Which player is guilty of saying "you know" far too often in interviews? [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Which player is guilty of saying "you know" far too often in interviews?

Horatio Caine
05-30-2004, 11:34 PM
A lot of players say "you know" far too often in their interviews. Who do you reckon is most guilty of saying it?

By the way, i am in no way intending to slag off their admirable effort to speak away from their own language.

Ballbuster
05-30-2004, 11:43 PM
Maria Sharapova, she's hot, but I sense another Jessica Simpson here

little duck
05-30-2004, 11:55 PM
I think that it's Roger. He says you know after every few words sometimes, and also he likes the word "obviously" which is also more and more heared among other players.

It seems that his speech is infectious. :confused:

Carito_90
05-31-2004, 12:09 AM
Definetely Jennifer 'you know' Capriati. Please read one of her interviews, it's soooo funny but annoying at the same time :lol:

JC Ferrero also says 'you know' a lot when he's speaking in english.

JCF and JCap. would make an excellent couple... they'd know everything about each other :rolleyes:

Horatio Caine
05-31-2004, 12:13 AM
Henman said "you know" 61 times in his interview after beating Llodra - that is actually quite a lot! Oh how dreadful Timothy! :)

TennisLurker
05-31-2004, 12:17 AM
ferrero barely speaks english

Horatio Caine
05-31-2004, 12:19 AM
ferrero barely speaks english

From what i have heard he speaks pretty good English - i can understand him which is more than i can do for certain players!

Carito_90
05-31-2004, 12:21 AM
LMAO! :lol:

Carito_90
05-31-2004, 12:38 AM
Well Ferrero can speak.. yes, he makes lots of grammar mistakes but still, he can speak.. and damn he can say you know :lol:


JCap. said 'you know' 36 times in the friday interview. That's an improovement! :lol:

Devotee
05-31-2004, 12:42 AM
Kafelnikov used to say "you know" alot.

Lee
05-31-2004, 01:04 AM
Once, I counted three 'you know' in one sentence by JCF. And that sentence has less than 20 words. :rolleyes:

Leo
05-31-2004, 01:08 AM
Justine is certainly guilty of over-using the phrase "for sure." :rolleyes: :lol:

Pete Sampras and Kim Clijsters say "you know" alot, no?

Deboogle!.
05-31-2004, 01:11 AM
Yes, on the women's side I think Kim and Jen take the cake, they'd have to battle it out for sure. I think once a few days ago in one of Jen's interviews I counted "you know" like 16 times in one answer.

Carito_90
05-31-2004, 01:15 AM
I think once a few days ago in one of Jen's interviews I counted "you know" like 16 times in one answer.

Aww we're moving backwards JCap!


Oh i think i counted 30 'you know' from Ferrero in 6 answers :lol:

Deboogle!.
05-31-2004, 01:56 AM
Oops not 16, 13!
----
Q. You still have a final to play, but is this a huge load, to get one of the Williamses off your back - for a while anyway?

JENNIFER CAPRIATI: Yeah. I mean, of course. It's just, you know, a player that's been No. 1 in the world and she's, you know, "the one to beat." I've lost to her, you know, so many times in a row. So she's one of the girls that would be, you know, a lot off the back if I would be able to win, you know. So it's just very, you know -- a personal victory for me. But, you know, it's just on to the next thing, you know. There's another job to do. You know, just gonna enjoy it later on, but, you know, it's just satisfaction of working hard and having it come out and playing well, you know. It really should be the same almost when you win or lose, but, you know, of course that's easy to say, you know...
----------
13 times!

BmxBandit
05-31-2004, 01:59 AM
Have you read Lisa Raymond's interviews?

And she supposedly graduated from college!

Ballbuster
05-31-2004, 02:37 AM
Have you read Lisa Raymond's interviews?

And she supposedly graduated from college!

HAH!! you think a college degree's worth something

Leo
05-31-2004, 03:40 AM
Oops not 16, 13!
----
Q. You still have a final to play, but is this a huge load, to get one of the Williamses off your back - for a while anyway?

JENNIFER CAPRIATI: Yeah. I mean, of course. It's just, you know, a player that's been No. 1 in the world and she's, you know, "the one to beat." I've lost to her, you know, so many times in a row. So she's one of the girls that would be, you know, a lot off the back if I would be able to win, you know. So it's just very, you know -- a personal victory for me. But, you know, it's just on to the next thing, you know. There's another job to do. You know, just gonna enjoy it later on, but, you know, it's just satisfaction of working hard and having it come out and playing well, you know. It really should be the same almost when you win or lose, but, you know, of course that's easy to say, you know...
----------
13 times!

Unreal! :lol:

gina_
05-31-2004, 04:00 AM
Juan Carlos Ferrero....I find it endearing lol

Kristen
05-31-2004, 08:32 AM
Mark Philippoussis... Jelena Dokic... Teach them some synonyms people!

kartveteran
05-31-2004, 09:19 AM
Completely out of boredom, i decided to check the real statistics behind this prestigious "you know"-saying championship...

Women interviews at Wimbledon 2003:
Some top players:
Henin: 5/7 (= 5 times "you know" in 7 answers)
V.Williams: 17/55
S.Williams: 11/43

Not bad, but now the real final match:

All Wimbledon 2003 interviews from Capriati and Clijsters:
Capriati: 20/18 - 21/28 - 18/20 - 23/22 - 41/19 --> total: 123/107
Clijsters: 19/13 - 9/4 - 14/8 - 9/9 - 41/13 - 31/8 --> total: 123/55
Good run from Capriati, but definitely a glorious win for Kim Clijsters!!!

Now the men:

Some random players at Wimbledon 2003:
Schalken: 0/8
Bjorkman: 2/6
Popp: 0/9
Ferrero: 13/14
Nalbandian: 1/23
Grosjean: 14/18
Apart from Ferrero and Grosjean, these players were really non-contenders. :unsure:

Now, some players that are pretty good at this game, but just failed to reach the final match:
Roddick: Wim2003: 5/7 - 41/35 RG2004: 60/43 --> 105/85
Agassi: 14/19 - 23/19 --> 37/38
Philippoussis: 34/28 - 36/26 - 29/25 --> 99/79

The 2 finalists of this game are: Tim Henman and Roger Federer

Wimbledon 2003:
Henman: 40/27 - 41/28 - 28/25 - 39/30 - 43/21 --> 191/131
Federer: 35/7 - 17/12 - 10/5 - 78/20 - 94/21(!) --> 234/65

So, apparently Roger Federer didn't only dominate Wimbledon 2003 with his gameplay, but also with his godlike "you know"-saying skills! You should really check out that post-final match interview...

But before handing the "you know"-trophy over to Federer, we should take a last look at the Roland Garros 2004 stats:

Federer: 28/18 - 25/17 --> 53/35
Henman: 52/26 - 61/16 --> 113/42

Interesting huh? Henman is seriously trying to get a revenge for that Wimbledon loss... :-) Federer is really losing his legacy on this RG2004 tournament... :)

drf716
05-31-2004, 09:29 AM
how'd you research that kart?

Lalitha
05-31-2004, 09:44 AM
You know, what would any player do without the words 'you know' , you know when you know, you know. hehee

I guess its not only the players whose language is other than English, but players from an English speaking country as well. Eg. Henman, Capriati

Corey Feldman
05-31-2004, 09:46 AM
Justine is certainly guilty of over-using the phrase "for sure." :rolleyes: :lol:

Pete Sampras and Kim Clijsters say "you know" alot, no?

yeh and henin also with her "Im so appee"

lot of frenchies (and her) say that infact

Corey Feldman
05-31-2004, 09:48 AM
or rusedski and his "well definetaly!!" starting every sentance, pfff canadian lingo :)

Corey Feldman
05-31-2004, 09:48 AM
nalbandian with his "unbelieable"

ok i'll stop :)

Vass
05-31-2004, 09:49 AM
Marat isn't quilty of this, but he has a nasty habbit of stooping in the middle of an anser, looking for words. He doesn't talk for 5 seconds, swaying his hands in every possible direction, and then continues with a rephrased sentance.

Pink Panther
05-31-2004, 09:58 AM
Roddick: Wim2003: 5/7 - 41/35 RG2004: 60/43 --> 105/85
Agassi: 14/19 - 23/19 --> 37/38
Philippoussis: 34/28 - 36/26 - 29/25 --> 99/79
Henman: 40/27 - 41/28 - 28/25 - 39/30 - 43/21 --> 191/131

Interesting how it is the native English speakers who top the list. But I find "you knows" slightly more tolerable than "ums" and "uhs". :D

kartveteran
05-31-2004, 10:36 AM
I also noticed it's mainly native english speakers who do this. Maybe some people who don't have english as their native language don't use that phrase, because they never learnt to do so at school or because a similar phrase doesn't exist in their own language.
However, the fact that Kim Clijsters and Roger Federer are also up there means it's definitely not a native-english-speaker-only thing.

Btw, I checked those stats by taking some post-match interviews from the Wimbledon 2003 and Roland Garros 2004 websites. I copied the text to MSWord, and let it count how often the phrase "you know" occurred in the text.
The players I picked were just random, or based on the names that were mentioned here. So, it's possible other players exist who use "you know" even more.

Buddy
05-31-2004, 10:50 AM
I really wonder... I think all the "you know" is giving the players time to answer a question which will not be wrongly quoted or certain things which they are not suppose to say...

I heard they got quite a restriction of things they cannot discuss and rather than fall into the trap of saying the wrong things they gotta "you know" all the way to buy them time and answer the questions the best they can..

I bet all of them speak fluent English out of the microphone when they talk to fellow tennis players...cos they dun have to worry about saying the wrong things...

Marine
05-31-2004, 10:58 AM
lot of frenchies say that infact

True. Sebastien Grosjean mainly, because he needs to think to what he's going to say after "you know...euhhhhhhhhh..." :p

skaya
05-31-2004, 03:27 PM
definitely Kim Clijsters ;) ;) ;)
:worship: :worship: :worship:

:devil: :devil: :devil:

Yashirobai
05-31-2004, 03:38 PM
JCF vocabulary: "you know", "pression", "solid". ;)

User ID 4783
05-31-2004, 04:23 PM
Kim Clijsters, and she always tries to speak quickly

Leo
05-31-2004, 04:51 PM
Completely out of boredom, i decided to check the real statistics behind this prestigious "you know"-saying championship...

Women interviews at Wimbledon 2003:
Some top players:
Henin: 5/7 (= 5 times "you know" in 7 answers)
V.Williams: 17/55
S.Williams: 11/43

Not bad, but now the real final match:

All Wimbledon 2003 interviews from Capriati and Clijsters:
Capriati: 20/18 - 21/28 - 18/20 - 23/22 - 41/19 --> total: 123/107
Clijsters: 19/13 - 9/4 - 14/8 - 9/9 - 41/13 - 31/8 --> total: 123/55
Good run from Capriati, but definitely a glorious win for Kim Clijsters!!!

Now the men:

Some random players at Wimbledon 2003:
Schalken: 0/8
Bjorkman: 2/6
Popp: 0/9
Ferrero: 13/14
Nalbandian: 1/23
Grosjean: 14/18
Apart from Ferrero and Grosjean, these players were really non-contenders. :unsure:

Now, some players that are pretty good at this game, but just failed to reach the final match:
Roddick: Wim2003: 5/7 - 41/35 RG2004: 60/43 --> 105/85
Agassi: 14/19 - 23/19 --> 37/38
Philippoussis: 34/28 - 36/26 - 29/25 --> 99/79

The 2 finalists of this game are: Tim Henman and Roger Federer

Wimbledon 2003:
Henman: 40/27 - 41/28 - 28/25 - 39/30 - 43/21 --> 191/131
Federer: 35/7 - 17/12 - 10/5 - 78/20 - 94/21(!) --> 234/65

So, apparently Roger Federer didn't only dominate Wimbledon 2003 with his gameplay, but also with his godlike "you know"-saying skills! You should really check out that post-final match interview...

But before handing the "you know"-trophy over to Federer, we should take a last look at the Roland Garros 2004 stats:

Federer: 28/18 - 25/17 --> 53/35
Henman: 52/26 - 61/16 --> 113/42

Interesting huh? Henman is seriously trying to get a revenge for that Wimbledon loss... :-) Federer is really losing his legacy on this RG2004 tournament... :)

You rock my world! This is awesome. :worship: :lol:

Leo
05-31-2004, 04:53 PM
JCF vocabulary: "you know", "pression", "solid". ;)

Don't forget "tennistically" (a word I use quite often now :D) and "base of the line" ;)

Leo
05-31-2004, 05:08 PM
For all those who were interested in viewing Roger's masterful and dominant performance, here you go...

Roger Federer - 2003 Gentlemen's Singles Champion
Sunday, July 6, 2003


R. FEDERER/M. Philippoussis

7-6, 6-2, 7-6

MODERATOR: Ladies and gentlemen, we'll start off with English questions for the Wimbledon Champion, please.

Q. How does the reality live up to the dream?

ROGER FEDERER: Oh, you know, like I said on the court, for me this is the best ever, you know. It was my most important match in my life, you know, and already the semifinal was maybe the most important.

So that I didn't lose a set, you know, in these two matches and played so well and I kept my level up, you know, is just absolute dream.

And then in the end, you know, to lift the trophy is something you don't expect, you know. But when it happens, it's, for me, very tough with the emotions.

Q. The tears, Roger, where did they come from? What was going through your mind?

ROGER FEDERER: They come from Switzerland (laughter).

No, I don't know, I've cried, you know, a few times on big occasions. Somehow, in the first moment, I don't think I will, but then I just can't keep, you know, keep it like this.

So, you know, as I said, this tournament means so much to me, and I've had great experiences in '98 junior victory, then 2001 when I beat Sampras, and now this, you know.

So this is just something for me what I cannot understand yet, you know. Because it's just -- it's too good.

Q. Is there anybody you'd like to dedicate this victory to?

ROGER FEDERER: You guys know each other, huh? (Laughter).

I would like to just thank everybody who has always helped me, you know. I don't want to give this to one person because this is -- it's too big of a victory. And everybody who has helped me throughout my career, you know, going from coaches to friends to condition trainers to stringers to masseurs, just everybody who has been involved in my game. I would like to -- you know, this is something back to them also, you know.

But in the end, you know, it's also my victory and I enjoy it as much as I can.

Q. In Poland we have two major tournaments in coastal towns. Juan Carlos Ferrero is coming this year. Will you come, too?

ROGER FEDERER: Where is it? Excuse me.

Q. In Poland.

ROGER FEDERER: No, I'm not thinking about it yet, you know (laughter).

Q. You will be most welcome.

ROGER FEDERER: Okay, thank you. But you've got to send me an invitation, I don't know (smiling).

Q. You just won the most important tournament in the world. This undoubtedly wipes out some of the disappointments of the last couple years, tournaments you've gone far in, a Masters tournament you lost to Hewitt, Al Costa. At any time in the last two years, when those disappointments came along, was there any self-doubt that you would ever arrive at this moment?

ROGER FEDERER: Uhm... Doubt, you know, there is no guarantee for nothing, you know. And, you know, I was -- I knew I had the game, you know. And, for me, it was somehow first important that I could prove it maybe on the smaller events. This is also really where I picked up, you know. I won titles - now, you know, a lot. It's already my fifth this year. I thought, "This is gonna bring me far in the Grand Slams, you know, just to play a lot of matches and to play a lot of finals," because finals is different -- it's just different, you know, mentally.

So I've always believed, but then in the end when it happens, you know, you don't think that it is possible, you know. But now it has happened, and I guess I'm just gonna have some time, you know, to look back and just enjoy this moment.

Q. You talked about beating Pete Sampras. Do you think now you can emulate him at Wimbledon?

ROGER FEDERER: Oh, this is, you know, one of his seven, you know. I'm so far away, you know. I'm just happy, you know, to be on the board, you know. It's so nice, if I look at all the players who have won here, you know, a lot have been idols to me. Just to be on the board with Borg and these people, it's just nice, you know, to be a part of history at Wimbledon, you know - and in Grand Slams in general, you know.

And, you know, it's incredible.

Q. Was there any specific thought that triggered your emotion at the end? You seemed happy and controlled, then you seemed to have felt a rush of emotion. Was it just an accumulation of things or just a particular thought?

ROGER FEDERER: You know, when he hits the passing -- the return, you think, "Oh, it's gonna be a tough volley, you know," then it stays in the net, you know.

And you don't really know what to do in the first moment, you know? I just knew I'm gonna go down on the floor, you know, and enjoy it, you know, and see what happens, you know.

Maybe - hopefully - I don't cry, you know, but... (Laughter).

It's kind of difficult in such a big match and in such an unbelievable stadium, you know, where the people are so nice.

Q. I just wondered if you saw somebody or something went through your mind that actually meant you'd lost the battle? It's not a battle to win, anyway, but when your emotion came, did one particular thought come into your head, or did you see something or think something?

ROGER FEDERER: What did I think about? You know, it's just I cannot believe it, you know? This is really what went through my mind the first moment when I sat down on my chair, then just quick flashback. You don't have much time, you know.

But in the first moment, you know...

Then you see the trophy, you know, and it's so beautiful. Gold. You know, you don't have golden trophies very often (laughter). Just the way, you know, when you look at it and when you hold it, is something you've always dreamed of.

So right then, you feel like, you know, "Am I dreaming? This is true right now?" You know.

Q. You're still very young, but you must have read and heard so many times commentators say that, you know, "Your nerve is gone on the big occasion," "When are you going to break through on the big occasion?" Do you feel, as well as the great sort of joy, do you feel a sense of relief that now you've shown everybody, "Yes, I can win one of the big ones"?

ROGER FEDERER: Yes, I said this already when I won my quarters almost, when I won my semis, and now after I won my finals. I proved it to everybody, you know.

It is a big relief to me because there was pressure from all the sides, you know, also from myself. I wanted to do better in Slams, you know.

But it just -- I guess you need a little luck, you know, like I had with my back, and kind of sneak through that round, you know.

So when I was playing that round, I didn't think, you know, I'd ever hold a trophy. So one week -- not even a week later, I'm holding it. So it's very tough still for me to just think it.

Q. I know you didn't want to pick out anybody in particular to dedicate it to, but the memory of Peter Carter, could you talk about him and what he did for you?

ROGER FEDERER: I mean, he's definitely included, you know. He's been one of my most important people in my career. So definitely also he's included in this circle, you know. That's for sure, you know.

And I guess we would have had a big party together, you know, if he was still here.

Q. You said at the moment of your triumph when you were sitting down you were flashing back. What were you flashing back on?

ROGER FEDERER: How is it to be in the finals, you know, and win in straight sets. And, you know, it's just totally different feeling. I was very nervous when I walked on the court, you know. It was different.

And after just -- because you live during the match, and you have strong emotions, you know, but you don't want to get too overexcited, you know. My body's totally flat now, you know. I cannot move anymore. I'm totally exhausted, just because of the tension out there, you know.

"I really hope that I can do this in three," you know, after I won the second set.

Q. How much trouble were you in in the match against Lopez?

ROGER FEDERER: Oh, I was... Did you see the match or not?

Q. No, not all of it.

ROGER FEDERER: I'm telling you, go and get a tape, because... (Laughter).

Because I was really -- I was really in big pain, you know. I was struggling to serve, I was struggling to return. I couldn't even really sit down because I was hurting so much. Then I called the trainer after two games and he gave me painkillers, he gave me a massage on my back, you know, with warm cream.

And I told myself, "If this continues for a few more games, and I realized that this guy was just kicking my ass, it's not worth playing," you know.

But somehow I stayed in the match and it got a little bit better. Then I kind of won that first set, which was important.

Q. With the Swiss winning the America's Cup, now you've won Wimbledon, what's left for you?

ROGER FEDERER: The end, what is that?

Q. The Swiss have won the America's Cup. You've won Wimbledon. What's next for the Swiss?

ROGER FEDERER: Hmm... You know, yeah, I also believe that Swiss sports is doing well, you know. They've proved it.

At one stage I was thinking about, you know, America's Cup actually because I saw them and, you know, they were 3-love ahead and everybody said they were racing away, you know. Same with me, when I was up two sets to love, I thought, "Just take it, you know, and race away, you know..." (Smiling).

Tennis in Switzerland, I think, is doing quite well. I've only helped this by winning this title.

Q. How will you celebrate tonight?

ROGER FEDERER: How? There's a lot of friends here, family members as well, and we gonna go to the official dinner, something I've always wanted to do. Because in '98, when I won the Juniors I was invited, but we decided, Peter Carter and myself, we said, "Oh, I got my first wildcard in Gstaad, I know I got to prepare well."

So I still regret that, you know, in a way. But now that's okay because I can live through that official dinner again.

Q. It must disappoint you Peter Carter isn't here to witness this?

ROGER FEDERER: Oh, for sure. But I hope he sees it from somewhere, you know...

would be a dream.

Q. Must be a tremendous thing to win a Grand Slam at any stage. Is there something special, do you think, that the first one has come here?

ROGER FEDERER: Oh, yeah, you know. People were always asking me, because I'm an all-around player that can play on any surface - I've won this year alone already titles on all surfaces, you know - so people were asking me, "Which Grand Slam do you think you have the best chance," you know.

After the loss of last year, I started saying, "You know, maybe Australian Open and US Open, I don't know."

Now, to win Wimbledon as a first Grand Slam, you know, obviously now I don't hope it's gonna be my last, you know, but it is, it's definitely for me the best one to win. I'm so happy.

Q. You've won Wimbledon, which is a pretty good tournament. But when are you ever going to win Basel?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah (laughter). I haven't won that one yet, huh? Maybe this year, who knows (smiling).

~~~~~~

(You can tell I'm bored today ;))

Lee
05-31-2004, 07:39 PM
:worship: Leo

jrm
06-01-2004, 12:20 AM
CAPRIATI - i wonder if she has ever seen or dare i say opened any book?

Havok
06-01-2004, 12:35 AM
OMFG:retard::scared: what's up with the you knows everywhere :bolt:

kiro
06-01-2004, 02:42 AM
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah (laughter). I haven't won that one yet, huh? Maybe this year, who knows (smiling).



So no "you know" this time :angel:

Richard Cranium
06-01-2004, 04:09 AM
Really, you know I am very proud, you know to receive this award for the most "you knows" ever used in interviews, and with this award, you know I will be able to build on and improve you know my performances in interviews with more "you knows" than you will ever know, you know.

Lynne
06-01-2004, 09:43 AM
JC Ferrero, Jennifer Capriati and Kim Clijsters definitely love saying "you know"!!
And of course Justine goes with "for sure".. And I heard Roger saying " for sure" in an interview and I was like: That sounds familiar!! :)

sigmagirl91
06-02-2004, 01:15 AM
And not just the "you know", but the "i mean" gets on my last nerve as well...

Leo
06-02-2004, 01:32 AM
CAPRIATI - i wonder if she has ever seen or dare i say opened any book?
I would say the same for her mother. They interviewed her today on ESPN and she sounded like a complete ditz. She just kept saying the same thing over and over. "She's going to try her best, you know."

Carito_90
06-02-2004, 01:48 AM
JCF vocabulary: "you know", "pression", "solid".

Don't forget "tennistically" (a word I use quite often now ) and "base of the line"


Oh and he also uses "so" for everything. "He played so well" "he was so solid" "the court was so fast"... he can't help it,, he doesn't even use the word "too" lmao!

Really, you know I am very proud, you know to receive this award for the most "you knows" ever used in interviews, and with this award, you know I will be able to build on and improve you know my performances in interviews with more "you knows" than you will ever know, you know.

:haha: :haha: :haha:

jole
06-02-2004, 02:39 AM
I loved it when Mal Washington ended the interview with Capriati's mother with, "Thanks, and try to not be so nervous next time."

I realize she has the right to be nervous about the match, but she was acting like a deer in the headlights!

Zetlandsk
06-02-2004, 02:48 AM
Really, you know I am very proud, you know to receive this award for the most "you knows" ever used in interviews, and with this award, you know I will be able to build on and improve you know my performances in interviews with more "you knows" than you will ever know, you know.

Congratulations you know on winning this award, and you know all those hours in speech classes perfected the you know technique and you know you were more successful, but you know next year, will be a different story, you know.

Bee
06-03-2004, 09:14 AM
Oh dear, you know, why isn't the "c'mon" kid here, you know, in this list?
It's Lleyton Hewitt of course ...

Ferrero Forever
07-10-2004, 10:00 AM
any true ferrero fan has to admit that he does say you know sooooooooooooooooo many times in an interview. He starts, finishes his sentences with you know, and uses it in between sentences as well. but he does speak very good english though. I agree, he has a vocabulary only consisting of you know, pression, base of the line, tennistically and tennis is like this. but every time he says any of these terms (especially base of the line) i laugh.

Aleksa's Laydee
07-10-2004, 05:52 PM
a brit that says it alot... alex bogdanovic... bless :kiss:

Iza
07-10-2004, 07:53 PM
Ferrero. His 'you knows' are the best :lol:

Leo
07-10-2004, 08:55 PM
any true ferrero fan has to admit that he does say you know sooooooooooooooooo many times in an interview. He starts, finishes his sentences with you know, and uses it in between sentences as well. but he does speak very good english though. I agree, he has a vocabulary only consisting of you know, pression, base of the line, tennistically and tennis is like this. but every time he says any of these terms (especially base of the line) i laugh.

He also likes to answer with "It's easy to say" or "It's not easy/difficult to say" :lol:

MissPovaFan
07-10-2004, 09:32 PM
Has Greg Rusedski with his "Well Definitely" been mentioned? :p

YoursTruly
07-11-2004, 05:18 AM
Jennifer Capriati. I can't even think of anyone else ATP or WTA because she is THE ultimate "you know-er"
Read all her press exerpts in past tournaments and watch for the future tournaments and US Open! :)

davor_suker
07-11-2004, 05:55 AM
Goran Ivanisevic said it quite a bit

FrenchLouise
07-12-2004, 05:48 PM
I suppose this has been said before on the thread but the sentence I hear all the time is "for sure". I even had to check in the dictionary because I doubted it was English.

Sammy
07-13-2004, 12:35 AM
In this interview Seb says 'you know' 18 times.

SEBASTIEN GROSJEAN

THE MODERATOR: Questions for Sebastien.
Q. What was the key to the match today?
SEBASTIEN GROSJEAN: My serve maybe. You know, I was serving very well for almost two sets, and after, you know, I didn't have a good percentage in my first serve. Guillermo played more aggressive than me. That was maybe the key, you know, my serve.

Q. Was fatigue at all a factor in the last set?
SEBASTIEN GROSJEAN: No, no fatigue. I mean, he was playing better and better, moving very well. You know, I didn't have a short ball after my first serve. So I was less aggressive in the third set than in the two first.

Q. This is the first time you played him. What do you like about his game? What does he do well?
SEBASTIEN GROSJEAN: He's moving very well. He has a really good backhand. I think he has a better backhand than forehand - especially down the line. You know, he's fight very well, moving very well. If you give him a short ball, you know, he can be aggressive, as well.

Q. You're part of almost a new breed of player, it seems, very versatile tennis being played by people like yourself, Roger, others. A few years the thinking was that the game was going to be dominated by big guys banging the ball around. Can you comment why this development has happened now?
SEBASTIEN GROSJEAN: I think is good, you know, to see different style of the game. Everybody, you know, can play well and win big events. So I think it's good for the game, for the public, as well, to see different styles.
You know, but sometimes better for the public to see different games against.

Q. Was it something you worked on consciously? Did you feel you needed all these tools or was it just that you had all these tools and you kept practicing and they got better and better?
SEBASTIEN GROSJEAN: No, you know, you have to practice. But it was my way, you know, I was playing when I was young. So I keep practicing that way and try to improve, you know, my serve, my game more aggressive, I would say.
But you have to keep, you know, practicing the way you think is good for you.

Q. I saw Coria play Max Mirnyi, big guy, big serve. He handled that well. He handled your power, too. What makes him able to handle these bigger players? Is it just his speed?
SEBASTIEN GROSJEAN: I think he's returning very well. He has a good return. And you have always to play one more shot, always put the ball, you know, back when he's in defense. So that's tough. The other guy, you have always one more shot to finish the point. So it's never easy.
You know, when he has an opportunity, he can, you know, hit the ball hard and come to the net, as well. He can play, you know, from the both side.

Q. You had some tough times in recent months with injuries. How are you feeling now? How do you feel compared to two years ago when you had the big year and reached the final of the Masters?
SEBASTIEN GROSJEAN: I feel pretty good. Unfortunately, I was injured at the Australian Open again. I took like five weeks off. You know, I tried to play maybe less tournament than I used to play, like around 18, 20, and tried to play a hundred percent each tournament I would play.
No, I feel pretty good. I'm really happy to play without injury.

Q. What would be your goal for this year?
SEBASTIEN GROSJEAN: French Open, of course, yeah. Win the French (smiling).

FastScripts by ASAP Sports...

Lee
07-13-2004, 02:53 AM
In this interview Seb says 'you know' 18 times.


Nothing compare to JCap or JCF. I remembered they had about 7-10 'you know' in one answer. And had 3 'you know' in just one sentence.

I'm too lazy to dig up the interview though :p

Lalitha
07-13-2004, 06:50 AM
JCF vocabulary: "you know", "pression", "solid". ;)

One more - "anyways"

LCeh
08-05-2004, 04:46 AM
This is not "you know", but "no" instead... ;)

Q. Maybe a little inside medical update on Kim's wrist, is she able to play at all?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No, she can only hit forehands.

Q. She's not even hitting?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No, she hits some forehands now and then.

Q. She have any idea when she might play?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No. Just I think, you know, pretty much after the US Open some time hopefully. But, yeah, depends every week.

Q. Any wedding plans yet?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No.

Q. Not that you're going to tell us, or not at all?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No, no.

Q. He doesn't have to tell us where or when.

LLEYTON HEWITT: No (smiling).

Q. Continent?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No (smiling).

Tennis Fool
08-05-2004, 05:01 AM
Fed wins hands down. I can barely get through his interviews anymore :o

Corey Feldman
08-05-2004, 05:02 AM
Grosjean
"you know ,im pretty apee"

Tennis Fool
08-05-2004, 05:05 AM
Try to read this without screaming :lol:

Roger Federer - August 1

(partial transcript)

Q. Okay Roger has won ten finals in a row going back to last year. He wins his ATP best eight title this season and he has also won now 23 matches in a row and the first player to win consecutive titles on grass, clay and hard since Bjorn Borg in 1979. All right, questions for Roger?

Q. Roger, that was a fantastic performance far better than anything else you have done throughout the week. What enabled you to do it, is it the adrenaline or just your experience of the big finals or what?

A. Well it is tough to, you know, push a button and say, okay, here is the final let me play well. You know, it doesn't come automatic. Umm, you have to work at it, you know, I think the reason why I played well today was because I was struggling throughout the week, you know. I didn't play my best throughout the week but I still kept on winning. And I think, you know, when it came to the finals I knew that, I think, there is better left in me. So I really, umm, could actually turn up the up the gear and I had to because against Andy you have to, he is a great player.

Q. You listen the all the accomplishments that you have had, you know, the three different surfaces, the streak you are on, does it ever amaze you just how much you have been able to accomplish over the last little while?

A. Well definitely, you know, sometimes I get the feeling that people think it is normal or that I almost have to excuse myself for losing a set against Johansson, you know, I think it is something very difficult to do, you know, to keep all those streaks going you know, if I would have lost today a lot of streaks would have been broken. You know, I wouldn't have had the chance to win the three surfaces, the ten finals would have been broken, you know, and the winning streak would have been over. So, you know, I am very glad to have one this match especially against, you know, the second best player in the world. So I knew what this match was all about.

Q. Roger, 14 aces today, where did you find the reserve to come up with so many aces? Were you surprised ‑‑

A. Well that was the one thing I was doing well this week, you know, serving well. Especially when I had to, that saved a lot of trouble for me this whole week.

Q. Roger, you obviously the three wins on three different surfaces, the last player to do that was Bjorn Borg, I heard you say that that is somebody that you looked up to, does it give you exa meaning to know that now you are alongside Bjorn?

A. It is nice. That is the first thing I was really proud about also when I won Wimbledon for the first time, you know, to be side‑by‑side with Bjorn Borg. You know, even though he has won it many more times but at least, you know, I have won it once. But obviously I didn't know about this streak a few days or a few weeks ago, but he was the last player to do so. I think everyone on the tour knows how difficult it is to actually just win, you know, a few surfaces in one year and I have done it all back to back so that's, that is incredible. And, you know, he wasn't my hero when I was growing up, you know, because he was before my time. But I was lucky enough to meet him and to speak to him a little bit and I know a lot of stories through Peter Lungdren. So, you know, I really like him very much. I hope I can meet him again and chat about it because this is ‑‑ these are history books and these mean a lot to me.

Q. Roger, can you remember, does it happen very often love‑40 and then you save three break points all with aces, I mean, in a big situation like that, you ever

A. Well I remember, you know, serving aces three in a row on a few occasions. But I don't know if I have done on break points, this is up to you to find out, I think so, umm. But, I don't remember a match where it happened. So. I was definitely the right time, you know, to come up with big serves because up until that love‑40 I don't remember making a first serve, you know, in that game and it came at the right time. It was good luck in the game.

Q. Do you have any idea how you did it?

A. Well like I said this whole week my serve has been good. I could rely on it and I knew that if I make the first ace or a first good serve then, you know, you have to feel the groove and, you know, to take the confidence but you hit a second and you think oh, man, there is one more to go. So it is tough, but, my serve was there when I needed it this whole week and most important it was here in the finals and never been broken, so, against Andy and that is a good effort because I have the feeling he is returning much better than in past and, you know, he makes you work hard so, it is good.

Q. Roger, one of the things that struck me was your composure and consistency out there. What do you do to keep your head clear?

A. I didn't, I missed the beginning.

Q. Just how composed and how consistent you are out there. What is your head space like, how do you train yourself?

A. Well it is all through experience. I was very, I would say, wild before on the court. It took me a long time, you know, actually to get, to find peace with myself because I was, I would get so frustrated and so disappointed and so sad about my game sometimes. Now I can handle it. If I miss shots, you know, I say okay, I hope the next one goes better. If it goes bad again, I hope the next one goes better. So I can just always see something positive in my game especially now that, you know, I don't have to think or hope too much about my serve because it comes very naturally and good. In the paste, you know, I always hope my first serve comes because if my serve doesn't work, I have got nothing else. That is the way I felt a little bit a few years ago. And this it is all a combination that I could, you know, get the mental strength, the physical strength, you know, the whole game plan. I start to understand tennis better and better, and that makes me much more calm inside and especially on big occasions now. I went through a lot of them lately so I am used to it.

Q. Roger, were you forced to make any major adjustments during the match or is it safe to say you executed fully you game plan going in?

A. Well, you know, first you have to get the ball back on his serve. Then before that, I first have to focus on my own serve so I can stay level with him and then you know take chances. I missed a few, you know, in the beginning and suddenly, you know, he had huge chance at love‑40. But I really have to say I didn't have change much of my game plan. It is what I expected, I knew he is not going to come out hitting full swing like in Wimbledon, because I thought about it. You can't play that tennis he played in Wimbledon on a hard court or on a clay court, you have to ‑‑ and so I thought that he would play much more patient because this is the way he played me in Montreal last year. You know, stood very far back on the return and, you know, made me go into longer rallies and that is exactly what I did and that is what I've actually was looking forward to. So I was prepared for that and so I didn't had to change my game plan.

Q. You have had great success against him, you have 7‑1 lifetime. Do you think if somebody is going to beat you he has probably got the best chance of anyone to be able to do that?

A. Well he hasn't beaten me this year, you know. But so you have to ask the other plays how they did it, you know, the ones he who beat me, there is only a few. But I feel like every time I step on the court, you know, there is a chance I might lose against – not against anybody but especially against Andy because everybody knows, you know, he has got a lot of strengths in his game more and more. His forehand has always been good, his backhand is more consistent, his serve, you know, is always a weapon. So he is a tough player but, you know, I would think it is wrong if we with just speak about me and him. You know, because there is a lot of lot of other great players around. And, you know, there has been players dominating the clay court season where we haven't been that dominant. And so we will see what after the US open if you can still keep up, you know, talking about me and Andy.

Q. Roger, he came into the net a lot. I think probably more than usual, was that an unexpected thing for you and does it suggest –

A. He did, you mean?

Q. He did, yes, he came into the net –

A. No, he always plays like this against me because I allow him to do so because, you know, I just chip back my return so. Umm, he always gets ‑‑ he can always run around his backhand, he can always put me on back foot, and if he doesn't come in, you know, then he has got no clue about tennis so. But, you know, he did it right and, yeah, he puts me under lot of pressure with his forehand so I am not surprised at all. Because if you look at all the matches we have played, they have have always been quite similar, you know, in that respect.

Q. Roger, Andy said I thought I served really badly until I looked at the stat sheet and saw 67 percent. Is that a tribute to your return of serve that he thought he served badly?

A. Well I had the feeling he wasn't serving as hard as in Wimbledon. In Wimbledon I had the feeling it was just incredible how hard he was hitting the ball. Obviously we were on grass but still, I thought that first serve really was very difficult to control, you know, I had to sometimes didn't even have to time really change my grip, you know, (inaudible) one grip to return and that was not the case today. Umm, but, you know, that is how it goes. There is days where we serve better, there is some where I have absolutely no clue what is going on. And important was, you know, to always get the ball back against him that is how I look at it. You know, not to actually return it hard and deep and try to hit winners off it, you know, because I think that would be wrong approach with my game and that has worked well for me and I have always sticked to that game plan since I have really dominated him in Wimbledon last year and since I haven't been changing my game plan too much.

Q. Roger, is your next big goal to win a gold meddle in Athens?

A. Well, I hope, you know, I will play well. A medal is a goal for me, gold would be what I would hope for, but, again, you know it is knock out system. Like in every other tennis tournament, that is extremely difficult, you know, to maintain that level of play all the time and I have already won eight tournaments you know, I think these days in men's tennis that is very difficult to to do so that would be my ninth or tenth see about Cincinnati. But I am not planning on winning the gold medal. I go there and give my best and if there is a medal in it I am happy, if there a gold I come back home to Switzerland a hero, so we will see what happens.

Q. Roger, you said on the court right after the match that you were exhausted. Can you expand on that a little bit?

A. Well exhausted. The tournament is over, you know, I am relieved, I am happy, you know, everything is over and I can relax for a day.

Q. Is it just the one tournament that has wiped you out or you are still feeling the lag effect, you talked a little bit about your mental fatigue this week?

A. I am very surprise, I honestly do. Because I came here, and I was like, I hope I can get through the early rounds and then, you know, I can get my feel back for the game because I was very tired I wasn't sure if I should come here at all or to Cincinnati because if I thought if I keep this pace up, you know, by playing all the time, you know, I might overdo it at one stage and I get sick like, like in ‑‑ when I was in Miami you know after I won Indian Wells. But when I started practicing and I started to feel like, no, I am ready to go and also if Toronto goes well, you know, I am also fine for Cincinnati. So I play Cincinnati and try to do my best there. Because before and after the Olympics we still have a week, you know, so that is okay.

Q. Roger, you mentioned the possibility you are thinking about coming to Toronto, when did you sort of finally make up your mind or were you think about possibly not playing in both Toronto and Cincinnati?

A. That is what I just said. That is what I just said, yeah. That when I was on holiday I felt so good, you know, I didn't want to leave that place, so. I was ‑‑ I spoke to my, you know, condition trainer and I asked him what do you think. He said well just, you know what, go there and, you know, actually try your best because you know they are big events and at the same time I also didn't want to give the other guys a chance, you know, to either catch up on me or, you know, just play a tournament without me there. And once I came back and I decided actually then to play Toronto Cincinnati a week before, and I decided to leave one or two days later than actually planned. And that gave me a few extra days back in Switzerland which were very important for me and. But at the same time I knew it is going the make it for difficult to win the first round. But once I got through it, you know, with the rain helped also a little bit. I took advantage of it, it was good.

LCeh
08-05-2004, 05:12 AM
If I counted correctly, there were 79 "you know"s in that transcript. :haha:

J. Corwin
08-05-2004, 07:53 AM
too funny :lol:

JCap is the queen when using both "you know" AND "I mean" ;)

Tennis-Engineer
09-03-2009, 06:11 PM
:lol: Roger still has this habbit in interviews.

Dini
09-03-2009, 06:34 PM
Federer wins hands down.

moon language
09-03-2009, 06:36 PM
Roddick and Sampras are both guilty of it.

jrm
09-03-2009, 06:45 PM
I was listening to Mirza when she was demolished by Pennetta - 'you know' was way too common :lol:

Lee
09-03-2009, 06:47 PM
Juan Carlos Ferrero

tennishero
09-03-2009, 09:25 PM
federer by far.

habibko
09-03-2009, 09:29 PM
Murray says it alot as well.

Burrow
09-03-2009, 09:33 PM
Federer says it a lot, I've noticed, dunno who else.

Forehander
09-03-2009, 09:40 PM
No one beats Federer in this department. But it has improved a little bit since 2004-2006

Horatio Caine
09-03-2009, 09:57 PM
Murray says it alot as well.

Yeah, seemingly every new sentence. :lol:

Wow, I started this thread 5.25 years ago! :eek: Nice use of the search engine there. ;)

Horatio Caine
09-19-2009, 10:11 PM
Like Karlovic's 78 ace record, Federer's 22 x SF Slam finishes, Nadal's winning streak on clay...this record surely won't be broken for some time. 28 'you knows' in a 2-minute interview, Mr. Andy Murray! :D

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tennis/8265107.stm


Can it be beaten? :eek:

Certinfy
09-19-2009, 10:14 PM
Fucking hell!!! 28 in 2 minutes :eek:

jonas
09-19-2009, 10:18 PM
29 that is.

Horatio Caine
09-19-2009, 10:23 PM
Fucking hell!!! 28 in 2 minutes :eek:

Funny thing is that he didn't even speak for 2 minutes...when you take out the interviewer and the couple of seconds pauses, he probably spoke for more like 90-100 seconds. Averaging approx. 1 'you know' every 3.5 seconds. :worship:

jonas
09-19-2009, 10:27 PM
:haha: Really impressive! 29 you know's in 90 seconds.
Way to go Andy!

federersforehand
09-19-2009, 11:25 PM
holy balls, federer GOAT of you knows? and a challenger to the throne in Murray is coming up the ranks, 29 in 90 is some hot streak! but can he do it when it matters?

ghostbear
09-19-2009, 11:38 PM
Fed's two favorite phrases:
- you know
- I mean

e.g.,
http://www.usopen.org/en_US/news/interviews/2009-09-14/200909131252827286093.html
- you know: 8 times
- I mean: 10 times

http://www.australianopen.com/en_AU/news/interviews/2009-02-01/200902011233411537875.html
- you know: 25 times
- I mean: 16 times

brent-o
09-20-2009, 04:15 AM
The most hilarious thing about Murray's 29 in 2 minutes record is that he's a native English speaker. I could understand if some of the players who weren't too comfortable with English yet say it a lot.

Stensland
09-20-2009, 04:26 AM
haas.

chammer44
09-20-2009, 04:55 AM
The most hilarious thing about Murray's 29 in 2 minutes record is that he's a native English speaker. I could understand if some of the players who weren't too comfortable with English yet say it a lot.

It's a very common hiccup for those untrained in public speaking.

I've had a few professors do it compulsively.

partygirl
09-20-2009, 05:25 AM
Roddick could rival Federer in this department for sure...i think they are his favorite words.