom.


Source: http://tennis.com/features/general/features.aspx?id=118768

CooCooCachoo
02-13-2008, 02:38 PM
Thanks for posting. Good overview.

Kolya
02-13-2008, 02:42 PM
How about Dominik Hrbaty?

Komodo
02-13-2008, 02:44 PM
Schuettler was unranked at the end of 2007?

Ok.
Then I must have been dreaming that he is top 100 (which is good for him at this stage).

Scotso
02-13-2008, 02:44 PM
Mardy, Robby, and Xavier were never on the map to begin with. :tape:

I didn't know Felix had cancer. :o :hug:

adee-gee
02-13-2008, 03:13 PM
Ljubicic?

Månu
02-13-2008, 03:15 PM
Massu could be there as well, ranked n.9 now n.94

Eden
02-13-2008, 03:29 PM
I didn't know Felix had cancer. :o :hug:

George had a thread about it here on GM:

http://www.menstennisforums.com/showthread.php?t=91040&highlight=mantilla

Burrow
02-13-2008, 03:30 PM
I am a fan of 16 of those players mentioned :lol:

No wonder I hardly support anybody now, all my favourite players are injured and/or having some sort of problem.

dijus
02-13-2008, 03:33 PM
thx for the article

Sunset of Age
02-13-2008, 03:33 PM
Interesting article, thanks for posting Doris!

It surely shows the relativity in Tennis Life. One day 'top of the bill', the next day, gone-and-(hopefully not by everyone!)-forgotten. Puts certain things in perspective, doesn't it?

lorenz
02-13-2008, 03:44 PM
Good Post Eden !!
Thanks

Kitty de Sade
02-13-2008, 04:14 PM
Lovely contribution, as usual, Doris. Thank you for posting. :hatoff:

Some, knowing what has happened, with injury, or retirement...can't help but wax nostalgic for a few of them. :)

tangerine_dream
02-13-2008, 04:47 PM
Ljubicic?
He wasn't on the map to begin with. ;)

Fumus
02-13-2008, 06:37 PM
What about Ferrero, Hewitt, others etc?

Sunset of Age
02-13-2008, 06:43 PM
Looks like Mario has already made a statement in reply to this article today. :)

NinaNina19
02-13-2008, 06:44 PM
Mario is back.

NinaNina19
02-13-2008, 06:44 PM
He wasn't on the map to begin with. ;)
He was higher ranked than all but 3 of these guys.

Nathaliia
02-13-2008, 06:57 PM
Robert Waltz from writing.com? :p If yes, he's a quality author and the world is so small :cool:

ChinoRios4Ever
02-13-2008, 07:27 PM
No Massu here? :awww:

alfonsojose
02-13-2008, 09:01 PM
Rainer :sobbing:

ReturnWinner
02-13-2008, 09:04 PM
Hrbaty is another one, i think he is injured

*Viva Chile*
02-13-2008, 09:17 PM
Where's Massu on that list??

TheBoiledEgg
02-13-2008, 10:00 PM
Where's Massu on that list??

Massu
what happened: never been the same without the racoon on his head :tape:

neenah
02-13-2008, 10:18 PM
Massu. :sad:

When I first started watching tennis he was in his "peak" and he was a favorite of mine. Poor Nico. :sad:

Scotso
02-13-2008, 10:20 PM
He was higher ranked than all but 3 of these guys.

Which just goes to show that he was one of the most overranked players in history. :p

jonny84
02-13-2008, 11:11 PM
Verkerk. Remember him from 2003! Shame his Roland Garros final wasnt like a springboard.

Federerhingis
02-14-2008, 12:54 AM
How about Dominik Hrbaty?

I know it almost has seemed as if he had retired, they talk so little of him lately.

Action Jackson
02-14-2008, 01:47 AM
Hrbaty had elbow surgery.

Lee
02-14-2008, 03:22 AM
What about Ferrero, Hewitt, others etc?

Because they do not fall off the map. Ferrero is currently rank 15 and Hewitt 22.

And :haha: Rainer Schuettler unranked. He ranked 99 at the end of 2007.

Voo de Mar
02-14-2008, 03:29 AM
Schuettler unranked :spit:

Kolya
02-14-2008, 05:22 AM
Jiri Novak?

Kind of fell off the map after 2002.

Stgobaiano
02-14-2008, 06:40 AM
Vlad Voltchkov

Action Jackson
02-14-2008, 06:42 AM
Jiri Novak?

Kind of fell off the map after 2002.

Have you been hiding? Jiri Novak has been retired for 2 years.

Kolya
02-14-2008, 10:10 AM
Have you been hiding? Jiri Novak has been retired for 2 years.

Sorry, forgot it was active players.

Timbo
02-15-2008, 08:33 AM
A few more...

Jan Michael Gambill
2001 ranked 14
2008 no singles ranking...doubles rank 656
only Santoro can play 2 handed both sides!

Taylor Dent
2005 ranked 21
2008 unranked
hasn't played since feb 06...will he ever play again?

and....

Ronald Agenor
1989 ranked 20
2008 Haiti Davis Cup team
played futures in 2007...is it too late for him? he's only 43

Daniel
02-15-2008, 12:36 PM
Thanks Eden for the article :)