Marcelo Rios [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Marcelo Rios

the answer
09-27-2007, 02:21 PM
I was looking for some information on Marcelo Rios so I decided to search it on Wikipedia and look what I found.

Ríos' career has been marked by a number of controversies.

* He was fined US$10,000 for speeding during the 1998 Stuttgart tournament.
* At the 2000 Summer Olympics, he had been selected as Chile's standard-bearer for the opening ceremony, but refused to parade at the last minute, arguing that the Chilean Olympic Committee (Coch) had left his parents without promised tickets for the ceremony. Nicolás Massú took his place.
* In a confusing incident, he ran over his physical trainer, Manuel Astorga, with his jeep, leaving him gravely injured at the foot. Astorga was later fired as trainer.
* After a magazine published some photos of him dancing seductively with a woman at a Paris disco, his girlfriend Giuliana Sotela broke up with him. Later, during a Davis Cup press conference, he read a letter, asking Sotela for forgiveness. He ended the press conference in tears.
* He was accused by his second wife, Eugenia Larraín, of throwing her off of his car while visiting his daughter in Costa Rica. Larraín arrived to Santiago's airport in dramatic fashion, on a wheelchair and showing multiple bruises on her legs (he said those bruises were caused by falling while skiing).
* He was arrested in Rome in 2001 after he punched a taxi driver in the nose and then had a fight with the policemen arresting him.
* [B]In 2003, he urinated on a man in a La Serena bar's bathroom. He was later expelled from his hotel after being accused of swimming in the nude. ????
* In 2003 he and a friend were expelled from a Santiago bar after insulting other clients and being involved in a brawl with some waiters. Both were arrested and later released.
* His second wife, Eugenia Larraín, has said that he has undergone treatment for alcoholism.
* He reportedly told Monica Seles to move her "fat ass" while on a lunch queue, but he has denied this.
* During the Wimbledon tournament he commented that grass was for "cows and soccer" and not suitable for tennis play.
* He was disqualified from the 2000 Mercedes-Benz Cup tennis tournament in Los Angeles, California during a first round match with Gouichi Motomura of Japan and fined US$5,000 for saying "fuck you" to the chair umpire.
* He insulted a journalist under his breath during a post-match interview after she asked him whether he had Native American ancestry. :haha:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special:Search?search=marcelo+rios

Kitty de Sade
09-27-2007, 02:37 PM
Nobody will ever accuse Rios of being unoriginal and/or boring. In the eyes of many, however, he is as cuddly as a cactus.

He receives a lot of stick in the press sometimes, and I cannot speak for anyone else, but my friend and I ran into him on three separate occassions, and on all three, he was very nice. :)

Kolya
09-27-2007, 02:53 PM
He is a character.

Too bad he was weak mentally.

RagingLamb
09-27-2007, 02:53 PM
a true role model :yeah:

jonas
09-27-2007, 10:44 PM
Most overrated player ever.

Stgobaiano
09-27-2007, 11:01 PM
Genius:worship:


Funny that a Bjorkman fan said that....

cobalt60
09-27-2007, 11:04 PM
Nobody will ever accuse Rios of being unoriginal and/or boring. In the eyes of many, however, he is as cuddly as a cactus.

He receives a lot of stick in the press sometimes, and I cannot speak for anyone else, but my friend and I ran into him on three separate occassions, and on all three, he was very nice. :)

Doesn't have anything to do with the fact that you are gorgeous? Nah no way;)

Kitty de Sade
09-27-2007, 11:11 PM
Doesn't have anything to do with the fact that you are gorgeous? Nah no way;)

I'm a greasy Italian shrimp. I have no idea what you are talking about, Sue. :shrug:

Don't you go being an instigator, almost birthday girl. I'm telling the truth- he was a genuine person, despite your hint of "conditional friendliness." :p

cobalt60
09-27-2007, 11:15 PM
I'm a greasy Italian shrimp. I have no idea what you are talking about, Sue. :shrug:

Don't you go being an instigator, almost birthday girl. I'm telling the truth- he was a genuine person, despite your hint of "conditional friendliness." :p

Ok I believe you;) Glad to know sometimes tennis players have other stuff on their minds. :p

ChinoRios4Ever
09-28-2007, 12:35 AM
overrated my ass

thank u 4 all you genius :worship::worship::worship:

GonzoFed
09-28-2007, 01:03 AM
overrated my ass

thank u 4 all you genius :worship::worship::worship:

Agreed. However i'm still frustrated by the defeats against Moya (98) and Hrbaty (99) in RG. Those were his best chances to win a major (in the A0 IMHO he took advantage of a favourable draw, though the win against Enqvist was good).

ChinoRios4Ever
09-28-2007, 01:06 AM
Agreed. However i'm still frustrated by the defeats against Moya (98) and Hrbaty (99) in RG. Those were his best chances to win a major (in the A0 IMHO he took advantage of a favourable draw, though the win against Enqvist was good).

No. 1 without winning a GS is a big achievement, and also being No. 1 in Sampras' era...

in this clown era el Chino could be top 5 easily :wavey:

GonzoFed
09-28-2007, 01:12 AM
No. 1 without winning a GS is a big achievement, and also being No. 1 in Sampras' era...

in this clown era el Chino could be top 5 easily :wavey:

You seem to be a cool guy and countrymen, that's why i will not debate about your Riostardism. I have enough with some members of my family who believe he could defeat Federer now. :p

ChinoRios4Ever
09-28-2007, 01:21 AM
You seem to be a cool guy and countrymen, that's why i will not debate about your Riostardism. I have enough with some members of my family who believe he could defeat Federer now. :p

No. Fed is out of this world, but a healthy Rios could be top 10 easily in this clown era man, but beating Fed? no way, even Nadal on clay.

His main problem is that sometimes he didnt care about winning matches.

NicoFan
09-28-2007, 01:30 AM
Rios could be top 5 today without caring about winning 90% of his matches today. It's such an embarrassing time for tennis. :o :shrug:

GonzoFed
09-28-2007, 02:22 AM
Rios could be top 5 today without caring about winning 90% of his matches today. It's such an embarrassing time for tennis. :o :shrug:

Why do you follow today's tennis then? And why do you support a player that belongs to this embarrassing time, and who keeps getting his butt kicked by today's embarrassing players?

NicoFan
09-28-2007, 02:31 AM
Why do you follow today's tennis then? And why do you support a player that belongs to this embarrassing time, and who keeps getting his butt kicked by today's embarrassing players?

Wow...slight overreaction GonzoFed.

Chill...I've been watching tennis for about 30 years. And I think that this just isn't the best top 10 to go down in history.

As for Nico, yes, he's getting his butt kicked by everybody. At least I support him through the good and bad times...

Fergie
09-28-2007, 02:34 AM
Marcelo :worship: :worship: :worship:

GonzoFed
09-28-2007, 02:45 AM
Wow...slight overreaction GonzoFed.

Chill...I've been watching tennis for about 30 years. And I think that this just isn't the best top 10 to go down in history.

As for Nico, yes, he's getting his butt kicked by everybody. At least I support him through the good and bad times...

Ok. So it's just the Top 10 that sucks now. Fine. I don't think i overreact at all, just don't like sweeping generalizations.

NicoFan
09-28-2007, 02:50 AM
Ok. So it's just the Top 10 that sucks now. Fine. I don't think i overreact at all, just don't like sweeping generalizations.

GF - I was just trying to support No1Rios... :shrug: I wasn't making a sweeping generalization. Just trying to say that Rios was a great player who would be one of the top players today without even trying. It was supposed to be a compliment to Rios...

I'm off...

Alonsofz
09-28-2007, 02:54 AM
Chino Ríos at the court :worship::worship::worship:

But out of the court... :tape:

AnitaOlea
09-28-2007, 03:37 AM
Ya que hay puros chilenos hablando en este topic...chao con el ingles. No entiendo el afan de los chilenos de ver al chino rios como dios, será porque es el unico que llegó al numero 1? en verdad encuentro que el chino es un pésimo ejemplo de deportista de alto rendimiento. Además todos los puntos que ganaba era jugando en puros campeonatos medios charchitas donde no se metían los otro wenos... son contaos con una mano los torneos wenos.. claro ejemplo es cero GS.
Cero constancia, cero ejemplo, cero respeto por nadie... y hoy en dia, por favor top 5, en su super wen estado, mas etilico que nada, no le gana ni a gamonal.

GonzoFed
09-28-2007, 03:48 AM
Ya que hay puros chilenos hablando en este topic...chao con el ingles. No entiendo el afan de los chilenos de ver al chino rios como dios, será porque es el unico que llegó al numero 1? en verdad encuentro que el chino es un pésimo ejemplo de deportista de alto rendimiento. Además todos los puntos que ganaba era jugando en puros campeonatos medios charchitas donde no se metían los otro wenos... son contaos con una mano los torneos wenos.. claro ejemplo es cero GS.
Cero constancia, cero ejemplo, cero respeto por nadie... y hoy en dia, por favor top 5, en su super wen estado, mas etilico que nada, no le gana ni a gamonal.

Jajaja...igual ganó cinco masters series, cosa que para nada es fácil. Aún así veo con claridad tu punto, y en algo estoy de acuerdo. El que nadie lo criticara duramente y tuviera status de Dios acá pienso que lo perjudicó en el largo plazo. Se creyó mucho el cuento de genio que hay que aguantarle todo y como consecuencia nunca le puso el empeño y esfuerzo requerido para pasar de genio talentoso a gran campeón.

ChinoRios4Ever
09-29-2007, 03:51 AM
Ya que hay puros chilenos hablando en este topic...chao con el ingles. No entiendo el afan de los chilenos de ver al chino rios como dios, será porque es el unico que llegó al numero 1? en verdad encuentro que el chino es un pésimo ejemplo de deportista de alto rendimiento. Además todos los puntos que ganaba era jugando en puros campeonatos medios charchitas donde no se metían los otro wenos... son contaos con una mano los torneos wenos.. claro ejemplo es cero GS.
Cero constancia, cero ejemplo, cero respeto por nadie... y hoy en dia, por favor top 5, en su super wen estado, mas etilico que nada, no le gana ni a gamonal.

:wavey: 5 Super 9 y todos distintos... te parece poco? en una epoca donde existian miles de jugadores de gran nivel en arcilla y en hard... hoy salvo Federer y Nadal no hay jugadores de ese calibre...

le quito el numero 1 a... PETE SAMPRAS, te suena? el mejor tenista de la historia...

si, puede ser que no haya jugado bien los GS, sea por falta de preparacion, de interes o porque los rivales fueron mejores, pero tiene mucho mas merito ser numero 1 sin ganar un grande, todos sabemos que los torneos GS son los que mas puntos dan y el chino no necesito de eso para ser numero 1, sumo en todos y varios torneos... (espera lo que le pasara a Gonzalez luego del AO 08, un top 10 que basa su ranking en solo 3 torneos, seguramente saldra de los top 20)

en cuanto a su actitud fuera de la cancha, es todo cierto, pero claro estamos en un pais donde alguien que es exitoso se lo trata de bajar de cualquier forma para que sea mediocre igual que todos, es lo malo de Chile si alguien es exitoso o triunfador se lo baja de cualquier manera...

GRANDE CHINO, EL + GRANDE DE LA HISTORIA!!!!!! :worship::worship::worship:

Stgobaiano
09-29-2007, 04:30 AM
I agree:worship:

spencercarlos
09-29-2007, 04:55 AM
:wavey: 5 Super 9 y todos distintos... te parece poco? en una epoca donde existian miles de jugadores de gran nivel en arcilla y en hard... hoy salvo Federer y Nadal no hay jugadores de ese calibre...

le quito el numero 1 a... PETE SAMPRAS, te suena? el mejor tenista de la historia...

si, puede ser que no haya jugado bien los GS, sea por falta de preparacion, de interes o porque los rivales fueron mejores, pero tiene mucho mas merito ser numero 1 sin ganar un grande, todos sabemos que los torneos GS son los que mas puntos dan y el chino no necesito de eso para ser numero 1, sumo en todos y varios torneos... (espera lo que le pasara a Gonzalez luego del AO 08, un top 10 que basa su ranking en solo 3 torneos, seguramente saldra de los top 20)

en cuanto a su actitud fuera de la cancha, es todo cierto, pero claro estamos en un pais donde alguien que es exitoso se lo trata de bajar de cualquier forma para que sea mediocre igual que todos, es lo malo de Chile si alguien es exitoso o triunfador se lo baja de cualquier manera...

GRANDE CHINO, EL + GRANDE DE LA HISTORIA!!!!!! :worship::worship::worship:
Rios siempre fue un patán y por eso gano en tenis lo que se merecia, a pesar de que su talento lo pudo haber puesto dentro de los mejores de todos los tiempos.
Agassi fue un patan por algun tiempo en su carrera, al menos el pudo madurar a tiempo y ganar algunos grand slams y hacer historia.

Lo siento ser numero 1 sin grand slam, no es un numero 1 de verdad, si el ranking the dice que eres numero 1 pero no significa que eres el mejor. En contra parte Clijsters del 2003, Mauresmo del 2004 era consideradas unas sobrerankeadas por esta misma razon, nadie las respeto en ese momento como numero 1.

Pero como te digo Rios gano tanto como lo que merecio.

Stgobaiano
09-29-2007, 05:56 AM
Aguante Kepler Orellana!!!

Nathaliia
09-29-2007, 06:20 AM
Marcelo Rios is the best ever :worship:Hahaha Kepler Orellana ;) He retired, didn't he? ;)

Daniel
09-29-2007, 06:30 AM
Marcelo :yeah: :lol:

Stgobaiano
09-29-2007, 08:13 PM
Kepler orellana is venezuelan marcelo rios:D

Naide
09-29-2007, 08:24 PM
El chino :inlove:

DDrago2
09-29-2007, 08:27 PM
If Rios was so good as some people claim, than where are his trophies?

I think Rios is a "poor mans" /fill in/

Naide
09-29-2007, 08:32 PM
If Rios was so good as some people claim, than where are his trophies?

I think Rios is a "poor mans" /fill in/

You dont necessarily need trophies to be a good player.

ae wowww
09-29-2007, 09:16 PM
Guy is an absolute lad.

ChinoRios4Ever
09-29-2007, 10:29 PM
Kepler orellana is venezuelan marcelo rios:D

Orellana lead Rios 1-0 in the H2H :o

so... Orellana >>> Rios :sad: :confused:

NicolasKiefer44
09-30-2007, 01:51 PM
Darn. I went through this thread and no answers to any of the questions. But of course, I can only read English. So, maybe they are there.

I thought Rios was simply stunning. I remember when he dismissed Agassi at Key Biscayne in straight sets for the #1 ranking. It was almost silly how he sent Agassi home. I loved every second of it.

I remember how Agassi talked trash before the match saying how Rios had to prove himself because Agassi had already been #1. Well, being sent home in straight sets is mud on your face, Andre.

I don't hold his grand slam record against his history. For Rios to be #1 means that he was THE MAN for a while, even if he didn't win one of the big 4 events. To be #1 gets my nod for Rios.

And I am not just a Rios lover. I met him, he was dismissive and rude to me. However, I loved his game, his athleticism, and I could appreciate his talent.

thrust
09-30-2007, 04:06 PM
Rios- A wasted talent and a true jerk as a person.

Kitty de Sade
09-30-2007, 04:21 PM
Rios- A wasted talent and a true jerk as a person.

That sounds a bit harsh. He was low key and aloof, maybe- you have to figure that some players in the mold of Sampras, for example, handle the press/public attention more cautiously than others.

I suppose I can't speak for anyone else, but when I met him, he was quiet and soft spoken. A jerk though? Not at all.

*Viva Chile*
09-30-2007, 05:45 PM
Ya que hay puros chilenos hablando en este topic...chao con el ingles. No entiendo el afan de los chilenos de ver al chino rios como dios, será porque es el unico que llegó al numero 1? en verdad encuentro que el chino es un pésimo ejemplo de deportista de alto rendimiento. Además todos los puntos que ganaba era jugando en puros campeonatos medios charchitas donde no se metían los otro wenos... son contaos con una mano los torneos wenos.. claro ejemplo es cero GS.
Cero constancia, cero ejemplo, cero respeto por nadie... y hoy en dia, por favor top 5, en su super wen estado, mas etilico que nada, no le gana ni a gamonal.

GM official language is English, so discussions in spanish (or another language) will be closed, if you want to discuss in spanish, there are some threads in players forums.

nolop
09-30-2007, 06:47 PM
rios could do so many big things, only if....:sad:

Alonsofz
09-30-2007, 07:09 PM
You dont necessarily need trophies to be a good player.
:worship:
rios could do so many big things, only if....:sad:
:eek:

VolandriFan
10-01-2007, 03:01 AM
Rios could pull of practically every shot invented. He wasn't so bad in the looks department either, right? ;)

Too bad he was one of the most inconsistent players of his time.

horseman
10-01-2007, 11:21 AM
I was looking for some information on Marcelo Rios so I decided to search it on Wikipedia and look what I found.

Ríos' career has been marked by a number of controversies.

* He was fined US$10,000 for speeding during the 1998 Stuttgart tournament.
* At the 2000 Summer Olympics, he had been selected as Chile's standard-bearer for the opening ceremony, but refused to parade at the last minute, arguing that the Chilean Olympic Committee (Coch) had left his parents without promised tickets for the ceremony. Nicolás Massú took his place.
* In a confusing incident, he ran over his physical trainer, Manuel Astorga, with his jeep, leaving him gravely injured at the foot. Astorga was later fired as trainer.
* After a magazine published some photos of him dancing seductively with a woman at a Paris disco, his girlfriend Giuliana Sotela broke up with him. Later, during a Davis Cup press conference, he read a letter, asking Sotela for forgiveness. He ended the press conference in tears.
* He was accused by his second wife, Eugenia Larraín, of throwing her off of his car while visiting his daughter in Costa Rica. Larraín arrived to Santiago's airport in dramatic fashion, on a wheelchair and showing multiple bruises on her legs (he said those bruises were caused by falling while skiing).
* He was arrested in Rome in 2001 after he punched a taxi driver in the nose and then had a fight with the policemen arresting him.
* [B]In 2003, he urinated on a man in a La Serena bar's bathroom. He was later expelled from his hotel after being accused of swimming in the nude. ????
* In 2003 he and a friend were expelled from a Santiago bar after insulting other clients and being involved in a brawl with some waiters. Both were arrested and later released.
* His second wife, Eugenia Larraín, has said that he has undergone treatment for alcoholism.
* He reportedly told Monica Seles to move her "fat ass" while on a lunch queue, but he has denied this.
* During the Wimbledon tournament he commented that grass was for "cows and soccer" and not suitable for tennis play.
* He was disqualified from the 2000 Mercedes-Benz Cup tennis tournament in Los Angeles, California during a first round match with Gouichi Motomura of Japan and fined US$5,000 for saying "fuck you" to the chair umpire.
* He insulted a journalist under his breath during a post-match interview after she asked him whether he had Native American ancestry. :haha:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special:Search?search=marcelo+rios

Yeah... He was one of my favorites.:D When I read about Attila the Hun I'm imagining him as Rios :)

TheBoiledEgg
10-01-2007, 01:43 PM
Marcelo invented the two-handed BH jump-shot

there's no genius like a flawed genius.

DDrago2
10-01-2007, 06:21 PM
I think you are all over-rating Rios and his talent. I know may pros are sticking with that opinion (Safin commented like Rios was the most talented player ever etc.) but I think they are all making a mistake. Rios Grand Slam (un)succes is a real picture of his talent/quality, sorry

Nidhogg
07-21-2008, 08:52 PM
Could anyone please give me an in-depth description on this crazy chilean to me, in terms of playing style? I didn't start watching tennis more than casually til late 2004. From what I've seen on YT he's a talented lefty, but it would be interesting to hear how you people describe him. =)

Nidhogg
07-21-2008, 08:57 PM
Haha, shazam, thanks for moving my thread.

Eden
03-09-2010, 09:27 PM
Marcelo Rios: The Mysterious Champion

Published by Scoop Malinowski on January 15, 2010


“Be not afraid of greatness: some are born great, some achieve greatness and some have greatness thrust upon them.” — Shakespeare.

“There is no great genius without some touch of madness.” — Seneca.

No tennis player ever awed us with his beautiful talents quite like Marcelo Rios. Even his name flowed smoothly, like that of some legendary artist from centuries ago. The great Rios turned pro in 1994 and went on to win 18 career singles titles, including five Masters Series. He produced his finest season in 1998, capturing three consecutive Masters Series titles (Indian Wells, Key Biscayne and Rome) along with four other titles. Rios even became No. 1 — at the age of 22 — for six weeks after conquering Andre Agassi in a captivating performance on Key Biscayne to become the first South American to rise to the top of the ATP rankings. But for how familiar we were with the Rios style on the court — that leaping two-handed backhand, the graceful and artful movements, those uncanny angles, the Chilean chanting from his flag-waving supporters — there was always an aura of mystery about Rios. Why did he seem so often to be joyless on the court? For what reasons was he so reluctant to do media interviews or engage with the fans or even other players? Was his reputation for being unapproachable an act of self-defense because he was actually very shy? The enigma of Rios will continue to confound us now that he retired (due to repeated leg and back injuries) in 2004 from professional tennis at the age of 28.

His last ATP matches were in April of 2004, losses in Satellite events in Ecuador and Mexico City to Mariano Delfino and Juan Pablo Guzman. Suddenly the career of Rios was over, without any final applause or a befitting tribute. Even the idea for this article only came by a chance comment during an unrelated interview with former Australian Open winner Thomas Johansson. The Swede just so happened to share this anecdote of Rios when I asked him for a funny tennis memory, something from tennis that made him laugh: “All the guys have different humors, outside of the court,” Johansson said. “A player that I really liked to watch was Rios. I think he was one of the best players, ever. Because I remember one year when he was gonna play Thomas Muster in Rome. And I saw the press conference before the match. And they asked him, so how are you gonna be able to beat Muster, because he only had lost one or two matches on clay so far. And Rios said, ‘The guy should be happy if he gets like a couple of games.’And Rios went out there the next day and killed him, 1 and 2. And that’s for me unbelievable. I really liked to watch him. I didn’t like to play him though. But I really liked to watch him.”

Asked why he didn’t enjoy the experience of playing Rios, Johansson replied: “He could make you feel like it was the first time you were standing on a tennis court, you know [smiling]? So I hated to play him. You could get killed by him easily, 1 and 1 or something like that, and you could have played a good match.”

Johansson’s high regard for Rios sparked a curiosity to investigate further insights about Rios from others in the tennis community. If a Grand Slam champion like Thomas Johansson had such respect for Rios, just what else would some of the other ATP insiders have to say? So here’s an interesting and insightful collection of memories and lasting images of one of the great tennis players of this modern era — Marcelo Rios:

Jimmy Arias, former No. 4 in the world: “My one memory of Marcelo Rios is — I was retired for a number of years already — and he was ranked No. 2 in the world in 1998. And he lost first round of Wimbledon. And made some disparaging remarks about Wimbledon. He came to Bollettieri’s because he had to practice for the rest of the summer. And I was the only one there. Everyone else that played was still at Wimbledon. So I was a decent enough player for him to practice with. So Nick called, ‘Can you come? Marcelo Rios is here for a couple of weeks?’ So we play the first day, the first set — and he’s not trying at all [smiles]. He’s just sort of lounging around. And I win the set 6-4. And as is my way, when I play a top guy of today, I find a way to give them a little jab, just to see how they react. So we finish the set and as we’re shaking hands after, I said, ‘Marcelo, what would you rank me if I were playing today? Two or three in the world?’ And he said, ‘Man, tomorrow, I’m going to kick your ass!’And I liked his attitude. And actually, some of the top players, when I give them a hard time, they actually didn’t want to play with me anymore. When I would say something like that, they would get insulted. They didn’t want to play with me. Rios came at me. He said, ‘No, I’m gonna kick your ass tomorrow.’ And sure enough, we came back the next day, and for about three games, he was fired up. And I was playing well and was down 3-love. And he couldn’t keep that intensity, because it’s practice. He’s just so relaxed. Eventually the set was close. But I did see for those three games what talent he had. He would hit a couple of forehands in a rally, and with that same swing — not a bigger backswing, nothing — he’d suddenly hit it 20 miles-per-hour harder. Down the line for a winner. You didn’t know how that happened. You couldn’t understand how the same swing produced such a different pace on the ball. So that’s part of what he had that the other players couldn’t figure out.”

Hernan Gumy, former top 50 ATP player from Argentina: “I have a personal memory about him because we were kind of close. He didn’t get along with many players. But we were kind of friends in a way. And we play against each other many times. The greatness of his game — I didn’t see anybody who play like him in the past 10 years. All the most difficult things he made it easy. I mean, it was so nice to watch him play. It would have been great to have him for a couple of more years. He’s still young but, every time I spoke with him, he said that he was not made to travel 25 weeks a year. Or play 20 tournaments. He loved to play the big tournaments but he didn’t like the whole life of a tennis player. So you have to understand that also. But I think he was a great. He was a nice guy from, I repeat, my side. And he was a helluva tennis player…The fans and the media never got to him — really close. I think you have to check the background. In Chile, when he was a kid, he had some problems with the media when he was 16. When he stepped up to complain about something about the Federation. So maybe after that he took some distance from the media around the world. With the fans also. Like I said, he was gifted to play tennis. But he was maybe not gifted to do whatever is outside to the inside of the tennis court. Because he loved to practice, sacrifice. He loved to compete. But everything else outside of the tennis — you name it, the fans, the kids — he wasn’t able to do it. Because of his character, he didn’t enjoy to do that. He’s a guy who, I believe, he do things that he enjoy…We were close. I mean, he was a sensitive guy. Personally, he was a guy that I really liked. I know that not many players like him, but I like him.”

Luis Lobo, former coach: “I just have good things to talk about Marcelo. I think he was the most professional player that I’ve ever seen. I know the people think of him another way, but for me he was a very good professional. He was one of the best players in the world, for sure. For sure he’s one of the best players in history. For me, yes. Because, about tennis, if he made a Grand Slam or No. 1 for more time, for sure he’s one of the best guys I ever see. Very talented. If you play against him on a day when he’s focused, very tough to beat him, very tough. He had so many great matches — Monte Carlo against Kuerten, Paris against Albert Costa, indoors when he make Singapore — so many good matches. (What held him back from winning a Slam?) It’s a good question, I don’t know. I’m not a psychologist [laughs]. He was very close to winning a Grand Slam. He lost the final (in Australian Open to Korda in ‘98), and then personal problems. I don’t know. One part of each player — some players when they’re this close to the final, they make it. And others, no, they can’t do it. But I think he was injured a long time too. And the moment for him was a stress fracture in the lower back, and problems with legs…He was very nice person. Very nice. When he was in a tournament, he would be alone and no say hello to anybody. Just a few guys. He didn’t believe too much in the people. And I think he was right. Because in tennis, the world is very tough to be friends.”

Fabrice Santoro: “I played Marcelo three times. You could say, on the court, he was a great, great player. And one of the greats of the game. He was to serve well and he hit the ball really, really well on both sides. He hit the backhand moving well too. I remember when he won Indian Wells and Key Biscayne in a row, he was playing one of the best tennis I’ve ever seen…We played three times, he beat me twice. It was always a good match. Because I like to use the spins and slice on the court and when I was playing against him, it was a very fun match, but it was a very good competition. His talents — one of the best. A lefty Agassi. (What was he missing?) Sometimes a little bit short physically. Because other guys can serve really well. He can play well forehands, backhands, moves pretty well. But five sets for two weeks — too tough for him.”

Wayne Ferreira: “He was really good because he took the ball early and he had a lot of feel on the ball. He moved pretty well and he was a good competitor. But he was so good at finding where the ball was going and taking it so early…I didn’t really have a problem with him. I actually did pretty well against him. I beat him most of the times that I played against him. I just felt like I could overpower him a lot. He got a lot of balls back and he took it early but, to me, he was a little bit soft at times. He didn’t hit the ball that hard. I felt like he hit the ball, I could still run down everything. I could overpower him. But he was difficult. He could get a lot of balls back, make you play a lot of balls. I had to be in great shape and I had to be really competitive and concentrate a lot to beat him. (Why did he not win a Slam?) Maybe for that reason. I think he was just a little bit soft. Guys like Pete and Andre — on a regular basis — when it got tight, tough like this, they used to overpower him.”

Roger Federer: (When asked back in 2000 which was his favorite tennis player to watch): “I like Rios. I like his game. When he’s playing well, he’s fun to watch. Because he’s a different type of guy.”

Vera Zvonareva: “I think Rios was a great tennis player. I watched him play maybe a year and a half ago in Washington. And I think he was a great player to watch for me. I think he was like an actor on the court. And I love it because he was doing his show. Everybody knows it’s tough to play tennis, especially when it’s 100 degree. And he was like performing like an actor. You can always see his emotions. He wasn’t just like standing there doing his job, you could see how he feels.”

Patrick McEnroe (his ESPN commentary during the first set of the 2002 Nasdaq- 100 semifinals vs. Agassi): “I’m not even sure if he goes out there with a strategy, Cliff. He just goes out there and just swings away, angles the ball, it looks like he just sort of free-wheels it out there and relies on his talent. Agassi used to do that. Agassi would just bomb the ball and just says, I’m just gonna be a shotmaker and I’m gonna rely on that. But why Agassi has won seven Slams now and Rios has won zero is because Agassi has learned to play his opponents, to play within himself, to come out there focused, to be physically fit, to have a strategy, have a gameplan…The players are just too good these days, to think you can go out there and just free-wheel it…That is SCARY right there! That is pure genius right there. What a one-two from Rios. Just launching himself into that backhand, taking it in mid-flight for the clean winner cross court (at 7-7 in the first-set tiebreak – which Rios won 9-7, but he retired after losing the second set 6-4.).”

Guillermo Vilas: “I talked to him a couple of times. He didn’t talk too much. He had a strong character. It’s like when you are in front of a lion — you are not going give some candy to a lion, right? Everybody knew he was like that. Some people are like that. If you give him enough space, he’s okay…He play well, but he could never win something very big. He had the qualities to do that, then his body gave out. But he left his image to the players — a very good way of playing and the attitude was like a rebel. He was very interesting, to add color to the game. If he wouldn’t have had all those injuries, he would have been better, much better. The time he was there, he was exciting. But it’s sad, because the body gave out. He was a great player, but you have to be champion of the world. He was geared to do that, but the body didn’t allow him to do that. Like it happened to Muster. Muster was gearing to be No. 1. Suddenly he had the accident (hit by car in Miami) and three years after, he did it. Rios didn’t have that second chance. You can say Rios was one of the most gifted ever. But not one of the best ever. Because you have to win something, you have to do a little bit more. He looked very nice, everything he did. But the body did not allow him to do it.”

Ilie Nastase: “He’s the worst prick I ever met. The players of today probably have the same opinion of him. Ask all the players what they think of him, you’ll get the same thing. When somebody doesn’t sign autographs for the kids, that is a prick for me. (What about his game?) I don’t give a shit. I don’t look at him. For me, he’s an idiot. I don’t know what else to tell about him. And that’s the first time I say something about somebody like that. I think he was the worst thing for tennis. He did not deserve to be No. 1 — one or two days. To live with the other players like he did — terrible. He really was the worst. I never say anything about anybody else like this but about him I have to say this. Sorry.”

Pat Cash: “Rios is one of the most talented players I’ve ever seen. I thought he had a control like a McEnroe. He was definitely a wasted talent but he still got to number one in the world. I loved watching him. He was brilliant. He hit the ball anywhere. Anywhere…I played doubles with him one week, in Scottsdale in ‘95 or ‘96. When I was making a comeback. We practiced quite a bit. And when I practiced with him, I never ran so much in my life. I played with a lot of the top guys in practice and he was just able to hit the ball anywhere. He used to run me everywhere. (How did you do in doubles with Rios?) Not very good. It wasn’t his fault though [smiles]. I was making a bit of a comeback and I was pretty terrible. But he was a brilliant player and I was disappointed that he never actually fulfilled his potential. (Get along well with him?) I got on all right with him. A lot of other guys didn’t like him, that’s for sure. Not many guys, I think, got along with him. And he was fine to me. We always had a good time, we practiced hard and I liked his game. And I think he appreciated somebody that was nice to him, I think.”

Melchior DiGiacomo, noted tennis photographer: “I think he’s one of the best players I’ve ever seen play the game. I’ve been following tennis since 1971. And I thought Rios was a bit of a throwback in many ways. He reminded me of guys like Ken Rosewall — who had so many great shots. Guys like Tom Okker who was a brilliant player. Rios was that way. But I couldn’t figure Rios’ head. Because I never knew where he was on the court. Whereas the older players, you always knew where their head was 7#8212; their head was, To win. At all costs. But Rios, I don’t know. There’s a wonderful line written by Norman Mailer in a book called ‘The Bullfighter.’ He’s talking about how a man cannot be judged by what he is, the man is best judged at his greatest moment. (Melchior sent the exact quote to me the next day: “The one thing that can keep the sweet nerve of life alive is the knowledge that a man cannot be judged by what he is every day, but only at his greatest moment, for that is when he shows what he was intended to be..It is a Latin approach, their allegiance is to the genius of blood. So they judge a man by what he is at his best.”) And that’s what Rios was to me. There are times when you look at him and you say, Nobody in the world has ever done what he has just done, in terms of the match. And then you may see him the next day or two days later and you go, What happened to that guy that was out here a couple of days ago? Is it the same guy? I don’t know how you get to a kid like that. Again, he was brilliant. There were other players who were like that — Mel Purcell never had a killer shot. But you had to hit him over the head with a shovel if you wanted to beat him. But Rios’ head was the thing. He had every shot in the game. There was nothing he couldn’t do. (How was he as a subject to shoot?) Brilliant. Because of his athleticism. He wasn’t like Adriano Panatta, who was like this stand-up, at-attention Italian. He had a beautiful game but there really wasn’t anything to shoot, in terms of physical action. Rios is the kind of guy that could stop on a dime and give you five cents change. He was very exciting to shoot. Connors was not very exciting to shoot, in the sense that he played basically a baseline game, rarely came to the net. And the only time Jimmy was exciting was when he pumped up the crowd. Then he was exciting. But photographing Rios during a match was always exciting. And you had to be quick, because he was quick. When guys are running as fast as he is and lunging out making shots, that’s exciting for me, because he fills the frame. He’s not standing up straight. But Rios was exciting. And he’ll be missed. By me. I don’t know about everybody else.”

Carl Munnerlyn, U.S. Open locker room supervisor: “Rios was very giving. When I knew him, when he was a player, he always, after each practice, he would come in and go up to one of the attendants and always offer a pair of his shoes that he just practiced in. And even after the match. His match shoe, that he wore in the match. He’d always come up to us and give us his shoes. Every time, every day he was here. It was unbelievable how such a giving person he was. Not too many people knew him that way, but we, as locker room attendants, knew him that way — as a very giving, courteous person. And he always joked with us, he liked to joke with us. Because he saw us as people he could relate to. He was relaxed with us. And we brought out his lighter side, his personality, instead of serious all the time, like always getting ready for a match. One time I was standing next to the soda refrigerator and he walked by and gave my head a push. I turned around and Marcelo’s walking out the door, smiling. So that’s how I know him. He was friendly to me. In that sense, I know him that way. He was never not the slightest bit sarcastic to me. That’s what I know of Marcelo Rios. Nice guy.”

Petr Korda: “I beat him badly (in 1998 Australian Open final 6-2, 6-2, 6-2). It was very — actually I had the chance to see the match on video for the first time a month and a half ago. And in TV it looked completely different than it did on the court. But I remember I was really dominating and I was ready for that. I knew this was probably my last chance to win a Slam — and if I played the right game, then I could beat him. I think I really shot him down that day. I know we were hitting the balls very hard. On the TV it doesn’t look like it. I was hitting balls very hard. (What kind of person was Rios?) I think that not many people knew him. Some people had problems with him, he was like a controversial, not many people did like him. But I know him, we play doubles. I don’t know if it was before or after we played in Australian Open. He was a nice guy. Gifted player. And I said in Australia, he can be maybe number one. But it’s most important to win the Slam. Unfortunately for him, he never achieved it. Maybe I was that reason, probably.”

Angelica Gavaldon (Former WTA top 30): “My mom remembers him carrying my laundry bag in Sydney. I think he is a really sweet person. I really like Marcelo Rios. I know a lot of people had mixed feelings about him but I personally thought he was really shy .The first time I met him was at The US OPEN and my coach at the time, Pato Rodriguez, scheduled a practice session with him, we played baseline games and after he went up to Pato and said, ‘Wow, I did not know girls could actually play tennis.’ I thought it was funny. Later on in Australia we where at the same tournaments and I remember him waking up super early almost everyday to practice with me at 6:30 AM. I played okay that year and I think he didn’t win a match, so I felt guilty that it was probably because I don’t hit the ball like a guy.”

Jaime Fillol, former Chilean pro tennis player with six career singles titles, quarterfinalist 1975 U.S. Open: “I first met him in New York when he was a junior. And he was already playing well in Futures. We became very close. We run an AP event in Chile. We would have to many times negotiate with him, his participation, especially when he was top 10. I think he was a very good player, he had a lot of talent. Not just with his hands, but with his mind. Very good at feeling no pressure and I think that’s what made him so good. There’s a lot of people that have talent but when it comes to winning, they have a hard time winning. And he was winning a lot of matches at a young age. Then I think he got hurt too much, too often, he couldn’t keep it up. There was criticism over his attitude — that he wouldn’t fight hard enough. But I would say that his personality was not a disciplined mentality. He was very erratic in that respect. He was not a Saxon or a Slavic, he’s Chilean, he’s kind of moody. And if he doesn’t feel good, he just doesn’t try. Not because he’s lazy, because he doesn’t feel good. So I think that was the criticism — which was fair — in order to be a champion and stay there as champion — you have to have the discipline too. Have the discipline, as far as to be a champion.” Asked for his lasting image of Rios, Fillol replied: “Playing so well that it was so much fun to watch him play. In fact, he really could make almost anyone look like a beginner. If things were right, he would guess exactly where the ball was coming. He would anticipate. He didn’t have to be strong physically to make the ball go and to have the guy run from one side to the other. I think his body didn’t hold the pressure of the circuit. He was weak in his preparation, probably coming from Chile, not knowing exactly what was gonna happen if he was that good. I don’t think he was prepared physically for the Tour. (Did he ever win the Chile event?) He never won the tournament, that’s why I didn’t mention it [smiles]. He got to the finals four times. He would make the crowd very upset because everybody was waiting for him to win the first time. He made the finals four times and lost to guys he should have beat — Slava Dosedel, Hernan Gumy and recently he lost in 2002 to David Sanchez. He was winning 6-1 and 40-love to go up 4-1 and lost the game. And then he couldn’t play. He became nervous.” “He was very — the word in is Spanish, ‘contradictorio’ — he would do the unexpected. If you were waiting for him to say hello to you, he’s not gonna say hello to you. If you didn’t think he’d say hello to you, he’d come up and say hello to you. He treated people like that. Not that he didn’t care for people, it was just like a game. He made a lot of enemies because of that, but I don’t think he’s a bad person. I would say he didn’t have the same discipline you need to have off the court. Many times he would do things — I mean the President of Chile was practically disgraced by him. When he became number one and the President invited him to the Palace and he came in a shirt, looking like he was going to the beach. And the President said, ‘Marcelo would you like to say something to the people?’ ‘No, I don’t want to say anything.’ So he turned the President of the country off just by being different. He didn’t think it was a big occasion, but he’s not a bad person. “I saw him about two months ago in Santiago, at the gym where he was training. I was talking to his physical trainer. And Marcelo was there, although he is retired, he still goes to the gym every day and trains, so he’s in good shape, other than the pain that he says he feels when he plays tennis.”

“A man of genius makes no mistakes. His errors are volitional and are the portals of discovery.” — James Joyce, Ulysses

“We don’t see things as they are, we see things as we are.” — Anais Nin

“To be great is to be misunderstood.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson

(Note: This article is currently being developed into an unauthorized biography about Marcelo Rios.)

Source: http://thebiofile.com/2010/01/marcelo-rios-the-mysterious-champion/

tennishero
03-09-2010, 10:00 PM
http://cdn.adamp.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/wall-of-text.jpg

Smoke944
03-09-2010, 10:18 PM
Thanks Eden.
The quote from Nastase :lol:

ApproachShot
03-09-2010, 10:33 PM
Strong stuff there from Nastase. Did he know this was going to be printed?

Action Jackson
03-09-2010, 10:38 PM
That article is very old actually, but not a bad read.

Riosreigned
03-09-2010, 11:37 PM
Rios was a GREAT player, you have to be GREAT to get to #!.

There is a very good article about Rios at www.thebiofile.com

highly recommend it,

Riosreigned
03-09-2010, 11:40 PM
Oops my bad, posted the same link as Eden after reading page 3, ddin't realize Eden beat me to the punch : )

abraxas21
03-09-2010, 11:51 PM
The article seems to be more a collection of quotes than a true article but a good read in any case.

You can say Rios was one of the most gifted ever. But not one of the best ever.

This is like the first time I agree with Vilas ever. I think Ríos is one of the most talented players I've ever seen. He could produce amazing angles, create new shots and hit the ball early anywhere from both sides playing aggressively a bit like Agassi used to do. I remember when he won Key Beyscane almost making Agassi look like an amateur in the final... I've never truly seen anyone like him in the way in which he played a creative tennis.
That said, I think Ríos lacked the winning mentality and the physical shape to be a truly great player. He just didn't care all that much (you could see him partying during tournaments or gambling at the casinos quite often) and at other times in which he cared he was injured.

That goes for his place as a tennis player... Now him as a person:

When people say he was an asshole, I can really understand it because many times he behaved like an asshole. He didn't like talking to the media and his "no estoy ni ahí" saying (a rather rude way of saying "i don't care") became some sort of national expression among the youths in chile. He also didn't mind offending others when he felt threatened. He was quite a character!
However, what drove many people off him (but paradoxically something that particularly loved of him) was his smugness. The guy knew he was very talented and he wasn't afraid to express it in the crudest way possible. The way he used to talk about beating players Muster (and then backing it up on the court) was quite common in his press conferences and he didn't care what his opponents, the media or his fans might say. It was like him saying "yeah, I'm good and I don't care what you think of what I say, so fuck you in advanced".

thrust
03-10-2010, 04:14 PM
Most overrated player ever.

True, and along with Nastasse the most idiotic ever. Interestingly, I have the same opion of Nastasse as he does of Rios. Both were mentally disturbed jerks!

Riosreigned
03-10-2010, 05:08 PM
Rios was always real, you have to give him credit for that. He gave you the truth, how he felt he exxpressed it. Gotta respect honesty so pure like that.

I also seem to remember when he said to themedia if the top players ever tested positive, you would never hear about it. he was dead right on that, as the case of Agassi last year showed. Gotta respect his bluntness.

Though he was like that in the past, he has become a nicer fellow these days, as shown in that champions tour interview, and reports from Bollettieri himslef how Rios has changed and is much more polite and gracious now that he has three kids. Good to hear. He truly was a remarkable player. Federer loves his game too and has said so many times in the media. I heard from a friend this week Federer was having fun practicing this week in Indian Wells with Berrer and Fed even tried the Rios two handed backhand jump shot.Which Rios invented.

oldtimer
03-10-2010, 05:56 PM
Not exactly easy to like, but spellbinding on court. Wasted, bit like Gasquet.

Actually Gasquet is a sorrier story than Rios, never mind.