Will ASIA become a 'tennis powerhouse'??!! [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Will ASIA become a 'tennis powerhouse'??!!

CmonAussie
05-28-2004, 07:57 PM
You beauty pearler fair dinkum bottler ridgy didge tennis fanatics :worship: !

:wavey: @@ For some time now I've been wondering if tennis would truly boom in Asia or not; also whether the continent with half the world's population (over 3-billion in the East) can produce a truly great tennis champion?!

* It looks like the wheels are in action for the boom-> consider Srichaphan becoming the 1st Asian man to crack top-10 in rankings last year; Shanghai hosting 02 TMC & set to stage TMC from 05->07 again; Beijing has the Olympics in 08 & brand-new 10,000 seat state-of-the-art stadium; Hyung Taik Lee from Korea won Sydney IS last year (beat Roddick & Ferrero there) & currently in Rd3 at FO; Shinobu Asagoe from Japan is into Rd4 of womens at FO; & perhaps most surprising/pleasing of all is Jie Zheng of China~ who has made Rd4 at Roland Garros & the Draw is opening up(since Henin lost) for her so she may even make SF with a bit of luck!!!

# Back to my original question-> how far can Asian tennis go?? How long will it take before an Asian born player can win a Grand Slam singles? Also will we ever see a Slam staged in Asia or do you think they'll begin relocating TMS events there in the future..?

Personally I can foresee a Chinese lady winning a Slam maybe 5-years from now!! Also a decade later I wouldn't be surprised if they start referring to The China Open (Beijing) as "The 5th Slam"~ of course not officially but in the same way that Miami TMS is often called the 5th Slam (or Players Championship in Golf also has that unofficial title!).

PS; The dream scenario would be for Paradorn Srichaphan to win Wimbledon :angel: ~ but somehow I think Tim Henman :worship: has more chance of winning French Open than Paradorn does winning any of the big-4!! :sad:

Vass
05-28-2004, 08:00 PM
like in every other sport, Asians will rule all.

YoursTruly
05-28-2004, 09:21 PM
Don't forget the Israeli players in both tours, singles and doubles like Smashnova-Pistolesi, the great Indian doubles players and number of Japanese women playing well. :)

Horatio Caine
05-28-2004, 09:28 PM
Undoubtedly! It will take a least twenty years for there to be several players in the top 100 but it will happen. With more money being invested in tennis and tournaments going to Asia such as the Masters Cup, this will inspire so many Asians to play tennis and they will eventually make it to the higher level. Some are already making it e.g. Yeu Leu at 102/103 in the world.

pmhong
05-28-2004, 09:48 PM
Tennis is an expensive sport to learn. That is the biggest reason why few Asians are groomed to become a pro from childhood. Michael Chang has already proven than asians can play tennis. Too bad he lost to Sampras in US open. And he never became #1. He was very close, very close. Too bad that he played right along Sampras during his prime years.

Hyung Taik Lee is a Korean player who is doing decent on the tour, but he cannot compete against top players. Srichaphan, the Thai player is much better and has the potential to win a big one. Let's hope that he does well in Wimbledon and US.

Shy
05-28-2004, 09:51 PM
Tennis is an expensive sport to learn. That is the biggest reason why few Asians are groomed to become a pro from childhood. Michael Chang has already proven than asians can play tennis. Too bad he lost to Sampras in US open. And he never became #1. He was very close, very close. Too bad that he played right along Sampras during his prime years.

.
Except now, a lots of them have money to play tennis.It will take many years for them to develop a great player,but it will come.Like many sport, they might start to dominate.

Hokit
05-29-2004, 04:38 AM
Will ASIA become a 'tennis powerhouse'??!!

It's possible. Michael Chang won the French Open before and was a regular fixture in the top-5 during most of the 90s. And on the WTA side, Kimiko Date was ranked as high as no.4, which was during the time when players like Graf and Seles were her competition.

Smankyou
05-29-2004, 04:46 AM
LMAO @ kku's avatar!

Steve-o
05-29-2004, 05:50 AM
Yes I think Asia will make an impact but not for another 10 years.

Asia has a lot of top juniors in international competition but very few pro's. It is arguably very difficult geographically and expensive to hop around playing futures in Asia unless you are sponsored by your country or have deep pockets, unlike if you were say a young French or Spanish pro who can play a ton of futures, satellites and challenger events by hopping in a car or a train.

I think this will slowly change though. China appears to be tennis-mad and has the population and diversity of body types and sizes to create pros. Lee says that his success has made tennis a lot more popular in Korea as with Srichaphan. Taiwan has a guy just around the top 100 and another inside the top 200 and both are very young with a good future. India is probably a lost cause in competitive sports for administrative, cultural, and government reasons.

azza
05-29-2004, 07:39 AM
No. :haha:

Neely
05-29-2004, 09:32 AM
China appears to be tennis-mad and has the population and diversity of body types and sizes to create pros.
wow! is that really true?
well, the only thing I know about them being mad is that China is table-tennis. Almost everybody can play table tennis, it is a very cheap sport to learn, doesn't need as much place as tennis, can be played more easily indoor and table tennis has a huge tradition in China. I remember Germany playing against China in the table tennis World Team Championships some months ago and they said that almost the whole country is watching this game live on TV. The popularity of table tennis is awesome in China and they are doing so well, they are almost unbeatable.

drf716
05-29-2004, 11:05 AM
i think tennis appeals to people with money... that is why badminton is much famous than tennis in asia because it is "easier"and less expensive... it will take time... but it will happen!!

Steve-o
05-29-2004, 01:33 PM
Look at the broadcast schedules for Masters Series tournaments in China on say the Monte Carlo website sometime. China usually broadcasts a lot of tennis on their channels. The Masters Cup was very popular as well.

Sports takes time to disseminate but it is inevitable. The sharing of ideas and coaching is very easy now, so like it or not I think they will catch up within 10, more likely 15 years.

CmonAussie
05-29-2004, 03:06 PM
Look at the broadcast schedules for Masters Series tournaments in China on say the Monte Carlo website sometime. China usually broadcasts a lot of tennis on their channels. The Masters Cup was very popular as well.

Sports takes time to disseminate but it is inevitable. The sharing of ideas and coaching is very easy now, so like it or not I think they will catch up within 10, more likely 15 years.
:rolleyes:
Steve-o mate~ what do you mean by "...like it or not..."??

@@ Of course it's going to be positive for the game of tennis overall if ASIA catches up with Europe & America!! Not only because Asia represents the potential financial future of tennis (via Sponsors, Broadcast rights etc..) but because tennis benefits the more international it becomes! Look what Kuertan has done for Tennis in Brazil; or Borg/Edberg/Wilander in Sweden, now Srichaphan is having a similiar impact in Thailand->> already started new ATP tournament as a direct result of Pardorn's popularity! Wouldn't it be boring if only American's won USO & only Spanish won FO??!!! :sad: * The day an Asian man or worman wins a singles Slam will be a day worth celebrating :worship: :D :cool:

i love paradorn
05-29-2004, 05:13 PM
I think Australia will never be a tennis powerhouse

CmonAussie
05-29-2004, 05:45 PM
I think Australia will never be a tennis powerhouse
:o
Is this your idea of a joke 'i love paradorn'?? :rolleyes:

* Pretty dumb of you; since you're not even answering the title of this thread, i'm saying lots of positive things about Asian tennis & particularly Pardorn->> then you tell me "Australia will never be a tennis powerhouse.."!

@@ Not only is your humour lame but your a nasty moron too; plus lacking in any sense of tennis history!!

Have you ever heard of Rod Laver (Aussie guy.)~ by chance he won 11 Slams & {AO, FO, Wimbledon, USO} all 4-SLams in the same calendar year twice (nobody else has even done it once!).
Ken Rosewall
John Newcombe
Fred Stolle
Margaret Courte
Evonne Goulagong
Pat Cash
Pat Rafter
Lleyton Hewitt... any of these names ring a bell??

Oh yeah which country has won the Davis Cup 28-times (including 2004)??

'I love paradorn' mate; your are an ignorant moron, nasty thick-minded lame joke maker, & you can't even read the original question!!! :rolleyes:

Why do I waste my time replying to wankers :sad:

CmonAussie
05-29-2004, 05:46 PM
Oops 2003 AUS won DC~ my memory is terrible; seems so long ago!

Steve-o
05-29-2004, 08:19 PM
No the response was to Azza who found it funny that people think Asia can become good at tennis, not because I don't like it.

Diversity is good for the game; the tour now to me is infinitely more preferable than if it was restricted to the US, France, UK, Australia, and Spain like it was in the early 20th century.

So yes, I would find it refreshing if more Asian and African players become tour players.

Once upon a time, US basketball was considered untouchable, and the best basketball players by far were from the US. Through the spread of coaching and increasing popularity of bball worldwide other countries have closed the gap, although the very very best basketball players are still Americans.

ONe more thing, Aussie, despite your country's history I think your prospects after Hewitt and Scud are gone are a bit concerning. I have seen Reid play and I'm not convinced he's the heir to Hewitt's throne. Kennedy is decent but ordinary. Haven't seen Guccione or Ryan Henry (what happened to this guy?) play much either but it definitely seems you could be headed for a dry spell in the near future.

i love paradorn
05-30-2004, 02:56 AM
Yeah, I was merely responding to azza's lame response. I hate idiots who take things too seriously. Yeah aussie, you're right, i haven't heard of hewitt, mark. p, laver, rafter, and any of those players. What countries do they come from?

argiesf
05-30-2004, 04:10 AM
Sure it will and it will happen fast - all the companies behind that market will pour money in China and other countries (not Japan). Is a huge market.

The companies are investing in tennis because there is going to be a huge revenue in Asia (especially China). The AO is already working hard on that....coz there is a lot of money behind. :wavey:

argiesf
05-30-2004, 04:17 AM
Yeah, I was merely responding to azza's lame response. I hate idiots who take things too seriously. Yeah aussie, you're right, i haven't heard of hewitt, mark. p, laver, rafter, and any of those players. What countries do they come from?


I hate those idiots too... :wavey: :haha: :haha: :crazy:

CmonAussie
06-19-2007, 08:04 PM
###
...
BUMP!!

I began this thread over 3-years ago & it seems that as far as men`s tennis is concerned Asian Tennis has gone backwards since 2004><..

Srichaphan failed to fulfill his potential in my opinion [was he satisfied after reaching Top-10 in 04???].
...
Other Asian male potential stars have failed to emerge!

``On the other hand women`s tennis in Asia & particularly China has certainly seen a boom..
Perhaps we`ll see a Chinese female win a Slam within the next 5-years???

Stensland
06-19-2007, 08:29 PM
has tennis actually kicked in already in china? i mean, if they really liked the sport and if they'd consider it important enough, the chinese government would've "produced" some top players by now. just like they did it in table-tennis.

seems to me that the chinese still don't really care about tennis.

jazar
06-19-2007, 08:34 PM
no

silverwhite
06-19-2007, 08:56 PM
has tennis actually kicked in already in china? i mean, if they really liked the sport and if they'd consider it important enough, the chinese government would've "produced" some top players by now. just like they did it in table-tennis.

seems to me that the chinese still don't really care about tennis.

It's only been gaining in popularity recently, with the Olympic women's doubles win in 04, Yan/Zheng winning AO and Wimby last year and Li Na breaking into the Top 20. It's not going to happen overnight. :shrug:

D Optimist
06-19-2007, 09:19 PM
For the moment they don't got good specialists,but after a time -maybe 10 years- the Asian tennis players will be in top because they work hard .

Richard_from_Cal
06-19-2007, 10:02 PM
In the 1920 "Challenge Round" at Wimbledon, a Japanese player, Zensho Shimizu, made the final against William T. Tilden, 2nd. He lost.

Bill went on to face G.L. Patterson (AUS) whom he defeated 2-6, 6-3, 6-2, 6-4, for "Big Bill's" first of several Wimbys.

He mentions Japanese players in his book: The Art of Lawn Tennis, e.g.: Ichija Kumagae (Chap.7,) ...and Chap.14 is titled "France and Japan".

Since Shimizu was a Davis Cup player, for his country, I went there:
http://www.daviscup.com
...
Japan "reached to the Davis Cup Final in 1921, losing to USA. It was an inaugural member of the World Group in 1981 and also competed in the top division in 1985."

It seems the Chinese Gold medals, in 2004...were only a "wake-up call," and there's a greater background in Asia than we know.

El Legenda
06-19-2007, 10:16 PM
like in every other sport, Asians will rule all.

yeah i can see the Asians rule basketball, baseball, football, boxing, soccer, what else?

silverwhite
06-19-2007, 10:27 PM
yeah i can see the Asians rule basketball, baseball, football, boxing, soccer, what else?

Do you understand the use of the future tense? :wavey:

Richard_from_Cal
06-19-2007, 10:43 PM
yeah i can see the Asians rule basketball, baseball, football, boxing, soccer, what else?
What sports/tennis analyst said: "Tennis is 90% mental."???

That said, grinding it out, on clay, is where a determined ...even if small, and "underweight" pro, should shine. Remember Muster's #1 ranking? (He didn't even think he was going to be #1, before it happened.---)

Marcelo Rios, ("Mental Midget," according to Tony Roche, I believe) made it to #1, in the world.

Question, is: are there well-placed, well-funded societies, or families, who/which can support an endeavor like Tennis? [Japan and Thailand <and Cambodia> are Royal Societies.--Red China is not, and should be discounted. Whatever the ATP/Olympic Committee have done, it really doesn't seem to, have "legs."] :tape:

Black Adam
06-19-2007, 10:48 PM
Asia will become a green gas pollution powerhouse. Few people there are interested in tennis. Too bad, especially in China with Master Cup on their turf, more people could make efforts to play tennis rather than stick to less popular events like Ping Pong or Badminton.

Stensland
06-19-2007, 10:50 PM
i'm not sure about this, but what about the fact that most asians are pretty small people? pls don't get me wrong about this, this is not meant in any offensive way, but where i live in germany there is a population of about 100-150 asians (vietnamese, chinese, japanese, thai) and most of them seem to be like at least 20cm smaller than me, and i'm not really one of the big ones out here (like 1,83 cm). i guess that makes it hard for them to compete for example in tennis, where most of the top guys out there are at least 1,85 or something like that.

Jimnik
06-20-2007, 01:29 AM
Japs, Thais and Vietnamese are shorter but not the Chinese and I agree that height is clearly becoming more important in tennis. We all like to imagine that loads of Oly Rochuses can make it into the top 100 without the big power game but he's exceptionally talented and you need to be at that height.

I don't know how much free will is involved here, I've read loads of stories of how Chinese children are forced to play sports and other activities in an effort to boost China's medal count at the Olympics. But it seems to me that Eastern girls are far more ambitious and determined to succeed and it's resulted in the WTA being taken over by Russians and Chinese.

The same is not true for the ATP because men, by nature, have always been ambitious no matter which country they come from so it's much harder for China to catch up. But eventually I believe they will because more courts will be built and more people will be able to afford rackets and club memberships. Many aspects of Western lifestyle, including sports, will infiltrate the country and interest at least a minority of the one billion strong population.

Stensland
06-20-2007, 02:28 AM
Many aspects of Western lifestyle, including sports, will infiltrate the country and interest at least a minority of the one billion strong population.

yep, i think that may be the striking point: they have looooads of human capital. they'll never catch up per capita with the west, but when you got like 1.6 billion people as a "reserve", some of them must eventually come through and make it onto the world's tennis courts. i mean, just think about the fact that in china for example every year 450.000 engineers graduate from their universities. :speakles:

that is not much per capita, but overall it's simply frightening. and just imagine what this ratio would be like if you put it in atp perspective...:scratch:

just crazy...

CmonAussie
06-20-2007, 03:16 AM
i'm not sure about this, but what about the fact that most asians are pretty small people? pls don't get me wrong about this, this is not meant in any offensive way, but where i live in germany there is a population of about 100-150 asians (vietnamese, chinese, japanese, thai) and most of them seem to be like at least 20cm smaller than me, and i'm not really one of the big ones out here (like 1,83 cm). i guess that makes it hard for them to compete for example in tennis, where most of the top guys out there are at least 1,85 or something like that.


:wavey:
Your point about height is becoming less & less of an issue;)
...
Young Chinese & young Koreans are increasingly eating red meat plus dairy rich foods..
The height of boys especially is going up markedly-> within a decade it looks like the East will have caught up with the West in terms of average heights..
BTW, the average height of Americans hasn`t changed since the 1950s~~ so there`s evidence that Western societies have already peaked in terms of average heights. Meanwhile China/Korea is catching up fast;)

Here in Japan the situation is a little different because young people still eat more fish than meat [including myself].. Then the average height of young Japanese is increasing but not at the same rate as Chinese/Koreans..


With China`s huge population there are more men over 1.85m than in Spain/Argentina combined. Yet Spain/Argentina has dozens of top-100 tennis players.. So I think the issue becomes less about height & more about economics + access to tennis/courts/coaching etc. from a young age [plus of course the popularity of tennis]:cool: :angel:

Stensland
06-20-2007, 03:23 AM
good point, cmonaussie. you live in japan, right? so you must have better insight than me or other people living in the western world. :)

but what i find striking then: how come the mentioned 100-150 asians living around my hometown just keep shrinking? i mean, there's tons of meat to buy and eat over here, do they just ignore it? :scratch: it's all about the meat, right?

you know, most of their parents who came here initially are bigger than their children. anyways, that's pretty off topic, sorry.

Oliboyz
06-20-2007, 03:37 AM
I'm in Thailand ... My height is around 170cm. I can consider myself that I'm a bit short for people in my age.. coz I can see some of people here are around 175-180 for the this generation and next generation. but if compare with people who are older than me... my height is ok. so...i don't think the height and weight are not a problem. but in thailand, tennis can be consider a sport for people who quite rich. So I think it's more like economic problem. ( sorry if my english is not good)

CmonAussie
06-20-2007, 03:42 AM
good point, cmonaussie. you live in japan, right? so you must have better insight than me or other people living in the western world. :)

but what i find striking then: how come the mentioned 100-150 asians living around my hometown just keep shrinking? i mean, there's tons of meat to buy and eat over here, do they just ignore it? :scratch: it's all about the meat, right?

you know, most of their parents who came here initially are bigger than their children. anyways, that's pretty off topic, sorry.


:wavey: :cool:
Rrrainer:)
Yeah I`m not sure about the Asian communities near your place but perhaps German weather [rainy/cloudy] stunts their growth:confused: [joke;) ].

Yeah I live in Japan & there certainly are plenty of boys above 1.85m but the thing is the tall boys are generally more interested in other sports [baseball, soccer, basketball, volleyball]:sad:

China/Korea has the meat/dairy food rich diet going on but again the popularity of tennis still isn`t attracting enough of the taller guys.

Culture also has a big influence;)
...
Many Japanese junior players who I`ve met are still hedging their bets~~ with plans to go to University/College if their tennis aspirations don`t work out:eek:

Basically Japanese like to play it safe & rarely fully commit to tennis because of the fear factor [fear of failure]:sad:
Of course this is true Worldwide but especially the Japanese I`ve met seem reluctant to follow their dreams all the way... unless it`s baseball [where the sport has a stronghold in Japan & financial backing]:eek:

Stensland
06-20-2007, 03:51 AM
but there are training facilities in japan, right? i mean, as far as i know japan's the second richest country in the world, so there must be enough money to back up amazing tennis training centers, even IF the sport doesn't have a huge following. you know, sailing or whatever nich sport there is in any developed country also doesn't have a fan base that is THAT large, but nonetheless those sports are dominated by the developed countries because of their financial backing. and i must admit: i am actually quite puzzled when it comes to japan and tennis. tokyo's always been such a great tournament, yet all they hav to offer is takao suzuki and that lot. they must be kidding me...

and i cannot believe that japanese guys like to play it even MORE safe than germans. we (as people) rarely take risks, but nonetheless we've had some success. now, germany's got half the population of japan. how is it even possible that japan's elite players are easily outnumbered by (excuse my french) rather crappy countries like ecuador, latvia or romania? that is just stunning.

BlakeorHenman
06-20-2007, 04:00 AM
In 100 years the top ten will all be asian. And so will the rest of us...

CmonAussie
06-20-2007, 04:06 AM
but there are training facilities in japan, right? i mean, as far as i know japan's the second richest country in the world, so there must be enough money to back up amazing tennis training centers, even IF the sport doesn't have a huge following. you know, sailing or whatever nich sport there is in any developed country also doesn't have a fan base that is THAT large, but nonetheless those sports are dominated by the developed countries because of their financial backing. and i must admit: i am actually quite puzzled when it comes to japan and tennis. tokyo's always been such a great tournament, yet all they hav to offer is takao suzuki and that lot. they must be kidding me...

and i cannot believe that japanese guys like to play it even MORE safe than germans. we (as people) rarely take risks, but nonetheless we've had some success. now, germany's got half the population of japan. how is it even possible that japan's elite players are easily outnumbered by (excuse my french) rather crappy countries like ecuador, latvia or romania? that is just stunning.


Yeah this is very interesting;)
...
I`ve been in Japan 4-years now & tried my best to understand the country [intensive language courses & plenty of Japanese friends]~~ yet I still can`t make sense of it:confused:

I do believe that many Japanese have an inferiority complex when it comes to competing with the West in sports:sad:

In baseball/golf/swimming/marathons the Japanese have enjoyed quite a bit of success in the last 10-years so the `inferiority complex` is becoming less of an issue;) ..

However Japan has hardly produced any champion male tennis players~> the closest they came was Matsuoka Shizuoka in the mid-1990s [he won one ATP title & reached QF at Wimbledon]!!

Kimiko Date`s success on the WTA in the 1990s began a bit of tennis boom among Japanese women, though they`ve failed to unnearth another talent to equal her success [Sugiama Ai has been #1 doubles player though]:cool:


Basically Japan`s male tennis players have suffered for whatever reason: poor coaching, lack of dedication/desperation/self belief, & the height issue you raised...

###
One of the ironic things about Japan`s tennis problems is that tennis is very popular for Junior High School kids here;) ... From the age of 12-years old nearly every kid has the opportunity to play tennis [most schools have 3-4 tennis courts & they train hard after school 2-hours daily]...

Japan remains an enigma:confused::devil: :angel:

CmonAussie
06-20-2007, 04:12 AM
..
PS.
I forgot to mention Japanese kids play a lot of `Soft Tennis`~~ which uses a smaller racquet head & obviously a softer ball [rubber only]!!

The technique for playing Soft Tennis is slightly different & probably messes with the kids strokes ~~ so those with aspirations for becoming pros have already bad habbits fixed from years of playing a different type of tennis!!

They should abolish Soft Tennis & adapt the the regular variety played Worldwide!

Stensland
06-20-2007, 04:21 AM
Yeah this is very interesting;)
...
I`ve been in Japan 4-years now & tried my best to understand the country [intensive language courses & plenty of Japanese friends]~~ yet I still can`t make sense of it:confused:

I do believe that many Japanese have an inferiority complex when it comes to competing with the West in sports:sad:


interesting that you mention that. i was going to raise another issue that always comes to mind when i think about japan (though this one might be a little far out to some extent ;) ): i always get the feeling that japan's got a culture of "losing face". if you lose in sports, business, anywhere -> you're an "outlaw", you're stigmatized.
i heard from a friend of mine who has been studying law for a year and a half in osaka that loads of lawyers in japan, if they lose cases (or even worse: there are cases against THEM, for fraud, illegal charging or anything like that), they are likely to committ suicide. :rolleyes:
i didn't believe it until i heard the amazingly high suicide rate of japan, and most of them are highly educated, like the post minister a couple of weeks ago.
so apparently (to me, at leat) there's a pretty harsh climate over there. failures are not tolerated. is this true to any extent? maybe that's why the japanese don't even try tennis. any other job would've give them more security, cause, let's face it, there are many more failed tennis players out there than we'd ever imagine. committing too much is also a little crazy; i guess my dad wouldn't have let me go to bolletieri neither. ;)
(not that i had the talent, though... :D )


In baseball/golf/swimming/marathons the Japanese have enjoyed quite a bit of success in the last 10-years so the `inferiority complex` is becoming less of an issue;) ..


yeah, i was gonna mention all the baseball players in the mlb too. those guys are pretty much up and coming, signed some big deals in the u.s.


###
One of the ironic things about Japan`s tennis problems is that tennis is very popular for Junior High School kids here;) ... From the age of 12-years old nearly every kid has the opportunity to play tennis [most schools have 3-4 tennis courts & they train hard after school 2-hours daily]...


seems a little like the soccer problem in the united states: you play it for fun, but once you're "aging" (=going to college), you're pretty much asked to do real sports, no kiddie sports like soccer. ;)

CmonAussie
06-20-2007, 04:58 AM
interesting that you mention that. i was going to raise another issue that always comes to mind when i think about japan (though this one might be a little far out to some extent ;) ): i always get the feeling that japan's got a culture of "losing face". if you lose in sports, business, anywhere -> you're an "outlaw", you're stigmatized.
i heard from a friend of mine who has been studying law for a year and a half in osaka that loads of lawyers in japan, if they lose cases (or even worse: there are cases against THEM, for fraud, illegal charging or anything like that), they are likely to committ suicide. :rolleyes:
i didn't believe it until i heard the amazingly high suicide rate of japan, and most of them are highly educated, like the post minister a couple of weeks ago.
so apparently (to me, at leat) there's a pretty harsh climate over there. failures are not tolerated. is this true to any extent? maybe that's why the japanese don't even try tennis. any other job would've give them more security, cause, let's face it, there are many more failed tennis players out there than we'd ever imagine. committing too much is also a little crazy; i guess my dad wouldn't have let me go to bolletieri neither. ;)
(not that i had the talent, though... :D )
;)


:wavey:
:cool:
Yeah good point~~ you may have hit the nail on the head;)
...
Failure is not tolerated in Japan, especially it`s not tolerated by people themselves [each individual is their own harshest critic]..
Suicide is a big issue-> even in the Junior High Schools where I work..

I do believe there`s a general lack of confidence among Japanese people & obviously in an individual sport like tennis it`s very important to believe in yourself..

Also in Japan you`re expected to be a team player in life/family/business/sport..

Tennis is by nature a selfish sport~~ so even the kids who are super talented are reluctant to show off their skills [for fear of standing out & being bullied by their peers]..

Japanese people can be very negative towards anybody who stands out as a bit special,~even if that special quality is the talent that may help them become a World Champion..

For example Miyazato Ai [21yo Japanese female golfer] is now the most popular golfer in Japan [as much for her cuteness as her great play]~~ but while she was growing up she was bullied relentlessly by classmates/peers who resented her unique game/personality!! Thankfully Miyazato is a strong character but had she been less mentally strong then she may have succumbed & ended up another teenage suicide victim in Japan`s harsh society:eek:

Japanese also tend to romanticise suicide so people who take that path are actually put up on pedestal but those who show their talents are chopped down mercilessly:o ..

Japanese culture sometimes depresses me yet I still love the country:sad: :angel:

Stensland
06-20-2007, 05:07 AM
Japanese also tend to romanticise suicide so people who take that path are actually put up on pedestal but those who show their talents are chopped down mercilessly:o ..


suicide with dignity is sepuku or something like that, right? :unsure:

it is one crazy country you live in, aussie. what took you there btw? all the documentations about the japan that are shown over here in tv turn me off pretty much. not culture-wise, but more because of the extemely crowded cities. i prefer space. :wavey:

anyways, thanks for the "live"-reportings mate. :)

CmonAussie
06-20-2007, 05:47 AM
suicide with dignity is sepuku or something like that, right? :unsure:

it is one crazy country you live in, aussie. what took you there btw? all the documentations about the japan that are shown over here in tv turn me off pretty much. not culture-wise, but more because of the extemely crowded cities. i prefer space. :wavey:

anyways, thanks for the "live"-reportings mate. :)


:cool: Japan has a lot of beautiful aspects as well;)
..Sure the cities are crowded but there`s a surprising amount of natural beauty here too;)

If you ever come to Japan please visit Kyushu [the Southernmost of the 4-main islands].
Kyushu has some magnificent mountains, rocky/semi-jungle gorges, volcanoes & spectacular coastline..
Of course Japan`s shrines & temples are gorgeous & often surrounded by trees nearly a thousand years old:cool:

Initially I came to Japan to teach English, it`s quite common for Australians to work in Japan for a year or two-- in my case I just decided to stay & work on my 2nd language skills etc. Japan`s an addictive place for many who come here~~ you`ll either want to stay for a long time or jump on the next plane home.
I definitely recommend you pay Japan a visit someday:) .. Just don`t expect the Japanese to produce any tennis champions in the near future:sad:

tennis2tennis
06-20-2007, 06:57 AM
I feel the same way about Africa ...a continant that has soooooo much potential, with the exception of a couple of Moroccans and South Africans I can't remember ever seeing Sudanese, Nigerian or Angolan players on tv...

Stensland
06-20-2007, 07:54 AM
I feel the same way about Africa ...a continant that has soooooo much potential, with the exception of a couple of Moroccans and South Africans I can't remember ever seeing Sudanese, Nigerian or Angolan players on tv...

yeah but you can't really compare the two continents. africa's even lost on economic and social terms as of now, how in the world would you expect a posh sport like tennis to flourish down there then?

tennis2tennis
06-20-2007, 08:32 AM
yeah but you can't really compare the two continents. africa's even lost on economic and social terms as of now, how in the world would you expect a posh sport like tennis to flourish down there then?
I know i'm talking about potential

Fedexex
06-20-2007, 07:26 PM
i can atm only hope..

Richard_from_Cal
06-20-2007, 10:21 PM
It comes down to perception. If I have (as I guess I do, somewhat) a limited history of the game, I'll think that there are/have been, fewer Asians in it, than perhaps are and/or have been.

Who's the sexy...oh, yeah: Sania Mirza.

If I was going to do an "apologetic(s)" of Asian Tennis, I might start with Davis Cup history. (When a country got into the Davis Cup competition,...etc.-)

I feel the same way about Africa ...a continant that has soooooo much potential, with the exception of a couple of Moroccans and South Africans I can't remember ever seeing Sudanese, Nigerian or Angolan players on tv...
Nduka Odizor...comes to mind.

Experimentee
06-21-2007, 06:07 PM
Womens doubles in particular have definitely seen the rise of Asians, with Chinese pairs winning the Olympic gold and Grand Slams. Also on the rise is the Taiwanese pair of Chan/Chuang.

There are more talented Asians coming up in womens singles too since the first post, especially the Chinese.

However you are right that mens tennis has not taken these strides. Perhaps tennis is just not a popular sport for males in Asia, or size is a problem.

Stensland
09-16-2009, 05:53 AM
*bump*

can somebody update me on this bhambri guy from india? he's ruling the juniors at the moment. what is he like? strengths/weaknesses?

CmonAussie
09-16-2009, 06:00 AM
...
thanks for the `bump` Rrrainer(:
>>
yeah i thought Nishikori was going to continue his great 2008 and get close to the Top-20 this year, alas the injuries kept coming~~ now his career is in doubt><!
>>
Bhambri, we know he won AO 2009, #1 junior, and seems to have the height and whip like arms to be a true force, though since none of the matches were televised i don`t know any more.. so hope someone can inform us""!

Stensland
09-16-2009, 06:07 AM
apparently he's with bollettieri, so he's taking his career fairly seriously. :)

he lost to buchanan at the uso, the guy who got killed by tsonga in round 1 - which means bhambri will definitely have to hit the gym if he wants to make it to the pros. :D

duong
09-16-2009, 08:03 AM
he lost to buchanan at the uso, the guy who got killed by tsonga in round 1 - which means bhambri will definitely have to hit the gym if he wants to make it to the pros. :D

he's more than one year younger than Buchanan (he's same generation as Tomic, Krajinovic, Harrison).

Bhambri has won 4 futures this year not taking part in more than 10 of them. That's a very good start for such a young player.

What's his height now ? In my data, he was quite short comparing to the other players of his generation who are tall indeed (Tomic, Krajinovic esp).

EDIT : I saw 1.83 m here :

http://www.tennistalk.com/fr/joueur/profil/Yuki_Bhambri

that's a correct size, taller than in my previous data (1.70 m, 45 kg :lol: !)

Stensland
09-16-2009, 08:08 AM
yeah, he doesn't look short on these pics either:

http://nickspicks1.files.wordpress.com/2008/07/yukibhambri3.jpg

http://nickspicks1.files.wordpress.com/2008/12/jlc_4803.jpg

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3252/2680506162_495013763b.jpg

shorter than dent though, but i think he's probably still growing (don't know when that pic was taken).

Arkulari
09-16-2009, 08:33 AM
too skinny for the pro tour, even someone like Roger had to fill up a bit to compete

Stensland
09-16-2009, 08:42 AM
yeah i was thinking the same thing. but on the other hand he reminds me of cilic.

Har-Tru
09-16-2009, 10:28 AM
too thin.

Ad Wim
09-16-2009, 10:35 AM
The remarkable thing is that he has hardly played any challenger this year, unlike guys like Krajinovic, Harrison and Tomic. He hardly gets a WC etiher, strange...

And too thin? Look at all these guys from 16/17, no one is big and muscular, but they all get their wins.

duong
09-16-2009, 01:26 PM
The remarkable thing is that he has hardly played any challenger this year, unlike guys like Krajinovic, Harrison and Tomic. He hardly gets a WC etiher, strange...

he chose mostly to play futures in India, that's his choice, they all made different choices (for instance, Tomic didn't play a future at all, maybe to protest against ITF's suspension decision),

and I don't think it's easier to play challengers.

But the fact is that Bhambri's success was remarkable in these Indian futures : he won 4 of them, and I guess he played maybe 2 more or something like that.

And these futures don't have such a bad level : I could see some players in these draws who are quite good.

CmonAussie
02-01-2010, 05:12 AM
...
...
With Li Na & Jie Zheng both making the SFs on the women`s side it seems that China is poised to make a big push on the women`s game! ~~However there doesn`t seem to be much promise on the men`s side, apart from Yuki Bambri [of India])""(

fran70
02-06-2010, 01:49 AM
What about with Chinese players like Ze Zhang and Di Wu? Did anyone see them playing? Zhang reached this week the final of Israel F1. I know that doesn`t mean that much but as China is looking forward to take the place of the Australian Open in 2016 (Under my opinion it`s an insult to the tradition of tennis if something like that would happen!) I guess that Chinese are desesperately looking forward to have competitive men players on the tour (Right now they managed to position Jie Zheng and Li Na on the semis of 2010 AO which meeans a lot)

CmonAussie
05-25-2010, 03:18 PM
...
...
What a great couple of days for the Japanese.!
Yesterday Kei Nishikori won his first slam match since 2008, by coming back from 2-sets down in a 5-set thriller<"">!
Then today 40 year old Kimiko Date defeated Safina in 3 sets, winning her first slam match since 1996 [14 years]!!

Zirconek
05-25-2010, 04:09 PM
What about with Chinese players like Ze Zhang and Di Wu? Did anyone see them playing? Zhang reached this week the final of Israel F1. I know that doesn`t mean that much but as China is looking forward to take the place of the Australian Open in 2016 (Under my opinion it`s an insult to the tradition of tennis if something like that would happen!) I guess that Chinese are desesperately looking forward to have competitive men players on the tour (Right now they managed to position Jie Zheng and Li Na on the semis of 2010 AO which meeans a lot)

Zhang was runner-up last week in Fergana Challenger. A quite depleted field there, but still a great achievement. :yeah:

DualMedia
05-25-2010, 04:09 PM
no!

chewy
05-25-2010, 04:59 PM
Zhang was runner-up last week in Fergana Challenger. A quite depleted field there, but still a great achievement. :yeah:

Ze Zhang now rank a career high of 339! I'm really looking forward to seeing more him...I wonder where's his next event.

@OP, Paradorn step on a lot of new grounds leading the men side for Asian tennis players, and there're younger players with potential now so it makes watch and following tennis more exciting for me.
I actually prefer a wide variety instead any domineering side because tennis is a great international sport.

CmonAussie
06-28-2010, 09:04 PM
...
***
Lu ousts 3-time Wimbledon finalist in 9-7 in the 5th set>> to make the quarters..!!
Lu stands a good chance against Djoko as well, then he could be the first Asian born male into the semis of a slam~~ since~~ ever??

straitup
06-28-2010, 09:08 PM
I know we don't mention women's tennis much here, but I find the Asian women's tennis players absolutely adorable...Jie Zheng, Na Li, I like them. And what a great accomplishment for Lu, a semifinal could be magical for him

Selby
06-28-2010, 09:09 PM
In 5-10 years they'll be much much much better than the USA, it'll be incomparable.

CmonAussie
06-28-2010, 09:15 PM
I know we don't mention women's tennis much here, but I find the Asian women's tennis players absolutely adorable...Jie Zheng, Na Li, I like them. And what a great accomplishment for Lu, a semifinal could be magical for him

>>
Yeah I know what you mean, Jie Zheng is too cute for words~ she`s got a great game/attitude/resume, a real trailblaizer for the Chinese women.. also i find my heart rate go up if i stare at her too long:drool::inlove:

CmonAussie
09-04-2010, 08:10 AM
...
...
Kei Nishikori [`Air Kei`] is showing signs of fireworks again(-:This year his comeback has been impressive [in fact he deserves Comeback Player of the Year ATP award]..!!
*Wins 3 challenger tourneys, wins a 5-setter @ FO, qualifies for US and wins 5-hour 5-setter against Cilic to progress to Rd.3.!! Now his ranking is close to #100 again. Wonder what more he can do before the year is out.. On corrent form i can see him passing his career peak ranking [#56] by Jan or Feb next year(-:

Topspindoctor
09-04-2010, 02:16 PM
No, and to be honest Chang was lucky to win RG and reach #2. Can you imagine if Chang played in today's era on clay? He'd get thrashed so brutally by Nadal I shudder to think about it it. He'd also get bludgeoned to death by today's big hitters/big servers on any other surface. Asian players just don't have the height, the power or the endurance of European/American players to play such a physically demanding game.

Even women's tennis is a power game now. Take the Ivanovic vs Zheng recent match for example. Zheng got brutalized by Ana's forehand, just got hit off the court with no chance at all. Speed and retrieving can only take you so far.

misty1
09-04-2010, 03:00 PM
I just dont ever see asian players dominating the tour because while they deleop the other countries are also developing, they arent staying still and so the asian countries will almost always be in a kind of catch up.

Asian countries can be competitive but they wont be a powerhouse

CmonAussie
02-02-2011, 08:48 AM
...
This year`s Aussie Open was a pretty good one for Asian tennis: >>LI NA comes within a few games of becoming the 1st Asian born player to win a singles slam, Nishikori becomes the 1st Japanese male in 40 years to reach the 3rd round, and the legendary Paes-Bhupathi combo from India reform~ making it all the way to the final.
***
What lies ahead for the rest of 2011? >>Predict Nishikori to crack the Top-20"-"!

Jimnik
06-04-2011, 04:23 PM
Why is there such a gulf between ATP and WTA success in China?

How long before the Peoples Republic produces a slam champion on the men's side?

feuselino
06-04-2011, 04:47 PM
It would be nice to have a few good Chinese players soon, I really ask myself why they have so much trouble, especially since they are almost unbeatable in ping-pong and also excellent in badminton... of course they are different sports, but let's say the affinity to raquet sports is definitly there... and with the average Chinese having more and more disposable income, you'd think Tennis has gotten much more attention recently... anyone know an interesting article about the backgrounds of Chinese tennis, maybe? Much appreciated!

Lurking
06-04-2011, 05:07 PM
It would be nice to have a few good Chinese players soon, I really ask myself why they have so much trouble, especially since they are almost unbeatable in ping-pong and also excellent in badminton... of course they are different sports, but let's say the affinity to raquet sports is definitly there... and with the average Chinese having more and more disposable income, you'd think Tennis has gotten much more attention recently... anyone know an interesting article about the backgrounds of Chinese tennis, maybe? Much appreciated!

Depth isn't there globally in those sports and they have been winning world titles in those sports since the 80's.

It's easy to profile athletes for the minor Olympic sports, it's a damn sight harder in the major western sports when throwing money at it has been tried all over the world.

out_here_grindin
06-04-2011, 05:53 PM
Why is there such a gulf between ATP and WTA success in China?

How long before the Peoples Republic produces a slam champion on the men's side?

There aren't even any good prospects for the top 100 at the moment. Taiwan has better men's players right now.


In Chinese culture women are pressured to be great athletes more than men, which is much different than the rest of the world. A lot of their many olympic medals come from womens diving,womens gymnastics and other womens sports. Young Chinese girls are put into athletics younger and are trained more intensely than young boys. The young boys who take sports seriously are the ones who are not seen as academically brilliant. That is often the #1 priority for a Chinese male, to be brilliant academically. Women are not seen the same and are often turned more to sports.
This is also why China had a world class womens soocer team while their mens team struggles to make the final round of world cup qualifying.

TennisOnWood
06-04-2011, 05:58 PM
Horde from the bloody East coming :o

We can expect army of yellow players in next few years

MaxPower
06-04-2011, 06:02 PM
yeah also asked myself why Asia isn't doing better when they are so excellent in other racket sports. Li Na has used european coach used by other top players and that helped her game. They need their talents to get the best european coaches and maybe place their best talents in european tennis academies. That could leapfrog the development.

Another reason could obviously be that in this era of "physical tennis" it is harder to find tall, strong and fast asian talents compared to finding tall strong european/south american/american talents. I know Asia has a lot of tall and strong ppl too just from the sheer amount of people but maybe they are attracted to other sports like basketball, volleyball etc.

CmonAussie
06-07-2011, 10:22 AM
Why is there such a gulf between ATP and WTA success in China?

How long before the Peoples Republic produces a slam champion on the men's side?

...
Thanks for the bump Jimnik:cool:
...
Yeah, my theory about the gulf between mens and womens tennis in China is~ the image of the sport hasn`t been promoted enough towards men. At the moment I live in Japan, which though quite different from China does share some common themes with regards to how tennis is perceived in both countries. Tennis is seen as somewhat of a girly sport~ with poster girls like Sharapova getting huge coverage, while the mens has been given less attention. Of course that attitude has been changing but still the most gifted athletes in Japan have been steered towards baseball and soccer, while in China they have been steered towards soccer and basketball.
Nishikori is making some waves in Japan~ but he needs to do something dramatic, like reach the semis at a slam, to really catch the publics imagination (and perhaps inspire some boys here to take up tennis);)

JolánGagó
06-07-2011, 10:39 AM
No.

Next please.

bokehlicious
06-07-2011, 10:40 AM
No. Spain is bound to dominate every sport for the next millenium.

JolánGagó
06-07-2011, 10:59 AM
Yes.

Next please.

Johnny Groove
01-06-2012, 04:22 PM
With Project 45 out of the way with regards to Nishikori, along with Go Soeda excellent week and Yuichi Sugita's big balls vs. Almagro, has Japan got themselves a formidable Davis Cup team? Will all 3 guys rise into the top 50 or better by the end of the year?

misty1
01-06-2012, 05:42 PM
no, they will not all rise to the top 50 by years end

hopefully sugita can build on the performance he gave today v.s almagro. Top 100 by years end might be stretching it though

as for soeda this is more than likely nothing more than a one tournament run from him

i do think , with the confidence these men gain though that japan will be dangerous in davis cup this year

fran70
01-10-2012, 12:38 AM
Tennis is an expensive sport to learn. That is the biggest reason why few Asians are groomed to become a pro from childhood. Michael Chang has already proven than asians can play tennis. Too bad he lost to Sampras in US open. And he never became #1. He was very close, very close. Too bad that he played right along Sampras during his prime years.

Hyung Taik Lee is a Korean player who is doing decent on the tour, but he cannot compete against top players. Srichaphan, the Thai player is much better and has the potential to win a big one. Let's hope that he does well in Wimbledon and US.

Chang was an US investment from the very beggining and all the credit was for them.

Horatio Caine
01-28-2012, 01:25 PM
I know it is only a challenger, but there are three Japanese players in the SF of the Honolulu challenger - Soeda, Ito and Sugita.

Add to that Nishikori's fine QF run at the Australian Open, which will put him very close to a place inside the top 20...

And that is only Japan.

India has Devvarman, although few other players are coming through. Bhambri is perhaps the most promising, but he has some way to go yet.

If you can count Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan (as far as world geography is concerned), they have Golubev and Kukushkin, and Istomin respectively.

Taipei have Lu, and Jimmy Wang is on the comeback.

Jimnik makes an interesting point about the huge difference in success of Chinese WTA players and ATP players. Certainly it looks like it will be some time before we see any Chinese males break into the ATP level, which is a little surprising considering the size of their country and their investment in sport. Some players have said kind words about Di Wu, so maybe he is one to look out for.