Wayne Ferreira: 55 consecutive Grand Slam appearances [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Wayne Ferreira: 55 consecutive Grand Slam appearances

Neely
05-25-2004, 10:42 PM
[former title of this thread as of May 26th: Wayne Ferreira draws equal with Edberg's record for the most consecutive Grand Slams]

new title: Wayne Ferreira: 55 consecutive Grand Slam appearances
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Despite losing today to Austria's Jürgen Melzer, the South African veteran Wayne Ferreira equalled Stefan Edberg's mark of consecutive appearances in Grand Slams, a run which stretches back to the 1991 Australian Open.

Both, Edberg and Ferreira, have played 54 successive Grand Slam tournaments.

Ferreira will probably break Edberg's record at Wimbledon! WOW!

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lol :lol: I know that here are likely not many Ferreira fans on the board (or are there? :wavey: ) and I wouldn't call Ferreira one of my favorite players either, but nevertheless I wanted to post his streak because I always have tons of respect for such a veteran like him (or Todd Martin) who is playing for so many years on the tour and he also had some nice achievements in his career earlier even though his current form of late 2003 and 2004 is quite bad! :rolleyes:

also it's quite an effort never being injured at the time of Grand Slams for 54 times in a row! ;)

In all these 54 Grand Slams, Wayne Ferreira has just two semifinal appearances in Grand Slams (both at AO) as his best result but he has won 15 singles titles on four different surfaces (grass, carpet, hardcourt, clay).

And last but not least, not many players had 13 meetings with Pete Sampras and could win 6 of them. Trailing Pete in h2h just 6-7 is not too bad either and quite significant ;)

Actually there are only some players I know and who have a positive and significant (not just1, 2, 3 or 4 encounters) record against Pete. Such as Richard Krajicek, Michael Stich, Marat Safin and Lleyton Hewitt. So Ferreira did quite well in that :yeah: ;) :D

WaynesWorld
05-27-2004, 08:44 PM
Thanks Neely for posting Wayne´s record here ;)
I´ve just posted it in the Wayne-Thread ( Player-Forums ) before I found it here :angel:
Yeah, it´s really a great thing that Wayne played 54 Grand Slams in a row!!
And I´m really looking forward to Wimbledon where he can and hopefully will break Stefan´s record :bounce: :clap2:
He´s such a great guy and he really earns a lot of respect.
And yeah, he always played great against Pete! I just wish he could beat Andre just one time before he retires...

Chloe le Bopper
05-27-2004, 11:58 PM
I was sort of under the impression that this record was the only reason he bothered this year, and that he plans to retire after the USO. Truth or not?

TennisLurker
05-28-2004, 12:04 AM
I thought I was his only fan here.

Watching wayne destroying players like sampras or philippoussis always gives me great pleasure, his return of serve is amazing.

also wish he could beat andre at least once, agassi and chang were the only big players he could never beat.

Neely
05-28-2004, 10:03 AM
wooohoooo http://www.mysmilie.de/smilies/froehlich/img/010.gif.... yeah, already 3 responses for this great veteran :)

Rebecca, I think you are right that he plans to retire after this season. But I had the impression that I could read between your lines that you think he is just playing for this record and not for winning matches anymore. Hm, I'm not sure about it. I think if he had the chance to win matches he would do it, but at the end of such a long career there can be a kind of letdown as well and maybe you have a stretch when you're arriving at a certain point where you just cannot do anymore all the things needed to win :shrug: I don't know....

TennisLurker, you're absolutely right. I looked up his records against Chang and Agassi: 0-7 and 0-11 :eek:

well, I wish him the best and a few wins for the rest of the season. :bounce:

Horatio Caine
05-28-2004, 10:29 AM
Only one word to describe this feat - incredible!

WaynesWorld
05-28-2004, 11:05 AM
Coooool, quite a few posts here already ;)
I don´t think that Wayne is just playing for this record this year. He´s not the type for doing that because he loves his sport and he always wants to give his best. But on the other side he probably wants to spend more time with his family and so it really seems like he will retire after the US Open :sad: I read this in some interviews, but you never know. I still hope he will change his mind, maybe if he wins some great matches... ;)

@TennisLurker: Good to know that there´s another fan of Wayne here ;) :bigclap:

Neely
06-22-2004, 09:04 PM
and the magic number is 55 :cool: :smoke: :smoke: :smoke:


also mentionable is that he didn't just show up, but even managed to get a win against Ljubicic who was injured towards the end of the match.

Ferreira wins 5-7 7-6 (5) 7-5 6-2

http://www.mysmilie.de/smilies/froehlich/img/010.gifhttp://www.mysmilie.de/smilies/froehlich/img/010.gif

Leo
06-22-2004, 09:23 PM
So the record is broken?

Congrats Wayne. :)

TennisLurker
06-22-2004, 10:03 PM
congrats wayne!

Satanic Pasteur
06-22-2004, 10:10 PM
:worship: Wayne :worship:

He played his first slam as a qualifier at Wimbledon 1990 where he defeated Noah before losing second round and began his streak at Melbourne the following year where he reached last 16.

WaynesWorld
06-22-2004, 10:10 PM
Congratulations Wayne!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :worship: :bounce: :clap2: :bigclap:
So great that he broke the record now!!! :banana:

Chloe le Bopper
06-22-2004, 11:44 PM
wooohoooo http://www.mysmilie.de/smilies/froehlich/img/010.gif.... yeah, already 3 responses for this great veteran :)

Rebecca, I think you are right that he plans to retire after this season. But I had the impression that I could read between your lines that you think he is just playing for this record and not for winning matches anymore. Hm, I'm not sure about it. I think if he had the chance to win matches he would do it, but at the end of such a long career there can be a kind of letdown as well and maybe you have a stretch when you're arriving at a certain point where you just cannot do anymore all the things needed to win :shrug: I don't know....

In all due respect... no, you can't read between my lines ;) Well, you can, but your reading was not correct - in this case.

I was not implying that he wasn't trying to win anymore. I was implying that the reason he's still motivated to play is to break the record. That was all. If there was no record to be had, I'm not sure he would still be playing right now. But certainly he tries to win matches still, he is a professional, afterall :)

Lee
06-22-2004, 11:50 PM
Congrat Wayne. That's a great record.

YoursTruly
06-23-2004, 03:30 AM
Wayne is such a talented player. He's always a feared opponent but he really should be ranked higher for how much talent he has. Ask Pete! :lol:

Denise
06-23-2004, 04:51 AM
55 apparences in grand slam?? congrats wayne.. you're very funny :lol:

chris whiteside
06-23-2004, 06:05 AM
Thankfully I can hardly remember any of them. My personal opinion is that he is a whinger and a bore.

Satanic Pasteur
06-23-2004, 11:19 AM
W. Ferreira Interview
Tuesday, June 22, 2004


THE MODERATOR: Wayne Ferreira for you.

Q. Maybe you didn't get everything you might have wanted out of this 15‑year odyssey, maybe a Grand Slam title would have been nice, but from the day you beat Yannick to setting a record here today, will you walk away from the game in September completely fulfilled?

WAYNE FERREIRA: I think I will, yeah. I mean, I do obviously have regrets that I didn't win or get to a final. I felt there were some years that I had a really good chance, and deserved to, and didn't. You know, but there have been good ones. I've had a great time.

I really can't complain. I've loved what I've been doing. It been a lot of fun. It's sad that it has to come to an end sometime. I wish I could keep going.

Q. How exciting was that first victory here?

WAYNE FERREIRA: Gee, my first Grand Slam ever to play Yannick Noah, Court 2, couldn't have been any better, couldn't have been a better start to a great career than that.

Q. If you had to have a sweetest memory or two of your career, what would you point to one or possibly two sweetest moments?

WAYNE FERREIRA: Well, I think the Noah one was a good one. I remember my quarterfinals in Australia against McEnroe. I remember two matches I had here against Courier and Todd Martin in the quarters that I lost that were tough matches that I felt I could have won.

Q. And how about the Olympics or even LA?

WAYNE FERREIRA: Well, I mean, outside of Grand Slams, there's been plenty. I mean, the Olympics, you know, was fantastic. It's the first time anyone had won a medal for our country I think in 32, 36 years. You know, I got a lot of credit back home. People started, you know, to really get into the Olympic thing again, which was great.

I've had some ‑‑ you know, beating Lleyton Hewitt in the finals of Stuttgart the one year when things weren't going that well for me and I was thinking about packing it in back then. So, you know, there's been some good times, they're been some bad ones. But I have a lot of great memories.

It's hard to say what one is the best one when a lot of them had different meanings.

Q. Where does this record stand for you in terms of your achievements?

WAYNE FERREIRA: Well, probably it would have to be one of my best ‑ maybe the best, you know, it's not something that I started out at the beginning of my career and said, "Well, this is what I'm going to end off doing." It came a couple of years ago. And then I felt like, "Wow, actually it's not a bad thing." The last maybe two or three Grand Slams, a lot of the players have been, you know, congratulating me and saying that they think it's a great thing. A lot of them have thought about how long it would take them to get to this, and they laugh a lot. You know, some of them look for like 10 years more.

So it's created a little bit of a laugh. You know, a lot of them have a little respect for me in a sense they know how difficult it is to stay healthy for this amount of time.

Q. What is the closest you came to having the streak broken?

WAYNE FERREIRA: Last year here probably was the closest I've come. It was the only year that if I wasn't probably going for this, I would not have played. Even though I did lose in the first round, I didn't lose because of the injury. I actually recovered pretty well from it. I just didn't ‑‑ wasn't able to hit a ball until I played my match, so I was a little out of practice and had a tough first round.

But that one, I think if there wasn't anything on it, I probably would have given myself a little bit more time to recover.

Q. Out of the current African players, could you pick one that could maybe win a Grand Slam one day?

WAYNE FERREIRA: No, I really can't, not at this stage.

Q. No one appeals to you at all?

WAYNE FERREIRA: No, no. There's a lot of work that needs to be done ‑ a lot. It's going to take some time.

Q. I think you were quoted in one of the papers today saying that tennis has been a real grind for you at times, and that it hasn't been fun. Is that recently? What is your kind of perspective on it all right now?

WAYNE FERREIRA: It's been a struggle. I mean, it's like anything, you know, it's not always easy. When you don't do well, it's difficult. When you start to have other things going in your life, you know, family who need you at home a lot, it makes it tougher. The motivation, it's always difficult. You know, I've been playing for so long, it's so hard to be motivated day in and day out.



I think the mistake I made when I was younger, I played too much, too many tournaments, I didn't really focus enough on the big ones and try to make my schedules better. So I got to some stages where I was so burnt out of playing that it was pretty difficult to get motivated. And then later on in my career when I got married and had kids, I had a kid, you know, that was a little bit of pressure, wanting to be home and stay at home. So that was tough to get motivated for that. So there's been various things.



Look, it hasn't been easy by any means. There's been a lot of times ‑‑ there's probably been three times in my career that I've really, really wanted to retire, and just felt, "Well, you know, let's give it maybe three or four months and try really hard in those months and see what happens." Every time those three or four months, I've started playing really well and started enjoying it again, so it kept me going.

Q. Where is tennis on your happy meter right now? Are you way down on it?

WAYNE FERREIRA: It's second. My family's first, and tennis is second. But, you know, it's good, though, because for the last, you know, 14 years, tennis ‑‑ well, actually since I started playing tennis or took it seriously at 12, it's always been first. And nothing's come close.

Q. When you're walking around Marin Avenue, someplace on North Side, are you completely anonymous there?

WAYNE FERREIRA: Yeah, I hide away pretty well.

Q. You like that?

WAYNE FERREIRA: I like it, yeah. I think it's nice for me. I get a good kick out of playing with the college guys. They give me a lot of respect. They enjoy me being around. The people around Berkeley, around the University that are part of the tennis know who I am, but other than that, nobody else. No, I don't mind it. I think it's nice.

Q. There are people who think that because tennis has Davis Cup for the nationalistic competition, you have the Grand Slams, that there's no place for it in the Olympics. But it sounds like for you that was clearly not the case. Can you speak to the importance of being able to have been in that Olympics as a tennis player?

WAYNE FERREIRA: I think it does depend on which country you come from. I mean, for us it was such a huge thing to be back in the Olympics that, you know, it was right there, and then it was important. But then, you know, you take a guy like Yevgeny Kafelnikov who throughout his whole career always said about how he would never play for nothing, and money was the most important thing in his life.

If you ask him now one of his greatest moments, I think he might even put the Olympics ahead of winning a Grand Slam.

You know, once you're there and once you partake in it and you're a part of it, you realize the importance of it and how big of an achievement it is to get a medal.

Q. Why do you think tennis in Africa is so problematic? Huge continent, ample resources.

WAYNE FERREIRA: I think a lot of it comes to funding, to finances. I mean, you know, South Africa is a pretty wealthy country. We struggle financially. The tennis union doesn't have any money to send the kids like I did when I was a kid. I was lucky. I got sent on squads, had proper training and coaches. Then about a couple years after I got out of the Juniors, it all went away. And they just haven't had the opportunities like I have.



I think the money is a huge importance. We don't really have it in South Africa. I think a lot of Africa has the same problem.

Q. Did your parents push you real hard to play tennis or was it the State that encouraged you to play tennis?

WAYNE FERREIRA: Nobody really. My brother played a little bit. He was four years older than me. He played a bit. He went to college and played college tennis.

I just enjoyed it. I was good at it from a fairly young age and I liked to play it. I enjoyed doing individual things. I didn't like the soccer and the cricket because I had, you know ‑‑ if I played well and we lost, you know, I always felt like I deserved to win. So that's why I took tennis because it was all about me, and I enjoyed that, being in control of my own.

Q. Grass court or clay court, does it make any difference?

WAYNE FERREIRA: I've enjoyed the grass. I've been a little bit disappointed over the years how it's changed and become more slower, more like a hard court. I wish it was quicker, as it was in the early '90s. But I still have a lot of fun coming here. It's a wonderful experience. You know, it's great to have been able to have been here in so many years.

Growing up in South Africa, this is the tournament you wanted to play in. I have a lot of great memories. I'm really going to miss coming here.

Q. Have you made up your mind about playing Los Angeles or not?

WAYNE FERREIRA: I haven't at the moment, no.

Q. If you play any tournaments between now and the US Open, that would be the one tournament?

WAYNE FERREIRA: It's the only one I've entered in, yeah.

Q. When you talk about it becoming more like a hard court, slowing it down, how have they done that? How would you explain that change?

WAYNE FERREIRA: I think the main thing is the balls are a lot slower. The guys that have very big serves are still able to serve big and get away with it. But the guys who have sort of middle serves like me that aren't that hard or placing have struggled a little bit. Not so much on the first serve, but the second serve. I remember I came here in '90, from '90 and '95, I served and volleyed every first and second serve. If you didn't, you lost, basically. Since then it's been a struggle to serve and volley on second serves. It's changed a lot.

For me it's been disappointing because I would have won a lot more matches if it had stayed that way. A lot of other people have enjoyed it more. It's given more of the clay‑courters and the baseliners more of an opportunity to do well, but it's taken away a bit of the serve and volley, which is sad, because that's what grass is for, it's supposed to be to serve and volley.

Q. Just the balls; nothing to do with the actual court?

WAYNE FERREIRA: I'm not sure if they changed the court much. I think they changed the grass sometime or other. I'm not sure if that's that much of a factor, but I'm sure it changed it a bit.

Q. You mentioned that you considered retiring three times. When in your career was that?

WAYNE FERREIRA: 2000, probably 2002, and then maybe even once back in '97, '98, for a very brief moment. But I think 2000, the year I finished ‑‑ I think I finished '99 at 53 on the ranking, which is the worst I was, I was going to give it up then, and decided to give 2000 a good go and try my best. I finished I think 13 at the end of that year.

So that was the main time that I probably would have given up if things hadn't worked out.

Q. Last time you had any communication with Stefan, either by e‑mail or telephone call?

WAYNE FERREIRA: I haven't seen him for years. I haven't.

Q. Overall do you think you're leaving the sport in better or worse shape than what you found it?

WAYNE FERREIRA: Me personally?

Q. Generally the sport, how it's changed in the time you've been.

WAYNE FERREIRA: We could sit here for hours on that one (smiling). I don't think it's that good right now. I think it needs a lot of help. I went through that whole process of trying to help it. I still think that there are people that are going to try and help it. I think it's in a bit of a struggle from a lot of aspects. Needs a lot of help. I'm not sure if I'm going to be around to do it anymore. But it definitely could do with a bit of a revamp and new ideas and try and improve it a little bit.

Q. In terms of how it's sold or how it's promoted?

WAYNE FERREIRA: In a lot of things. Most things (smiling).

WaynesWorld
06-23-2004, 12:12 PM
Thanks for posting that nice Interview Satanic Pasteur!!! :)

Gonzo Hates Me!
06-23-2004, 12:36 PM
That's awesome... not many players have the motivation, the drive, the dedication, and the body maintenance to do that



(I am glad some players can make harmless records without it being the end of the world...........................)

ys
06-23-2004, 02:55 PM
That's awesome... not many players have the motivation, the drive, the dedication, and the body maintenance to do that

A bit more of motivation would not hurt Wayne. He was one of the most talented players of the generation. Probably on par with Kafelnikov or Rafter. And he goes away as huge underachievthis record is er. But outstanding achievement anyway.

naiwen
06-25-2004, 02:35 PM
55 is the number he played single at slams.

He played double at US Open 1990, so this is his 57 consecutive appearances, isn't it?

Neely
06-25-2004, 02:55 PM
yes, that's right, I've just looked it up and the ATP site says he played doubles at the US Open 1990, so if you count doubles he even appeared in 57 consecutive Grand Slams ;)

CarnivalCarnage
06-25-2004, 03:44 PM
A bit more of motivation would not hurt Wayne. He was one of the most talented players of the generation. Probably on par with Kafelnikov or Rafter. And he goes away as huge underachievthis record is er. But outstanding achievement anyway.

Did you have a stroke on the second to last sentence?