Roland-Garros , french open [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Roland-Garros , french open

Gaga
05-16-2004, 05:14 PM
The next tournament of lleyton is well Roland-Garros cavity, l'open of France, the greatest tournament of the world on ground .He start May24th.Les tables soon will be known. Or think that Lleyton can go? Me I think 1/8 or 1/4 of finales if has a good table! I wait your reponses!

PS: Thank you has all those which put m'ont points of reputation Ca gives pleasure!

Lisbeth
05-17-2004, 10:17 AM
I'm also waiting nervously for the draw but I agree he can do better than the 3rd round like last year!

Good luck Lleyton!

Goonergal
05-17-2004, 05:16 PM
If I'm honest, I think that Lley may get to the 4th round at best. Perhaps QF if he gets a good draw. But, I'll stick with 4th round.

Good Luck Lley :D

Jess
05-17-2004, 10:10 PM
I kind of reluctantly agree :rolleyes: When his heads in gear he plays really well, but now and again he has these lapses and :shrug: he's not exactly consistent is he....

Of course I'd love him to win though ;) but I reckon 4th rnd at best.

Danni
05-18-2004, 09:37 AM
loving the positive attitudes...:p
:dance: GO LLEYTS!! :dance:

ally_014
05-18-2004, 09:43 AM
I'm not even gonna think about it cos I think with Lleyts you simply cannot predict what he'll do, and if you expect something he'll definitely do everything in his power to surprise and shock you! :p Just hope for the best and good luck to him :)

Jess
05-21-2004, 01:09 PM
The draw is out. He's playing Di Pasquale in the first round.
Wayne Ferreria or Jurgen Melzer in the second round....

Schuettler is likely for fourth round then it would probably be Ferrero if he gets that far. He's in the top half with Federer although wouldn't meet him until the semis. I think it could be worse.... :shrug:

Gaga
05-21-2004, 04:44 PM
He is 12 seed !

Gaga
05-21-2004, 04:51 PM
1ER QUART
Roger Federer (SUI/N.1) - Qualifié
Thierry Ascione (FRA) - Nicolas Kiefer (ALL)
Ruben Ramirez Hidalgo (ESP) - Gilles Elseneer (BEL)
Qualifié - Gustavo Kuerten (BRE/N.28)
Feliciano Lopez (ESP/N.23) - Nicolas Lapentti (EQU)
Ivo Karlovic (CRO) - Karol Kucera (SVQ)
Olivier Patience (FRA) - Filippo Volandri (ITA)
Robin Soderling (SUE) - Sjeng Schalken (PBS/N.15)
Sébastien Grosjean (FRA/N.10) - Qualifié
Qualifié - Dmitry Tursunov (RUS)
Felix Mantilla (ESP) - Qualifié
Agustin Calleri (ARG) - Marat Safin (RUS/N.20)
Ivan Ljubicic (CRO/N.25) - Hicham Arazi (MAR)
Stefan Kubek (AUT) - David Sanchez (ESP)
Kristian Pless (DAN) - Qualifié
Richard Gasquet (FRA) - David Nalbandian (ARG/N.8)
2E QUART
Juan Carlos Ferrero (ESP/N.4) - Tommy Haas (ALL)
Jan Vacek (TCH) - Igor Andreev (RUS)
Olivier Rochus (BEL) - David Ferrer (ESP)
Julien Benneteau (FRA) - Max Mirnyi (BLR/N.29)
Jonas Bjorkman (SUE/N.24) - Taylor Dent (USA)
Kenneth Carlsen (DAN) - Thomas Enqvist (SUE)
Guillermo Canas (ARG) - Gaston Gaudio (ARG)
Antony Dupuis (FRA) - Jiri Novak (TCH/N.14)
Leyton Hewitt (AUS/N.12) - Arnaud Di Pasquale (FRA)
Jurgen Melzer (AUT) - Wayne Ferreira (AFS)
Victor Hanescu (ROU) - Jean-René Lisnard (FRA)
Julien Boutter (FRA) - Martin Verkerk (PBS/N.19)
Albert Costa (ESP/N.26) - Flavio Saretta (BRE)
Christophe Rochus (BEL) - Qualifié
Qualifié - Qualifié
Xavier Malisse (BEL) - Rainer Schuettler (ALL/N.7)
3EME QUART
Carlos Moya (ESP/N.5) - John Van Lottum (PBS)
Fernando Vicente (ESP) - Qualifié
Raemon Sluiter (PBS) - Qualifié
Bohdan Ulihrach (TCH) - Dominik Hrbaty (SVQ/N.31)
Tommy Robredo (ESP/N.17) - Alberto Martin (ESP)
Qualifié - Todd Reid (AUS)
Radek Stepanek (TCH) - Qualifié
Qualifié - Nicolas Massu (CHI/N.11)
Fernando Gonzalez (CHI/N.16) - Qualifié
Wayne Arthurs (AUS) - Nicolas Escudé (FRA)
Mikhail Youzhny (RUS) - Dennis Van Scheppingen (PBS)
Oscar Hernandez (ESP) - Andreï Pavel (ROU/N.21)
Mariano Zabaleta (ARG/N.30) - Stéphane Robert (FRA)
Sargis Sargsian (ARM) - Mario Ancic (CRO)
Grégory Carraz (FRA) - Alex Bogomolov (USA)
Nicolay Davydenko (RUS) - Guillermo Coria (ARG/N.3)
4E QUART
Andre Agassi (USA/N.6) - Qualifié
Mickaël Llodra (FRA) - Alexander Popp (ALL)
Qualifié - Karol Beck (SVQ)
Qualifié - Vincent Spadea (USA/N.27)
Mark Philippoussis (AUS/N.18) - Luis Horna (PER)
Galo Blanco (ESP) - Albert Portas (ESP)
Lars Burgsmuller (ALL) - Nicolas Mahut (FRA)
Cyril Saulnier (FRA) - Tim Henman (GBR/N.9)
Paradorn Srichaphan (THA/N.13) - Tomas Berdych (TCH)
Alex Corretja (ESP) - Jan Michael Gambill (USA)
Greg Rusedski (GBR) - Fernando Verdasco (ESP)
Harel Levy (ISR) - Juan Ignacio Chela (ARG/N.22)
Arnaud Clément (FRA/N.32) - Fabrice Santoro (FRA)
Irakli Labadze (GEO) - Joachim Johansson (SUE)
Robby Ginepri (USA) - Olivier Mutis (FRA)
Todd Martin (USA) - Andy Roddick (USA/N.2

SomL.
05-22-2004, 04:23 AM
Good luck Lleyton in French Open !!!!!!!!!!!!

Gaga
05-22-2004, 01:23 PM
I espere that it will make for us an open check of France, because it begins has to'ameliore' on hard-packed surface, it would be necessary that it is recompense! Lol

Jess
05-22-2004, 02:07 PM
Well he seems confident anyway:

Hewitt heads to France in best form of his life
Agencies
22may04

FORMER world No. 1 Lleyton Hewitt believes he is in the form of his life on clay heading into next week's French Open.

The Roland Garros stadium has never been a happy hunting ground for Hewitt but he has renewed confidence ahead of the second Grand Slam of the year.
"I think every year I'm getting better and better on clay," Hewitt said at the World Team Cup in Germany.

"I've already done better in the (clay) tournaments I've played in this year compared with last, but I still need to improve before France.

"I've had another year of playing the best players on clay. I always find it a test to play on clay, but I am learning and I think it is showing in how I play the game and how I feel on court."









Hewitt had a difficult 2003 despite winning two ATP Tour events. He failed to progress past the quarter-final of any Grand Slam, was beaten in the first round at Wimbledon as defending champion and slipped down the rankings, losing his place as Australian No. 1 to Mark Philippoussis.

Having put 2003 down to experience, the 23-year-old Hewitt has already won two titles this year, although the wins in Sydney and Rotterdam were countered by the disappointment of a fourth-round exit at the Australian Open in January.

Despite his up-and-down form, Hewitt is sixth in the 2004 ATP Race and demonstrated his mettle on clay at the recent Hamburg Masters, where only a top-class performance from world No. 1 Roger Federer stopped him progressing to the final.

Perhaps more important is the fact that Hewitt appears to have rediscovered the self-confidence and enjoyment of the game that drove him to the top of the world rankings in 2001 aged just 20.

"I didn't win too many tournaments last year but I don't let that worry me because I am more comfortable this year so far," Hewitt said.

"I don't feel I am playing or doing anything different this year to last -- there's not a huge difference other than that I've had another year of experience."

Gaga
05-22-2004, 02:16 PM
Thanks boobette !

Billabong
05-23-2004, 03:21 PM
GO LLEYTON:D!!!

kim-fan
05-23-2004, 03:26 PM
he has to play on tuesday, he's not in the oop for monday >>>

CHATRIER 11:00
J.Henin-Hardenne (BEL)[1] vs. S.Testud(FRA)
A.Agassi (USA)[6] vs. J.Haehnel(FRA)
V.Pichet (FRA) vs. L.Davenport(USA)[5]
T.Martin (USA) vs. A.Roddick(USA)[2]

LENGLEN 11:00
C.Saulnier (FRA) vs. T.Henman(GBR)[9]
A.Mauresmo (FRA)[3] vs. L.Cervanova(SVK)
A.Clement (FRA)[32] vs. F.Santoro(FRA)
K.Koukalova (CZE) vs. T.Golovin(FRA)

Court 1 11:00
C.Castano (COL) vs. N.Petrova(RUS)[8]
N.Davydenko (RUS) vs. G.Coria(ARG)[3]
S.Kleinova (CZE) vs. E.Loit(FRA)[31]
W.Arthurs (AUS) vs. N.Escude(FRA)

Court 2 11:00
C.Moya (ESP)[5] vs. J.Van Lottum(NED)
M.Serna (ESP) vs. A.Morigami(JPN)
M.Llodra (FRA) vs. A.Popp(GER)
E.Daniilidou (GRE)[27] vs. M.Weingartner(GER)

Court 3 11:00
P.Srichaphan (THA)[13] vs. T.Berdych(CZE)
M.Maleeva (BUL)[21] vs. A.Barna(GER)
R.Ginepri (USA) vs. O.Mutis(FRA)
E.Dementieva (RUS)[9] vs. M.Jugic-Salkic(BIH)

Court 4 11:00
S.Obata (JPN) vs. V.Douchevina(RUS)
F.Vicente (ESP) vs. M.Gicquel(FRA)
N.Pratt (AUS) vs. T.Pisnik(SLO)
B.Ulihrach (CZE) vs. D.Hrbaty(SVK)[31]

Court 5 11:00
H.Levy (ISR) vs. J.Chela(ARG)[22]
J.Jeanpierre (FRA) vs. K.Beck(SVK)
J.Dokic (SCG)[24] vs. T.Perebiynis(UKR)
F.Pennetta (ITA) vs. A.Smashnova-Pistolesi(ISR)[19]

Court 6 11:00
B.Schwartz (AUT) vs. M.Sharapova(RUS)[18]
J.Jankovic (SCG) vs. S.Farina Elia(ITA)[15]
F.Gonzalez (CHI)[16] vs. F.Mayer(GER)
T.Robredo (ESP)[17] vs. A.Martin(ESP)

Court 7 11:00
D.Safina (RUS)[32] vs. J.Schruff(GER)
L.Burgsmuller (GER) vs. N.Mahut(FRA)
V.Zvonareva (RUS)[10] vs. Z.Kucova(SVK)
M.Philippoussis (AUS)[18] vs. L.Horna(PER)

Court 8 11:00
J.Monaco (ARG) vs. A.Bogomolov Jr.(USA)
S.Reeves (USA) vs. M.Shaughnessy(USA)
S.Sargsian (ARM) vs. M.Ancic(CRO)
A.Frazier (USA) vs. M.Camerin(ITA)

Court 9 11:00
T.Snyder (USA) vs. M.Irvin(USA)
M.Youzhny (RUS) vs. D.Van Scheppingen(NED)
D.Randriantefy (MAD) vs. J.Zheng(CHN)
R.Stepanek (CZE) vs. V.Voltchkov(BLR)

Court 10 11:00
I.Labadze (GEO) vs. J.Johansson(SWE)
J.Craybas (USA) vs. A.Medina Garrigues(ESP)
A.Harkleroad (USA) vs. M.Diaz-Oliva(ARG)
G.Garcia-Lopez (ESP) vs. T.Reid(AUS)

Court 11 11:00
Y.Fedak (UKR) vs. M.Santangelo(ITA)
J.Vakulenko (UKR) vs. A.Parra Santonja(ESP)
G.Blanco (ESP) vs. A.Portas(ESP)
R.Sluiter (NED) vs. R.Mello(BRA)

Court 14 11:00
T.Garbin (ITA) vs. C.Martinez Granados(ESP)
G.Rusedski (GBR) vs. F.Verdasco(ESP)
O.Hernandez (ESP) vs. A.Pavel(ROM)[21]
M.Sanchez Lorenzo (ESP) vs. S.Mamic(CRO)

Court 16 11:00
F.Serra (FRA) vs. V.Spadea(USA)[27]
R.Grande (ITA) vs. H.Nagyova(SVK)
C.Wheeler (AUS) vs. M.Marrero(ESP)
J.Tipsarevic (SCG) vs. N.Massu(CHI)[11]

Court 17 11:00
M.Sequera (VEN) vs. P.Suarez(ARG)[14]
A.Corretja (ESP) vs. J.Gambill(USA)
L.Kurhajcova (SVK) vs. L.Raymond(USA)[28]
M.Zabaleta (ARG)[30] vs. S.Robert(FRA)

Socket
05-23-2004, 04:41 PM
Good, he gets another day of rest. Good luck, Lleyton, I'll be cheering for you!

NOMAD
05-23-2004, 06:04 PM
Luck of French draw favours Hewitt
By Linda Pearce
Paris
May 24, 2004

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The key to Lleyton Hewitt's prospects late in the French Open are likely to be found much closer to the start. The effects of long days on clay are cumulative and Hewitt's draw should help him avoid too many draining, drawn-out duels in the early rounds and conserve his strength for what may lie ahead.

The Australian's failure to pass the quarter-final stage at Roland Garros is not so much a reflection of his ability to beat the world's best on the slow terre battue as the difficulties that come with doing so day after day. His South American and European tormenters queue up with their high-bouncing topspin and heavy baseline play. Beat one and it seems another is waiting. And then one more.

The fact that Hewitt acknowledges clay is not his best surface is seen by some as another factor in a mental battle he may, in some respects, be waging with himself. "In his own mind, he regards the French as the hardest," says Tennis Australia's head of men's tennis, Peter Johnston, "so that makes it hard."

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Still, Hewitt also insists it is not necessarily true that his expectations are lower on clay. All it takes is more time to adjust, and to feel comfortable, he says, for his season is shorter than many. Hence, the value of the match play gained in Germany over the past two weeks because although Hewitt grew up on hardcourts and has adapted well enough to grass to own a Wimbledon title, dirt remains to be conquered.

"Purely because I haven't grown up sliding and in that frame of mind," Hewitt said during his recent semi-final run at the Hamburg Masters. "So maybe it takes me . . . a few more matches than a lot of the other guys. But I still think the results that I've had, I can match it with the best guys in the world. I feel confident about it.

"I think day-in and day-out, I am a better player on clay than I was (two or three years ago). I was able to produce a big match now and then on clay. Now moving-wise, tactic-wise, I worked out a lot of things. And just from playing against the best claycourt players in the world, I will get better and better on clay just from the experience."

What generally has been noted is Hewitt's willingness to play more aggressively and he believes the extra couple of kilograms - a result of the beefed-up gym and fitness work undertaken at the behest of Roger Rasheed, his coach of almost one year - has helped in that respect. And the assistance is perhaps more valuable on clay, where the best players are able to hit through the court's slowness.

This year, Hewitt's draw should at least give him some time to settle in, for he is drawn to play French wildcard Arnaud Di Pasquale - who has not won a tour-level match for 14 months - in the first round tomorrow, then possibly Jurgen Melzer, followed by struggling 2003 finalist Martin Verkerk and seventh seed Rainer Schuettler.

"For Lleyton to win it, he needs to probably finish some of his matches off a little quicker, especially in the early rounds and in the middle . . . of the tournament, where he lets his body recover," says Davis Cup captain John Fitzgerald. "So it's the toughest one for him to win, but I wouldn't say he can't win it.

"I've said that I think he has the potential this year to be a better player than he's ever been. I think he's stronger and more physical and that probably needs to keep continuing a bit, which it is. Lleyton can hit the ball a little bit harder now, which he has to do, especially on the clay and on the slower courts."

Johnston, too, stresses the need to close out points when an opportunity comes. "On an individual day on the clay, I don't think there's anyone he can't beat, but it's the cumulative wearing-down," he said.

"That's where I think aggression is important, to be able to end some points quicker, to be there at the end, because I think Lleyton still has got, and the other players know this, that ability to get his opponents thinking that, 'Gee, if he's there and ready for me today, I'm going to have the battle of my life on my hands here.' "

Indeed, three-time French champion Mats Wilander has bracketed Hewitt with Carlos Moya, Roger Federer, Guillermo Coria and David Nalbandian as one of five main title contenders, despite Hewitt's slide from the top 10, his modest claycourt results and the fact he has not reached a major semi-final since Wimbledon in 2002.

Both Hewitt and Mark Philippoussis appeal as stronger candidates on grass, encouraging results in last week's World Team Cup exhibition in Dusseldorf notwithstanding. For Philippoussis, in fact, the experience may even have been career-reviving, for his three wins were his first since his decline began against Hicham Arazi in the fourth round of the Australian Open.

The 18th seed must open against Peruvian baseliner Luis Horna today, but at least now has cause to hope that the worst is over. "Sometimes, you just need one match to get back into your old game," Philippoussis said after saving two match points against Mariano Zabaleta in Dusseldorf. "Hopefully, that was the case for me today."

NOMAD
05-23-2004, 06:09 PM
Thanks for posting the order of play :kiss:

Spaniards line up clay pigeons
By Bruce Wilson in Paris
May 24, 2004

AS a tournament, it can suffer in the outside world from what might be called SSWWI syndrome - Some Spaniard Will Win It.

The French Open carries that kind of label with it in the men's tournament - though not the women's, where the red clay and the three-set format opens the field much more, not least through undermining the patience of The Sisters, Venus and Serena.

We may be tired of hearing that the French means more to European players than any other grand slam title. That may be because no Australian has won since Rod Laver in 1969 and it would be a miracle approaching beautification if an Australian won this year.

Lleyton Hewitt actually has a pretty good record here, one quarter-final, twice in the fourth round. You would think he has both the game and the patience; you just wonder what might have happened to that thing he always had most of, the edge.

Last year he admitted he had no idea how to win the Roland Garros title after losing in the third round to Tommy Robredo and this time he admits he's well short of being a serious contender.

"I feel like I'm playing well, but if I'm going to go all the way I'll have to improve," he said last week in Dusseldorf.

"There's probably four, five guys that are the real favourites," said Hewitt, who plays French wildcard and world No.423 Arnaud di Pasquale in the first round.

"I guess that's Federer, Coria, Ferrero and Moya."

The French though is a major and some great tennis players win it simply because they are great. Andre Agassi, who won in 1999 for the first and only time and who is seeded six this year, fits that bill. The Russian Marat Safin, seeded 20, might be on the verge.

And so might Lleyton Hewitt, seeded at 12.

Mark Philipoussis, too, has just had a couple of very gutsy wins but then a loss in the made-up Nations Cup in Dusseldorf, and his form is all over the place.

It would seem they can be put on one side, for future reference comes Wimbledon a month from now. That is not such a bad thing, since it helps to take parochialism out of the French and to see it for what it is.

The French Open is not dashing at all but it is certainly the most chic of all the majors, but whoever wins the men's title will have played many more hundreds of shots than he who wins Wimbledon. Dashing it ain't.

Nobody much doubts that the best player in the world now is Roger Federer of Switzerland, and there are those looking at his good recent form on clay who say he is on for the grand slam this year.

But he has a pig of a draw, looking at a probable third-round match against three-time winner here (1997, 2000-01), Brazilian Gustavo Kuerten.

He also has David Nalbandian, the persistent Argentine, Safin and Sebastien Grosjean, with a home-town advantage, in his draw before the semis. It is a huge ask, but he is a huge player.

Agassi will think himself in the easier half of the draw, with a quarter-final against Carlos Moya in the seedings. But he has just turned 34 and we saw in the Australian that to avoid long rallies he has been hitting the ball as early as he can.

Hewitt, if all went according to plan, would meet Federer in a semi, needing to beat at least one previous winner here on the way.

The Daily Telegraph

Gaga
05-23-2004, 08:21 PM
thanks and good luck Lleyton !!!! COME ON !!

Raquel
05-23-2004, 11:11 PM
Good Luck Lleyton! :bounce:

kim4eva
05-24-2004, 09:39 AM
GO Lleyton :clap2: :bounce:

NOMAD
05-24-2004, 09:55 AM
Hewitt set for tough French Open
May 24, 2004 - 4:05PM

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Lleyton Hewitt begins what he hopes will be a long, hard fortnight at Roland Garros with what should be a nice, easy first round on Monday.

Hewitt's French Open campaign gets underway against local wildcard Arnaud Di Pasquale, ranked 423 and, on paper, no match for the 12th seed and former world No.1.

Shoulder injuries have wrecked the Frenchman's career which peaked at a world ranking of 39 in 2000 and tournament officials gave him a wildcard for his first grand slam since last year's Australian Open 16 months ago.

Hewitt, 23, beat Di Pasquale in their previous two encounters which were both on clay in 2000 and 2001 but the South Australian knows he won't be as poor as the rankings suggest.

But he still welcomed a start against a rusty opponent as he braced for a gruelling time on the clay at Roland Garros where he hasn't progressed further than the quarter-finals in five attempts.

"He's obviously going to be pumped up in his own country," Hewitt said.

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"He's a very talented player like most of the French players. He's a shot-maker.

"You just have to find a way of getting through the first week. Physically, it's so grinding to play seven best-of-five-set matches on clay.

"Even if you are not playing that well to win it, you just have to hang in the tournament."

Despite the inevitable leg weariness on clay, Hewitt was looking forward to a return to the draining five-set matches after a solid few weeks of three-setters on clay.

He reached the semi-finals at the Hamburg Masters where he lost to French Open top seed Roger Federer and came from a set down twice last week to beat Robby Ginepri and Martin Verkerk in the World Teams Cup in Dusseldorf.

But he was realistic about his chances on his least-favoured surface and was setting his sights modestly on winning a few rounds, rather than lifting the Coupe de Mousquetaires on June 6.

"It was a great week (in Dusseldorf), I had three tough matches," Hewitt said.

"I feel good about where my game is at. I'd like to have had a better start in two of the matches but in five sets you can work your way into the match a little bit better than over three sets.

"I feel confident. I played in patches my best tennis over the last days. I think I've played well.

© 2004 AAP

Lisbeth
05-24-2004, 10:29 AM
Thanks Nomad!

I think it's a good sign that Ll thinks 5 sets is good - he must be feeling fit and fresh again!

NOMAD
05-24-2004, 12:19 PM
Wilander's five men to watch


Wilander won seven Grand Slam singles titles in his career
Mats Wilander won the first of his three French Open titles in 1982 when he was just 17 years old. These days he's the Swedish Davis Cup captain and a regular on the Delta Tour of Champions.
Here he gives BBC Sport his five men to watch at this year's French Open:



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


CARLOS MOYA
Strengths: He's one of the few guys that has an aggressive clay-court game and I think he can beat a Juan Carlos Ferrero or Guillermo Coria when they're playing well. He can run them around and he's got a huge forehand.
Weaknesses: If the other guys play tough enough and are able to get to his backhand. Somebody who hits the ball hard is able to do that but most guys are not able to hit through Moya, so he always has time to run around to his forehand.


ROGER FEDERER
Strengths: He's really a clay-court player, even though he plays his best tennis on faster surfaces. His shots are really clay-court shots, with a lot of topspin, and he moves unbelievably well. If he gets on a roll it's possible we can see the same thing happen as at the Australian Open or Wimbledon last year.
Weaknesses: It's tough for him to put seven matches together. He can do that on a faster court because some days he is going to serve a little better but on clay it's really hard because you've got to find a high level and keep that for seven matches. I'm not sure he can do that on clay yet but I'd love to see it.


DAVID NALBANDIAN

Nalbandian has already reached the Wimbledon and US Open finals
Strengths: He knows he can beat the Roger Federers or Andy Roddicks and it doesn't matter what surface it's on. He can stay there for ever and, I think, play seven good matches, which is what you need in a Grand Slam.
Weaknesses: His weakness might be that if Moya, Ferrero or Federer plays well he'll have problems hurting them. But if they are just a little bit off their game then I would say Nalbandian is the favourite.


JUAN CARLOS FERRERO
Strengths: He's been away for a while but he knows that if he comes in with one or two matches in his pocket, he's ready. When he gets to the French Open he knows he can do it and the other guys know if he plays well, he's probably going to be the guy to beat for the next 10 years.
Weaknesses: His weakness is the illness and he's still a little bit of an up-and-down player. When he plays well, he plays really well, and he makes too many unforced errors when he plays badly. If the French Open wasn't coming up I wouldn't mention his name, but you've got to watch out for him.


LLEYTON HEWITT
Strengths: It's a bit of an emotional pick but I think Lleyton was a little misunderstood at the beginning of his career. He's had his problems with the media but he really is a great guy on court. I just love the way he fights, the way he competes. :clap2:
Weaknesses: His strength is the way he can construct a point, his weakness is that he doesn't do it often enough. The French Open is rough for him but if it gets heavy and the courts are really slow, and he's physically up for the task, he's my dark horse.

Verdict: If Moya plays well he's my favourite.

NOMAD
05-24-2004, 04:35 PM
Court 1 11:00 Start
1. Women's Singles - 1st Rnd.
Marion Bartoli (FRA) v. Ai Sugiyama (JPN)[12]
followed by:
2. Men's Singles - 1st Rnd.
Xavier Malisse (BEL) v. Rainer Schuettler (GER)[7]
3. Women's Singles - 1st Rnd.
Gisela Dulko (ARG) v. Martina Navratilova (USA)
4. Men's Singles - 1st Rnd.
Lleyton Hewitt (AUS)[12] v. Arnaud Di Pasquale (FRA)

Gaga
05-24-2004, 05:30 PM
thanks for the articles and info !

kit
05-24-2004, 08:31 PM
Good Luck and come on Lleyton!!!! :worship: :worship:

Lisbeth
05-25-2004, 02:12 AM
Good luck Lleyton. Anyone in a time zone where his match won't be played in the middle of the night, please say an extra "C'MON" for me, please!

ally_014
05-25-2004, 07:30 AM
Thanks for all the articles and info and COME ON LLEYTON!

(plus ditto what Jane said :p)

Gaga
05-25-2004, 08:08 AM
GOOD LUCK LLEYTON !!!!!!!!!!!!! COME ON !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!C'MON ROCKY !!!!!!!!!!!!:nerner:

SomL.
05-25-2004, 10:24 AM
Good luck Lleyton in first round !!!!!!!!! Come on Lleyton !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

kim-fan
05-25-2004, 07:25 PM
Match Summary

Hewitt (AUS)

1st Serve % 68 of 128 = 53 %

Aces 6

Double Faults 6

Unforced Errors 44

Winning % on 1st Serve 46 of 68 = 68 %

Winning % on 2nd Serve 27 of 60 = 45 %

Winners (Including Service) 37

Receiving Points Won 60 of 111 = 54 %

Break Point Conversions 10 of 18 = 56 %

Net Approaches 15 of 27 = 56 % 15

Total Points Won 133

Fastest Serve 195 km/h

Average 1st Serve Speed 163 km/h

Average 2nd Serve Speed 132 km/h

--------------------------------------
Di Pasquale (FRA)

1st Serve % 68 %

Aces 0

Double Faults 4

Unforced Errors 65

Winning % on 1st Serve 35 of 76 = 46 %

Winning % on 2nd Serve 16 of 35 = 46 %

Winners (Including Service) 30

Receiving Points Won 55 of 128 = 43 %

Break Point Conversions 6 of 16 = 38 %

Net Approaches 15 of 28 = 54 %

Total Points Won 106

Fastest Serve 185 km/h

Average 1st Serve Speed 145 km/h

Average 2nd Serve Speed 129 km/h

Bibi
05-25-2004, 08:53 PM
An article from the RG page:

There's something about Lleyton...
By Nyree Epplett
Tuesday, May 25, 2004

You’ve got to admit it. There’s something about Lleyton Hewitt that French tennis fans just don’t like.

Is it is his brash arrogance, or those ‘in-your-face’ cries of “C’mon”?

Perhaps it’s his propensity for on-court gesticulation and self-combustion.

And then there’s the persistent questioning of line calls…

On Court One late Monday it was probably a combination of all of the above.

Oh, and the fact he was playing a Frenchman…

And so it was, amidst whistles and boos and rhythmic clapping from the partisan crowd, Hewitt valiantly carried the hopes of a nation into the second round. The former world No1 beat the cramping journeyman Arnaud di Pasquale in four long sets 6-0 7-6(5) 4-6 6-0.

And with the gutsy triumph came the heavy weight of expectation. He is the only Australian man left standing after the likes of Philippoussis, Arthurs and Reid tripped up on the red dirt on day one.

Against the French wildcard a composed Hewitt hung tough behind the baseline, whipping up a lethal cocktail of inside-out forehands and screaming double-handed backhands from all angles.

He slammed six aces and 37 winners during the grueling three hour, six minute contest but struggled with an inconsistent service game. And when his back was to the wall, he recovered fearlessly to break the spirit of di Pasquale and race through the fourth set in 32 minutes.

“I didn’t feel too bad. I still feel like I’m getting better and better on it (clay),” said Hewitt, adding that he hoped his generous dose of claycourt tennis in the lead-in to this event would pay off. The Australian played Monte Carlo, Rome, Hamburg (where he reached the semi finals) and last week he led Australia to the World Team Cup final in Düsseldorf.

Although the Frenchman suffered severe cramping in his left leg throughout the final set, unable to sit down at the change of ends, Hewitt remained focused until the end.

“It’s always difficult playing your first match in a Grand Slam event, wherever it is...He had nothing to lose but I’ve got a lot of respect for him too. Any French player is going to be extremely tough in their home Grand Slam.

“I’ll give 100 percent like I always do and see what happens,” said the Aussie, who meets Austrian Jurgen Melzer next, who he beat in Hamburg in straight sets.

“I’ve gotta be prepared to play a long match,” said the 12th seed.



!!!Well done Lleyton, good luck in the next round!!!

FanOfHewitt
05-25-2004, 09:13 PM
The crowd might have hated Hewitt but I thought it was great sportsmanship by Lleyton to give Arnaud some time to recover from his cramp during Lleyton's service game. Lleyton waited for around a minute between points whilst Arnaud composed himself and stretched out. Arnaud paid back the favour by smashing a forehand winner on the next point. lmfaooo!

Raquel
05-26-2004, 12:17 AM
Well done Lleyton :worship:

One match at a time :)

Good Luck Thursday :bounce:

Lisbeth
05-26-2004, 12:53 AM
Sure he could have improved some things, but a win is a win is a win! Good luck for the second round Lleyton!

It always makes me laugh that crowds still think they can put Lleyton off by booing him. You'd think after various episodes in New York and other venues they'd realise he positively thrives on it!

ally_014
05-26-2004, 05:55 AM
Good luck against Melzer Lleyton!

I don't know what they hope to achieve by booing him - it might just make them feel better!?!

Gaga
05-26-2004, 08:34 AM
I saw the match on Eurosport and very well played Lleyton !! That is obvious that it(he) is to improve on hard-packed surface!!! Good luck for your next match, one is all with you and COME ONE!!!:notworthy:

jule
05-26-2004, 10:32 AM
i wasn't able to watch it because eurosport has shown capriati vs. beyge...something :fiery: and i thought that i would be able to watch lleytons match when capriati was 6-3 3-0 in front and then the ukrain broke back i was so angry :o :fiery:

SomL.
05-26-2004, 10:48 AM
Good luck Lleyton in second round !!!!!!!!!!!

Gaga
05-26-2004, 10:51 AM
No luck(chance), me I saw the match in its entirety, it just showed the others French from time to time!!! I am sure I shall have ete in Australia, I shall have aps been able to see him then I me full step, I was lucky to be in France this week!!

kim4eva
05-26-2004, 01:35 PM
Great match Lleyton! It was a pretty good match. :yeah:
Good luck tommorow :bounce:

Gaga
05-26-2004, 08:35 PM
Good luck for tomorrow against Melzer !

Gaga
05-26-2004, 08:37 PM
LENGLEN Début à 11:00
1. Simple Messieurs - 2e Tour
Lleyton Hewitt (AUS)[12] v. Jurgen Melzer (AUT)
suivi:
2. Simple Dames - 2e Tour
Mary Pierce (FRA)[30] v. Gala Leon Garcia (ESP)
3. Simple Messieurs - 2e Tour
Sebastien Grosjean (FRA)[10] v. Potito Starace (ITA)
4. Simple Dames - 2e Tour
Maria Kirilenko (RUS) v. Serena Williams (USA)[2]

Gaga
05-26-2004, 08:39 PM
Kim is in paris , she was supported him !!

Goonergal
05-27-2004, 01:00 AM
i wasn't able to watch it because eurosport has shown capriati vs. beyge...something :fiery: and i thought that i would be able to watch lleytons match when capriati was 6-3 3-0 in front and then the ukrain broke back i was so angry :o :fiery:

LOL :D

Yeah, I was stuck with Jen's match too.

Anyway, GOOD LUCK LLEYTON :dance:

Lisbeth
05-27-2004, 04:07 AM
Yay for Kim in Paris! Good luck Lleyton!

I never knew singles was "simple" in French - that has some quite cool potential for cross-linguistic jokes, particularly "simple dames" :devil:

Gaga
05-27-2004, 07:29 AM
Good luck Lleyton !!!I put my magnetoscope has you enregsitrer to see you, because I go current!!!!!! Please, go! One is all with you! And in more has Kim there!:sarcastic:

kim4eva
05-27-2004, 01:12 PM
Yay! Good job Lleyton! He won the match 6-4, 6-4, 4-6, 6-2 :worship:
And Kim was there too! :angel:

star
05-27-2004, 01:51 PM
Yay for Kim in Paris! Good luck Lleyton!

I never knew singles was "simple" in French - that has some quite cool potential for cross-linguistic jokes, particularly "simple dames" :devil:

:lol:

Funny!!


:yippee: Lleyton!!! Well done! :yippee:

I'm glad people got to see Kim in the stands. I didn't get ANY of this match. :(

NOMAD
05-27-2004, 02:50 PM
Hewitt overpowers Austrian
From correspondents in Paris
May 27, 2004

LLEYTON HEWITT lifted a gear when needed to scramble his way into the third round of the French Open with a four sets win over Austrian world No.51 Jurgen Melzer.

Hewitt blew a chance to wrap up a straight sets win when he handed back a break in the third set and grew increasingly frustrated with himself as he ground out a 6-4 6-4 4-6 6-2 win in two hours and 44 minutes.

The 12th seeded Australian appeared to lack a killer punch, giving up early breaks in each of the first three sets as he struggled to assert his service on the red clay.

But he turned up the tempo when under pressure in the fourth set, breaking Melzer's serve twice and convincingly holding on to his own to secure a place in the third round.

Hewitt came back from a break down in the first set to win four games in a row and exchanged breaks with the left hander in the second before a pair of double faults from Melzer gave the former world No.1 the decisive break.

In the third set, Hewitt appeared to be heading for his second straight sets win over Melzer this month when he broke him to lead 4-3 and stepped up to serve to go to a 5-3 lead.

But he did not win a point on his serve and after Melzer held his to lead 5-4, the pony-tailed Austrian broke Hewitt for the second successive game to take the match into a fourth set.

The only Australian left in the tournament, Hewitt came into Roland Garros on the back of the best clay court build up of his career, winning nine of 14 matches on the red dirt before arriving in Paris. Games went smoothly with serve in the first set on a crisp Paris morning until Hewitt stumbled on his to go down 4-2 as Melzer's deep penetrating forehands gave him the ascendancy.

Hewitt struck back immediately, with a forehand pass giving him two break points.

Hewitt had to battle to hold his serve in the next game, saving a break point and then restoring the balance at 4-4 with a sliced backhand and an ace.

He set himself up for the decisive break with a sizzling backhand winner down the line and broke the left hander for the second time.

Serving for the set, a service winner and an ace took Hewitt to 30-0, but Melzer's pace kept him in the game and he scrambled his way around the court retrieving drop shots and angled volleys to hold two break points.

For once, Hewitt's serve got him out of trouble and his third ace gave him set point and another service winner gave him the set in 41 minutes.

Hewitt was pleased with the way he overcame the skilful Melzer, whom he beat in the quarter-finals at the Hamburg Masters earlier this month.

"I felt like I played well, I felt like I played better than I did in my first round," Hewitt said.

"He's an awkward player to play. He mixes it up, he mixes the pace up, he hits a lot of drop shots.

"It was very good to get that first set under my belt, it was good to come back from 4-2 down.

"I could have served definitely better out there, I probably didn't get as many first serves in as I would have liked.

"But I felt I mixed it up well.

"The break points that I was down throughout the first and second set I was able to get out of them. I felt like I served well on the big points."

He said his better clay preparation this year was producing results.

"I feel pretty confident where my game's at at the moment."

kim4eva
05-27-2004, 03:59 PM
Here's the interview of Lleyton after his match against Melzer...:D
You can also watch the video of it here: http://www.rolandgarros.com/en_FR/news/interviews/2004-05-27/200405271085668061540.html

Q. I guess you could have won that in three, but you also could have lost the first set. Pretty tight either way?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I felt like I played well. I felt like I played better than I did in my first round.

He's an awkward player to play. I played him in Hamburg for the first time. He mixes it up. He mixes the pace up. He hits a lot of dropshots. He's a left-hander, as well, so obviously the serve is a little bit different.

Very good to get that first set under my belt. Obviously beat him in straight sets in Hamburg, keep that momentum going from that first one. Good to come back from 4-2 down in the first set.

Q. Every time you broke him, he broke you almost straight back. Was that a concentration thing or something your serve is troubling you?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Well, it's pretty much only the once I think in the third set that he broke me straight back after I broke him in the second set, but I was able to break him again and hold it out.

No, I don't think -- you know, I could have served definitely better out there. Probably didn't get as many first serves in as I would have liked. But, you know, I felt like I mixed it up well. The breakpoints that I was down, you know, throughout the first and second set, I was able to get out of them. I felt like I served well on the big points.

Q. Are you feeling better for the fact you played more on clay leading in than you have in the past? Do you think it's made a difference to you to where you are right now?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I feel pretty confident where my game's at at the moment. This time last year actually, even though I lost to Robredo, I felt like the first two sets in that match were the best tennis I ever played on clay, when I won those first two sets.

I feel confident maybe overall more, maybe moving a little bit better on clay this year purely because I've spent a little bit more time on it.

But, yeah, every time I come to the clay court season, I think it's always going to take me a few weeks to get to my best.

Q. Just talk about the difference between the third and fourth sets, how you were able to turn that around, walk away pretty easily in the last set?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I didn't feel like there was a huge difference out there. I had breakpoints in the first game of the third, and the third game of the third set. I actually felt like I was really getting on top of him there. He came up with some big serves. I think he came up with a net cord on one of the breakpoints there. I actually felt like I was holding my service games a lot easier at the start of the third set.

You know, I went up a break in the third set. Didn't do that much wrong. He came up with a couple of big shots. You know, probably just didn't quite stay as aggressive as I could have at the 5-4 game when I lost my serve to lose a set. Then again, he came up with some big shots. He really had nothing to lose after being down two sets and a break.

I felt like it was important, any time I got those breakpoints early in the fourth set, to take them. I was able to do that early on and sort of roll on with it from there.

Q. How much is coming to the net helped you on clay? You had pretty good percentages, it's a grind on clay, play a lot of points from the back. But shortening points and closing things out during a tournament of this length, how big is that?>

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, it's obviously a good way to win points a little bit easier, instead of staying out there grinding. I still feel it's an area of my game I can still work on and get better at.

You know, it's a lot easier I think doing it in practice, you know, then when you got to get out there and do it in the match. Especially in Grand Slams, it's a little bit tougher to make yourself do it all the time.

But I feel overall, I'm doing a little bit better than I've done in the past.

Q. How do the Slams for you compare? Which one is the toughest? Clay is a different surface for you. You must have a lot of pressures on at the Australian, the US Open is always a tough grind. How would you rank them?>

LLEYTON HEWITT: You know, obviously the clay court, I think, being at the French Open, to win seven best-of-five-set matches on clay is probably one of the toughest for me personally. For a lot of other guys like Ferrero, it's a little bit easier than the other Slams. So everyone is different.

The other three, I'd say, are pretty similar. Wimbledon you can probably get, you know, some easier draws now and then. But a lot of the clay court specialists are a lot better than grass these days, playing from the back of the court, than they used to be. You know, so there's still some opportunities to get through I think some easier matches, you know, maybe at Wimbledon than you can here, depending on the draw. I think there's so many tough players. Every round is tough here, lucky losers coming through, qualifiers, whoever.

Q. Just the grind of seven clay court matches is the toughest than the distractions of New York or what you have in Australia?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, obviously playing your home Grand Slam, you know, there's always expectation. Yeah, you're on center court a lot more I guess every match. That's something -- after I've played it seven or eight times, you come to deal with that, though. I've played enough Davis Cup matches home, it doesn't really faze me too much.

Q. Hanescu was up a set and a break. Can you talk about the prospects of him in the next round, if it is him?>

LLEYTON HEWITT: If I play him, I played him once only, I think in the US Open first round, night match, last year. He's a tough players. I think he's probably better on clay than he is on hard court, as well. He's had a lot of good wins just before that time I think when I played him, and a lot more since then. He's got a nice backhand, very smooth from the back of the court for a big guy. Obviously, his weapon's his serve.

Q. If it is Verkerk?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I played Martin last week in Dusseldorf, had a very tough match with him. 7-5 in the third. Yeah, he likes playing at this place. Especially last year, I'm sure he's got good feelings about coming in here. I've played him in Sydney on hard court, and I think he's a lot better player on clay than he is on hard court.

Yeah, it will be a tough match. In some ways, they both play a little bit similar games. Obviously, they like dictating play from the back of the court with their big groundstrokes. But, yeah, they can come to the net, and obviously their serves, as well.

Q. A few weeks ago in Rome, there was a hotel fire, luxury hotel. Could have been much more disastrous. That hotel had no fire sprinkling system. When you go into a hotel on the road, is safety a factor for you? Will it be in the future?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Probably more so now. You don't really think about it too much. I'm sure you guys don't think about it too much either when you're traveling, as well, until something like that happens.

It's like the September 11th thing, you don't think about planes, traveling, security, until that happens sometimes. You know, sure, I've spoken to a couple of guys. They were awfully close to...

Who knows what could have happened. I think you think about it a lot more after something like that does happen.

Q. Coming back to the match of today, he's Austria's No. 1, a lot of expectations on him, as well. He seems to be talented. He had you sometimes with his strokes. What is your opinion on his game? How far can he go?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, he's a good player. He's a very good player. He mixes it up very well. He's got a different kind of game out there. He's probably a little bit loose still out there, you know, on some big points.

But, you know, he's had some good wins, especially this year. I know he beat Henman in the first round in Miami. He obviously beat Safin and some guys pretty easily on clay in Hamburg before I played him. I think he's just going to get better and better.

He looks like he can play on all surfaces, too.

Q. Have you been made aware of the details of the US Open series program, the six-tournament buildup in which you can double your winnings at the US Open? Are you familiar with that?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I don't know the whole details. I know enough, I think.

Q. The money involved, would that cause you to reassess how many tournaments you would play leading up to the US Open? How seductive is the money factor?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, for me personally, I wouldn't change my schedule. I'll do what I think's in the best interest of, you know, how I'm going to perform the best at the US Open for that fortnight. I'm not going to go out there and chase whatever tournaments it is.

So me personally, I won't be changing my schedule around the US Open series. But, you know, I think, who knows, if it's going to be a great success or not. I think the positive will be if we can get more television on -- tennis on television in the United States. From what I've heard, I think a lot more of the tournaments and finals especially are meant to be on TV live, which will be a lot better, I think.

Q. The first men's tournament on that series is LA. You've signed up for that tournament. What do you like about LA and California?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I don't know. The tournament, I've only played it -- the first time I played it, I actually made the quarters, twisted my ankle against Andre. I like the tournament. The night matches there are good fun, good atmosphere, good crowds there. Yeah, I just feel like it's a good place to start before the Super 9's, before the two Masters Series leading in. Played well there last year. I was unlucky not to win it.

Yeah, I like going back there. It's a smaller tournament, but it's a well-run tournament, as well.

Q. It seems you have the game to play on clay very successfully. What do you think is missing compared to your big successes on other surfaces so far?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I don't know. I think naturally, you know, especially hard court, I think my game, you know, naturally I grew up playing on hard court. Grass, I had to adjust my game a little bit, I think. But probably clay more so I've had to adjust my game. It's going to take time. It doesn't come as naturally, as easy, I think, as the other surfaces. Plus some of these other guys, you know, they wake up and they train on clay every day of their life.

Q. Given that Michael Chang won, your games aren't completely similar, but wasn't big, no huge weapon, there's no counting you out of winning a title like this, is there?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No, I don't think so. I think Michael was obviously an exceptional player. I think the game's changed a little bit. You know, obviously with probably the power and that a little bit more. I think Michael beat Lendl in the final. Yeah, Lendl hit the ball extremely hard, from what I've heard from a lot of guys.

Yeah, I don't think with my style of game I can totally be counted out. I think there's a lot more clay court specialists these days, though, that are probably the favorites to win here.

Gaga
05-27-2004, 04:55 PM
thanks for the interview and good job Lleyton !! good luck for the next match !

Jess
05-27-2004, 06:24 PM
A surprisingly detailed interview from Lleyts :)

Socket
05-27-2004, 06:45 PM
Lleyton is now the highest ranked player in his bracket, but he still has to play the 2003 finalist and then is scheduled to play the 2002 champion. . .

Goonergal
05-28-2004, 12:39 AM
WELL DONE LLEYTS!

Onto Verkerk (Again! ;))

Lisbeth
05-28-2004, 03:06 AM
Yeah that was positively chatty for LLeyton!

Hooray for making the 3rd round again and GOOD LUCK against Verkerk!

ally_014
05-28-2004, 06:01 AM
Well done Lleyton (for both the match and the interview!)

Good luck against Verkerk :)

kim4eva
05-28-2004, 09:13 AM
:worship: Lleyton!

Good luck next match :clap2:

SomL.
05-28-2004, 10:36 AM
Good luck Lleyton in third round !!!!!!!!!!!!!! Come on Lleyton ^_^

star
05-28-2004, 01:24 PM
Llayton sounds confident and ready to go. Gosh. These first rounds at Roland Garros are so tough! I feel like he's played more matches than he has already.

Gaga
05-28-2004, 04:22 PM
good luck lley !!!

kit
05-28-2004, 08:53 PM
Good luck Lleyts against Martin tomorrow!!! :worship: :worship: :worship:
You can do it!!! :)

Bibi
05-28-2004, 10:13 PM
Don't know if the schedule of play for Saterday already has been posted...

LENGLEN 11:00 Start
1. Women's Singles - 3rd Rnd.
Anastasia Myskina (RUS)[6] v. Denisa Chladkova (CZE)
followed by:
2. Women's Singles - 3rd Rnd.
Silvija Talaja (CRO) v. Serena Williams (USA)[2]
3. Men's Singles - 3rd Rnd.
Igor Andreev (RUS) v. Julien Benneteau (FRA)
4. Men's Singles - 3rd Rnd.
Lleyton Hewitt (AUS)[12] v. Martin Verkerk (NED)[19]

!!Good luck against Verkerk, Lleyton!!

NOMAD
05-29-2004, 01:03 AM
Cards appear to fall Hewitt's way

29may04

WHAT do we know about Martin Verkerk, the man who stands between solitary Aussie you-beaut kid Lleyton Hewitt and his appearance in the second week of the French Open?

Well, this much: It takes a long time for him to write his place of birth on those endless forms. It is Alphen aan den Rijn Pays Bas Nederland.
This kind of meaningless information disguises a player who might be a pushover or might be a pain in the reversed cap for Hewitt. Ranked 25 in the world, he is not far removed from the Australian.

They have played twice and Hewitt has won both. The first, in Sydney in January, ended with Verkerk retiring injured after losing the only set 6-2. Then, only a week or so ago in Dusseldorf, Hewitt won again.

But this time it was on clay and it went to three tough sets.

Verkerk, 196cm tall with a big right-handed serve, astonished the tennis world and, by all accounts, himself, by making the final here last year.

That is one of the strangest occurrences in tennis. Apart from getting there -- where he was thrashed by Juan Carlos Ferrero 6-1 6-3 6-2 -- Verkerk's grand slam record looks only slightly better than mine.

He has lost in the first round four times out of five, and in the second the only other.

But this is Paris and strange things happen. Ferrero, the fourth seed and defending champion, for example, lost yesterday in curious circumstances to the Russian with a name like an opera, Igor Andreev, ranked 77.

Ferrero had been saying he was not fit, citing a fall during practice. Yet he played a long first-round match and won. He is infamous for hypochondria.

Spanish sources, however, say that Ferrero was not injured on a tennis court at all. His ribs were hurt in a fall from a quad bike but -- for some financial reason -- he needed to pretend it was a tennis injury.

Not only that, when it was clear to him he could not give Andreev a game, he told the young Russian, just 20, he was out of it. Andreev is one of the huge squad of young players from around the world who train in Spain. He cruised to his straight-sets win.

Ferrero joined a casualty list that, in warfare, would lead to an emergency cabinet meeting. He and Justine Henin-Hardenne, last year's winners, have gone. Roddick, Agassi . . .

Little wonder that Hewitt was prepared to say after beating Jurgen Melzer that he was in this thing with a chance, something he has not been saying since he really does play down his claycourt potential.

Hewitt seems to be a more relaxed and all-round young man than he was. His friends say Kim Clijsters has played an important part in this.

Hewitt loves tennis and its history, and he traces his own successes through past events.

He made a rare error yesterday when he said Michael Chang had beaten Ivan Lendl in the final here. In fact, Chang beat Lendl in a fourth-round match before beating Stefan Edberg in the final. The point is that was in 1989 when Hewitt was eight and he will be mortified to have got it wrong.

One friend said that a new calmness ion Hewitt has come from not having the almost painful ambition he once had. He has now been the best in the world, has won two slams.

"Kim has shown him that he is good enough not to count numbers," the friend said.

Hewitt himself happily talks about maybe not being good enough to go the seven long matches on clay you need to do to win the French, in many ways the most intriguing of all the slams. Imagine the little scrapper of two or three years ago coming up with that.

Of Verkerk, Hewitt said: "I played Martin last week in Dusseldorf, had a very tough match with him, 7-5 in the third. Yeah, he likes playing in this place . . ."

You bet. Last year he beat two of the hot favourites. This year his form is patchy and he won his second-round match only when the Romanian Victor Hanescu withdrew in the fifth through injury or boredom.

Of Hewitt, Verkerk said: "It was a good match in Dusseldorf. I had my chances.

"I feel good playing against him. He's a great player . . . but I know I have my chances.

"A guy like Hewitt, you cannot speak of a weak surface. I mean, he's unbelievable on grass and hardcourt and he doesn't like clay as much.

"But, on the other hand, for me, he's a top-five player on every surface.

"He's tough anyway."

Danni
05-29-2004, 02:23 AM
good luck against Verkerk, lleyts :kiss:

ally_014
05-29-2004, 02:43 AM
Great article, thanks for that Tara! :D

And good luck tonight for Lleyton - I wanna wake up and see a win!

kim4eva
05-29-2004, 04:20 AM
Thanks for the article! :kiss:
Best of luck to Lleyton! :clap2: Hope the match doesn't go till midnight! :o

Gaga
05-29-2004, 08:44 AM
thans for the articles , and good luck Lleyton !
I think that it is going to gain, it beat has Dusseldorf, thus why not today!

Danni
05-29-2004, 12:02 PM
Great article, thanks for that Tara! :D

And good luck tonight for Lleyton - I wanna wake up and see a win!
ditto! :)

Jess
05-29-2004, 01:35 PM
That's a nice article :) Hopefully he'll do well against Verkerk. If he does his draw is looking very promising.

Federer is down 2 sets against Kuerten.

Gaga
05-29-2004, 02:25 PM
Kuerten-Federer 6-4/6-4/6-4

CONGRATULATIONS GUGA !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!:nerner

NOMAD
05-29-2004, 03:01 PM
Hewitt yells at himself, then defeats Melzer
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JEROME PUGMIRE / Associated Press
Posted: 1 day ago

PARIS (AP) — Lleyton Hewitt shattered the silence during his match at the French Open on Thursday.

"Shut up!" the former World No. 1 yelled - to himself.
Cruising at two sets up against Jurgen Melzer and with the score at 1-1 in the third, Hewitt missed a point, threw his racket into the ground, and then rubbed his temples as if to block out the nagging voices telling him he's not suited to clay.

The Australian eventually won his second-round match 6-4, 6-4, 4-6, 6-2 but said he has yet to feel totally comfortable on the surface.

"Naturally, I grew up playing on hard courts," Hewitt said. "I had to adjust my game a little bit for grass but more for clay. But with my style of game I don't think I can be totally counted out."

The 23-year-old has reached at least the third round stage in five of six appearances at Roland Garros but never passed the quarterfinals.

His upbringing on fast Australian hard courts remains a handicap when turning his attentions to the slow red clay each season.

Against the talented, but erratic, Melzer, Hewitt hit less winners than his Austrian opponent - 41-52 - but rarely looked in danger of losing control of the match.

Hewitt's two Grand Slams came at the U.S. Open in 2001 and Wimbledon in 2002.

"At the French Open, you need to win seven best-of-five matches on clay," he said. "That's one of the toughest things for me personally."

Hewitt has a tendency to let his temper get the best of him on clay. Against Melzer, he often showed his frustration.

When a Melzer shot clipped the net and looped slowly onto Hewitt's side of the court, the Australian lost the point.

"Ah yeah, that'd be right," he said out loud.

However, he feels his time will come on clay - having reached the semifinals of the Hamburg Masters and the final at the World Team Championship earlier this month.

"I feel pretty confident with my game at the moment," he said. "I'm moving a little better on clay purely because I've spent more time on it. But every time I come to the clay-court season I think it's going to take me a little while to get to my best."

Gaga
05-29-2004, 03:58 PM
verkerk serve

kim4eva
05-29-2004, 04:01 PM
Good luck Lleyton :bounce:

Gaga
05-29-2004, 04:01 PM
40-40

Gaga
05-29-2004, 04:03 PM
1-0 for lley :nerner:

Gaga
05-29-2004, 04:05 PM
2-0

Gaga
05-29-2004, 04:10 PM
2-1

Gaga
05-29-2004, 04:16 PM
3-1

Gaga
05-29-2004, 04:28 PM
4-1

Gaga
05-29-2004, 04:31 PM
5-1 :nerner:

Gaga
05-29-2004, 04:34 PM
5-2

Sunshine1
05-29-2004, 04:38 PM
He won the first set 6-2

Gaga
05-29-2004, 04:39 PM
1st set 6-2 ! :BigClap:

Gaga
05-29-2004, 04:43 PM
6-2/0-1

Gaga
05-29-2004, 04:52 PM
0-3

Gaga
05-29-2004, 04:57 PM
1-3

Gaga
05-29-2004, 04:59 PM
1-4

Gaga
05-29-2004, 05:06 PM
2-4

Gaga
05-29-2004, 05:06 PM
2-5

Gaga
05-29-2004, 05:10 PM
3-5

Gaga
05-29-2004, 05:15 PM
3-6

Gaga
05-29-2004, 07:04 PM
lleyton won the match 6-2/3-6/4-6/6-2/6-1

NOMAD
05-29-2004, 07:08 PM
Hewitt (AUS)
1st Serve % 67 of 117 = 57 %

Aces 7

Double Faults 4

Unforced Errors 16 :eek:

Winning % on 1st Serve 51 of 67 = 76 %

Winning % on 2nd Serve 28 of 50 = 56 %

Winners (Including Service) 33

Receiving Points Won 63 of 146 = 43 %

Break Point Conversions 7 of 18 = 39 %

Net Approaches 13 of 13 = 100 % :worship:

Total Points Won 142

Fastest Serve 188 km/h

Average 1st Serve Speed 166 km/h

Average 2nd Serve Speed 140 km/h

1st set Unforced Errors :0 :eek:
4 set 1st Serve % :87% :worship: :worship: :eek:

kim-fan
05-29-2004, 07:33 PM
wauw, I saw the match and he played great! :cool: :worship: well done lleyton ! :kiss:

Raquel
05-29-2004, 11:35 PM
Well done Lleyton! :worship: :bounce: :)

ally_014
05-30-2004, 02:34 AM
Just saw the highlights - it looked like he played well :) Good luck for the next round Lleyts!

Ashie_87
05-30-2004, 02:42 AM
:woohoo: :woohoo: :bounce: Go Lleyton!!!!

Danni
05-30-2004, 02:42 AM
:yippee: for Lleyts!!! good luck for round 4 :D :kiss:

Lisbeth
05-30-2004, 05:44 AM
Hooray for Lleyton! I watched some of the replay this morning - the last set in particular he was playing very well indeed - amd even with the 2nd and 3rd sets, who can argue with only 16 UEs in a 5 set match? You can only do what you can do when someone is serving like that up the other end. The commentators were making positive comments such as "this is where the hours on the practice court really show" and "he's obviously decided he's just not going to miss a ball". What I'm really pleased about, whatever happens in the 4th round, is that this is not just good clay tennis. It's really solid, classic Lleyton, all-court tennis. Woohoo!

Good luck v Costa or Malisse!

SomL.
05-30-2004, 06:00 AM
Good luck Lleyton in fourth round !!!!!!!!! Lleyton can do it ^_^

SomL.
05-30-2004, 06:06 AM
:angel: :angel: :angel: Go Lleyton tomorrow against Costa or Malisse !!!!!!!!!!! :angel: :angel: :angel:

SomL.
05-30-2004, 06:07 AM
Steely Hewitt calm under fire
By Nyree Epplett
Saturday, May 29, 2004

On Saturday at Roland Garros, the last remaining Aussie Lleyton Hewitt rallied from behind to out-muscle last year’s finalist Martin Verkerk 6-2 3-6 4-6 6-2 6-1 and move into the fourth round. The 12th seed is now just one match short of his best ever showing on the red clay here.

“I feel as good as I’ve ever probably felt on clay,” said the Aussie. “But going into the second week it doesn’t get any easier.”

And as much as he and every other fair dinkum Aussie would hate to admit it, Australia’s devastating first round Davis Cup demise might just have been a blessing in disguise for Hewitt in this event.

Today’s stirring win comes on the back of Hewitt’s most comprehensive claycourt season yet, made possible by Australia’s Davis Cup loss to Sweden in February. It gave the former world No1 the rare chance to get to Europe early and hone his skills on his least favorite surface. He came into this tournament with 14 gritty claycourt matches under his belt, more than ever before, and it showed on Court Suzanne Lenglen today.

During the two hour, 48 minute tussle, the steely Hewitt never let up, weathering a hearty Verkerk renaissance in the second and third sets and breaking the Dutchman’s spirit by reeling off 10 straight games to steal the victory.

The Aussie played a flawless first set, where he made no unforced errors, before the giant Dutchman hit a purple patch that lasted two whole sets. Verkerk upped the velocity on his groundstrokes, pushing Hewitt out to the sides of the court with his explosive power and perfect placement. He harnessed his brilliant one-handed backhand to secure a single service break in each set, and closed out the third with a 204km serve that clipped the top of Hewitt’s racquet and sprayed out into the stands. This was the same Verkerk who had beaten former champ Carlos Moya and Guillermo Coria enroute to the final last year. Throughout today’s encounter he blasted down 54 winners, including 18 aces.

“I’ve never seen a guy hit that many lines on his serve,” said Hewitt. “I guess that’s how he made the final last year.”

With his back to the wall, and down a break in the fourth (1-2), Hewitt staged a comeback of titanic proportions. Sniffing a lull in the Verkerk onslaught, the Aussie chopped up the pace and charged the net. The 19th seed, now clearly waning physically and mentally, played a string of loose points to hand Hewitt the next three service breaks and the set. He notched up 61 unforced errors for the match.

“I was just trying to get a start into his service game. It would have taken a hell of a lot to keep up that serve the whole of the match,” said the former Wimbledon and US Open champ.

Hewitt scrambled and counter-punched his way through the fourth and fifth sets, and finally broke Verkerk’s spirit with a brilliant topspin lob that handed the Aussie the vital break in the decider (2-0). The No12 seed raced to 5-0 in the fifth (10 games in a row) before Verkerk got back on the board.

“I knew that when I could get a look at his second serve that I had the opportunity to win the point…When you play a guy like that, you have to take your chances when you get them.

“I had to draw on everything I had out there today. I didn’t feel like I was playing badly, it was just an awkward match. I didn’t feel I was doing anything wrong.”

Hewitt has been flying the Aussie flag in Paris since round one, when the only other three Australian men in the tournament, tripped up on the ‘terre bateau’.

He now meets the winner of the clash between 2002 champ Albert Costa and Belgian Xavier Malisse for a berth in the quarter final. :p :) ;) :D :angel: :cool: :cool: :cool: :angel: :angel:

kim4eva
05-30-2004, 07:01 AM
Great job Lleyton :worship:
I watched his match from tape this morning and he played really good. He made so little UEs! It was a great match, much better than I expected from Lleyton :yeah:

Good luck against Costa or Xavier! :clap2:

Jess
05-30-2004, 01:32 PM
The Costa/Malisse match is now at 7/6 in the final set still on serve and now four hours fifteen minutes in :) This has to be good news for Lleyts and they are going to be exhausted after this!
Hopefully it keeps on for a while yet ;)

Gaga
05-30-2004, 01:35 PM
go malisse !!!

Gaga
05-30-2004, 01:38 PM
Lleyton play against malisse ! :nerner:

Jess
05-30-2004, 01:38 PM
Well it didn't go on much longer ;)
Malisse won 8-6 in the final set.

Gaga
05-30-2004, 01:38 PM
its a good new for lley !

NOMAD
05-30-2004, 04:04 PM
I think this is a nice article about LL's change :D

He's no longer flat and that's why Hewitt's feeling better than ever on clay
By Linda Pearce
May 31, 2004


Davis Cup coach Wally Masur has watched Lleyton Hewitt during the past week and noticed a slightly altered trajectory on his strokes than in French Opens past. Mark Woodforde had dinner with his fellow South Australian early last week and noted, approvingly, his slightly broader, stronger build.

Hewitt's coach Roger Rasheed told the former world No.1 after the US hardcourt season ended in Miami last month that they would not spend the European spring simply biding their time for Wimbledon, but would build for a grand-slam tournament that Hewitt could win. It has taken 14 sets and almost nine hours for the 12th seed to reach the last 16 here for the fourth time, but his tactical adjustments, physical toil and positive attitude have combined to assist his passage.

"I feel as good as I've probably ever felt on clay, I think, especially at this tournament," Hewitt said after Saturday's extraordinarily undulating 6-2, 3-6, 4-6, 6-2, 6-1 win over Martin Verkerk.

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"Going into this second week, though, it doesn't get any easier. We're not even through half the matches yet in a grand slam, it's going to get tougher and tougher - you expect that.

"Obviously knowing that I've been in this position of being in the second week of other slams, you know, it's a good feeling for me to have going into second weeks of slams. You know, I'm pretty happy with where my game's at at the moment. I played a lot more matches than I did last year on clay coming in."

Hewitt had to wait another day to discover whether his opponent would be Albert Costa or Xavier Malisse, with the pair's tense third-round duel stopped by bad light at 5-5 in the fourth set, Costa having won two of the first three.

But world No.1 Roger Federer is the latest to vacate the top half of the men's draw, and although Gaston Gaudio possibly awaits in the quarter-finals, Hewitt's opportunity to work his way through an increasingly open tournament has rarely, if ever, been better.

Not that his third round against Verkerk went exactly according to plan. Hewitt's first set was almost flawless, and for fully 40 minutes he made no unforced errors. Here, in the third round at Roland Garros, against last year's finalist, was the claycourt tennis Hewitt had been working towards, and had only occasionally produced.

Yet Verkerk was not playing that badly and in the second set opened his broad Dutch shoulders just a little, put some more stick on his serve and groundstrokes, and lifted a notch or two. And when he went, Hewitt could not go with him.

For the next two-and-a-bit sets, Verkerk thrashed 29 winners, attacked Hewitt's second serve, and played with little margin for error, which was fine, because none was needed.

But the 19th seed then turned as cold as he had been hot, and from 2-1 with a break, the mistakes started to flow as freely as had the brilliance. He started to miss shots he had been making, as his concentration lapsed and his big feet slowed.

Hewitt will never tire in a match, or at least he will never show it, but Verkerk called a trainer for a leg rub at the end of the fourth set, having lost five consecutive games.

Verkerk dropped five more to start the fifth, the second on his own serve due to an inspired Hewitt forehand lob and the Australian completed the kill.

Whether it came quickly and easily enough is the question that will be answered soon enough, for in this slam above all others it is not just victory that matters but the time and energy expended en route.

The bonus for Hewitt is that his opponent will not have a full rest day, needing first to complete the job postponed.

"I had to draw on everything I had out there, no doubt about it," Hewitt said. "But I feel pretty good. It wasn't that gruelling a match, I wouldn't think. A lot of rallies were pretty short."

Tactically, Masur has noticed Hewitt is no longer hitting with such a flat, fast-courter's trajectory, the adjustment helping to counteract the traditional clay-courters' low-paced, high-bouncing groundstrokes.

Physically, too, the Davis Cup mentor has seen changes, which began during Hewitt's extended football-style pre-season before last year's Davis Cup final.

"He's got another year's work in his legs, he's 23 now, he's that little bit stronger, he's that little bit heavier, and he's playing with a bit more margin," Masur said. "He's also using the court very well on clay. He's that one year wiser.

"He has great respect for the claycourt games of Gaudio and [Guillermo] Coria and those guys, and history would suggest - well, he's won Wimbledon and he's won the US Open - that he likes a bit of pace to work with.

"But he's made a conscious decision to play with a bit more flight, and I think it'll pay dividends. I think he does think he can win this tournament, and, quietly, I think he and Roger are going about their business very well."

NOMAD
05-30-2004, 04:15 PM
LENGLEN 12:00 Start
1. Men's Singles - 4th Rnd.
Igor Andreev (RUS) v. Gaston Gaudio (ARG)
followed by:
2. Men's Singles - 4th Rnd.
Lleyton Hewitt (AUS)[12] v. Xavier Malisse (BEL)

Gaga
05-30-2004, 07:24 PM
good luck lley against xav !

ally_014
05-31-2004, 02:18 AM
Thanks for the articles - if Wally thinks he's going well then I'm happy! :p

Good luck tonight Lleyton! :bounce:

kim4eva
05-31-2004, 08:58 AM
Good luck Lleyton! :clap2:

Gaga
05-31-2004, 10:02 AM
Good luck !:nerner:

SomL.
05-31-2004, 11:08 AM
Good luck Lleyton in fourth round !!!!!! Go Lleyton against Malisse Today ^_^

Ashie_87
05-31-2004, 11:12 AM
Go Lleyton! :bounce:

Lynne
05-31-2004, 03:47 PM
Lleyton is 2 sets up against Xavier !! C'mon!! :)

Goonergal
05-31-2004, 04:45 PM
Lleyton won :D

7-5, 6-2, 7-6(8-6)

Xavier was ahead in the 1st and 3rd sets but LL still prevailed :worship:

Onto Gaudio in the QF's which will be a very touch match.

NOMAD
05-31-2004, 06:01 PM
interview video updates at FO website

very cute reaction after the third question :hearts: :lol:
(must see! ;) )

NOMAD
05-31-2004, 06:14 PM
Q. You did a great job today of taking away his most important weapon, his forehand groundstroke. How much of that do you reckon was you just breaking him down and how much of that was him just being off his forehand today?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, his forehand's obviously his biggest weapon. But, you know, out there, especially towards the end of the first set when I was able to turn the match around from 5-3 down, his forehand was his actual shot that was starting to make more mistakes. His backhand was very consistent out there. His forehand was very good if it was in a slot.

If I was able to move him around and open up his forehand by going to his backhand a little bit, that's how I actually felt I was getting a lot more cheap points out there.

You know, so I tried to keep him on the move as much as possible.

Q. Did you ever feel threatened at all in the backhand-backhand rallies?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, he's got a good backhand. He doesn't make a lot of errors. But, you know, I back myself most times.

Q. How did it feel out there?

LLEYTON HEWITT: It felt all right. No, it felt pretty good. Felt heavy conditions out there today. Felt like there was a lot of -- a bit of moisture in the air, as well. Made it even heavier. You know, it was tough to hit winners out there, especially off the serves. That's why there were a lot of opportunities to break serves out there today, in both our cases.

You know, for me, I was just happy to get out of, you know, that third set and get off the court, you know, in a straight sets win instead of going to four, maybe five.

Q. Shaky start to the tiebreaker, then he gets up 6-3. You force him to play back in. He makes a few errors. You make the great backhand volley at the 6-All point, close it out. Did you think you were going to the fourth set? Did you still have confidence that maybe he'd make the error?

LLEYTON HEWITT: At 6-3, I was just trying to worry about getting my two service points. I felt like if I got it back to 6-5, I knew he was going to go for a big first serve and try and, you know, hit an ace or an unreturnable. He ended up missing the first serve. I got a look at a second serve. He made a soft error. I was going to play the percentages. I wasn't going to give him a cheap point.

At 6-All, I felt I was in good shape. Hit a good forehand, came into the net, put the pressure on him.

Q. What were your expectations coming into this tournament?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I didn't really put any pressure or goals on myself at all. You know, I came here, you know, hoping to do well. You know, you never know with this tournament. I think there's, you know, so many times you can have so many tough matches in the early stages of the tournament, you could wear yourself out towards the end.

You know, draws open up. So for me, I was just taking it a match at a time, just worrying about who my next opponent was.

Q. You said last year when you were beaten by Robredo, you didn't know what you'd have to bring to your game to win the title here. Have you brought anything different to your game and is it something that can win you the title?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Don't know. I'm still a long way away from winning the title. For me, you know, I'm through to the quarters. I play Gaudio, who I've had some very tough matches with in the past. So, yeah, I'm not even thinking about the title right at the moment. Then again, I feel like I'm probably a little bit stronger out there at the moment. It's probably definitely helping more so on this surface than anything else.

Yeah, I just feel -- my preparation coming in this year, I was able to play a few more tournaments due to how I was feeling physically compared to last year. I think, you know, the more I play on this surface, the more confident I get.

Q. Can you give us your thoughts on having Tim Henman alongside in the quarters?

LLEYTON HEWITT: It's great (smiling).

Q. Pleased for him?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Another English-speaking guy. There's not many guys in the locker room I can talk to.

No, you know, Tim plays well on this surface. You know, he's very -- you know, I think in the past, last couple years, I've seen him make I think the semis in Monte-Carlo a couple years ago, beat a lot of good clay court players. He's got an awkward game.

Not a lot of the typical clay court guys play against a guy like Tim Henman who plays that style of game. You know, it's good for him. For him to win matches here, obviously, you know, in another Grand Slam, probably the least you'd think favorite Grand Slam, performance-wise, with his game, it's a real good effort.

Q. But you obviously have a fantastic record against him. Is that because there's like the target with him coming at the net?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I don't know. You'll have to ask him (smiling).

Q. There's a player from Brazil in the quarterfinals and four from Argentina. You will play against one of them. Are you about to stop this "South American championships"?

LLEYTON HEWITT: There's a few of them, producing a lot of good players. I don't know what you feed them down there, but they're doing something right.

Yeah, they really play well, and obviously on this surface. They've grown up on this surface. The four Argentinians and obviously, you know, Guga, he speaks for himself. The Argentinians are younger guys, you know, on the way up, as well.

Q. You just spoke about not thinking about winning the title. When in your own mind in a Grand Slam do you start thinking, within your own thoughts, that you could win the thing?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I try to block it out as much as possible till, you know, you make the final, you know, for me. And even then, you know, you try and prepare as though it's just another match. But it's very hard to block out, you know, that you're playing for a Grand Slam title.

You know, it's been the case in, you know, at Wimbledon and the US Open I think when I've, you know, gone through. I think I haven't tried to, you know, do anything special, start focusing on my chance to win this title. I've tried to block it out as much as possible.

Q. Pretty good at doing that?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Paid off those two times.

Q. You said you've had some tough ones against Gaudio. Can you be more specific? What do you recall of individual matches or events that were tough?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I played him last week in Dusseldorf, 7-6 in the third. I played him in Monte-Carlo in the second round. Saved a couple of match points, ended up getting out of it in three sets. I've had some tough matches. This is his best surface.

You know, he's very confident on this surface. So, you know, I got to go out there, you know, and stay aggressive and play my game and, you know, stay confident out there.

Q. Your patience on the court, particularly in the long rallies, has been exceptional in this tournament, particularly today against a player with this kind of speed who can hit the ball in so many ways. Do you ever remember grinding this well in the previous French Opens that you've played? Do you ever remember having this much patience on the court?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, probably not in, you know, the other French Opens that I played. I think this is the best so far, you know, patience and being able to grind it out. You know, I think there's been a lot of other tournaments, though, where I've been very patient out on the court.

But, you know, French Open-wise, this has probably been the best.

Q. Does that come about from being older and having more experience or has something else changed for you?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Not really. I just feel nothing's really changed, I don't think, that much. You know, I feel confident out there. I believe in myself, you know, I believe in my ability that I can match it with the best guys on this surface.

You know, I guess playing a few more tournaments, having some good matches under my belt, you know, including Dusseldorf last week against some worthy clay court players, you know, I think, you know, just to have that in the back of your mind more than anything.

Q. Is Gaudio the type of guy who in the past has given you more problems than, say, Verkerk or Malisse? Is he someone you feel is more of a challenge in style of play?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, they all propose a big challenge, I think, you know, especially at this stage of the tournament. You know, he's a different player to Xavier, and obviously a different player to Martin.

You know, Martin gave me as much as I could handle a couple of days ago. So, you know, it's not going to be any easier, but it's going to be a different, you know, type of match.

Q. You were in the quarters three years ago. Can you compare the two stories, the player you were then and the player you are now?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I think I'm a lot better player on clay overall now, day in, day out. Back then I think I played some good matches on clay. In the Round of 16, I came back from two-sets-to-love against Canas three years ago, had to finish the match the next day, and basically had very little in the tank to play Ferrero the next day - who was too good anyway for me on that occasion.

So I feel like I'm a better player now than I was then, and more experienced obviously on this surface.

Q. How much is being a two-time Slam champ and No. 1 play into how you're playing at the Slams, especially when other guys like Malisse comes up against you, tight spot in the third, looks like you're thinking you can still win the set and he's starting to doubt himself when it gets tight?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, well, you know, I guess I know that I've been there and done it before. I've been in, you know, a few second weeks of Grand Slams, and come through them on a couple occasions. You know, I think, yeah, knowing that you've been in those situations and you've been able to get through them, that's always at the back of your mind.

Whether that's in the back of my opponent's mind, I'm not sure. But, you know, I think that's my attitude more than anything, as well, that never-say-die attitude out there.

Q. Has that changed at all for you in the last couple years, being it will be two years at Wimbledon since you last won a Slam? When you've gone into every Grand Slam since then, have you had more doubts than when you were dominating?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No, I haven't had any doubts, you know, going in. You know, I felt like always the French Open I think, you know, it's probably more open or, you know, I've never been, even when I was at No. 1 in the world, I wasn't one of the big favorites, I don't think, to win this title. And I'm probably a better player now than I was a couple years ago on this surface, I think.

You know, but I haven't had any more doubts I think going into Grand Slams at all.

Q. Do you remember the last time you blistered while on court?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No, I can't remember.

Q. You don't tend to blister at all?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No. I got some callouses.

Q. Do you take any precautions about blistering during the course of the season?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No. The blisters are -- you can't do much about them really. They pop up. It's just a bit of bad luck.

Q. In the third set, Malisse had seven chances to break. He gets only the seventh point. What made the difference in the tiebreak? Was it your mental ability or was it just luck?

LLEYTON HEWITT: You know, I just, you know, tried to hang in there more than anything. You know, 6-3 up, I knew, as I said before, I just had to try, you know, for me try and get through those two service points, get it to 6-5, at least make him think about it at 6-5 serving for it, that he's wasted two previous opportunities, and this could be his last set point.

Yeah, he got a little bit tight on that point, then I played a good point at 6-All, put the pressure on him, was able to win it on my serve.

Q. First two sets, you played steady. He made a ton of errors at the end of the first set. You got away with that. Easy second set. Third set, he started hitting the lines more. How confident are you that you can go from defense to offense when you want to?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I felt confident out there. You know, I didn't have a lot of opportunities in the third set to break him as much as I did, you know, the end of the first set and throughout the whole second set. I felt like I was really on top of the match at that stage.

The third set, to his credit, he came out and played better again. He played like he did at the start of the match. But I felt like I was able still -- I just needed to hang with him and take my opportunities. You know, you get to a tiebreak, and anything can happen - like it did.

Gaga
05-31-2004, 07:09 PM
thanks good job lley and good luck for the quarters !

tangerine_dream
05-31-2004, 09:54 PM
My favorite quote of the French Open so far:

"It's great, another English-speaking guy in the locker room. There's not many I can talk to." --Lleyton Hewitt is delighted Henman is in the quarters.

Hahahahaha! I love that these two guys -- the ones who hate clay -- are in the Quarters will all the "clay court specialists". Love it! :angel:

I'm also loving Lleyton's outfit. And he's wearing dark shorts underneath too! To quote Dick Enberg: Oh my! :hearts: :drool:

http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/ap/20040531/capt.rog15205311629.french_open_rog152.jpg

Raquel
05-31-2004, 11:39 PM
Well done Lleyton :worship: :)

Great fighting today and good luck Wednesday :D

Andrew.
06-01-2004, 03:08 AM
Great job Lleyton. :D

Lisbeth
06-01-2004, 03:44 AM
:bounce: Yay Lleyton! Great job! Good luck against Gaudio!

NOMAD
06-01-2004, 06:19 AM
an artcle before yesterday's match
LL seems to ask some advices from Kim :eek: :angel:


Hewitt looks to Clijsters for insider information
May 30, 2004

PARIS, May 30 AAP - Lleyton Hewitt will call on fiancee Kim Clijsters for some advice as his most promising French Open campaign continues against her Belgian compatriot Xavier Malisse tomorrow.



If Hewitt can get past Malisse in their fourth round match, he will never have a better chance of winning the title at Roland Garros. While defending champion Juan Carlos Ferrero and top seed Roger Federer have both disappeared from his side of the draw, the Australian is playing the best clay court tennis of his career.


Kim Clijsters watches her future husband, Lleyton Hewitt, advance to the fourth round of the French Open.

After an overnight wait to find out his fourth round opponent, Hewitt meets Malisse with a 2-1 career record over him and some helpful inside knowledge from women's world No.2 Clijsters who went through the Belgian junior program with the world No.54.

"Kim grew up with him, she knows his game, she can help me for sure," Hewitt said. "Xavier is a flashy player, he's got all the shots. He's one of the most talented players out there."


Beyond the fourth round, 12th seed Hewitt stares at a quarter final where defending champion Juan Carlos Ferrero would have been and a semi where top seed Roger Federer was expected to appear.

Federer's defeat to three-time champion Gustavo Kuerten yesterday and Ferrero's loss on Thursday to Igor Andreev have ripped the top half of the draw wide open.

Hewitt and Argentina's No.8 David Nalbandian are the top two seeds left in their half and could meet in the semi while Hewitt's potential quarter final opponents are either unseeded pair Gaston Gaudio or Andreev.

But the former world No.1 only rated himself on the second tier of players coming into Roland Garros and continued to play down his chances of becoming the first Australian to win the French Open since Rod Laver in 1969.

"I don't know about that. There's a lot of good players still left," Hewitt said. "There's a reason that Ferrero and Federer are out of the tournament, because they lost to guys that were too good for them on the day. You've just got to take one match at a time."

Hewitt, 23, barged his way into the fourth round at Roland Garros with a typically feisty come from behind win in five sets against last year's finalist Martin Verkerk.
On the way to his 6-2 3-6 4-6 6-2 6-1 win over the Dutch 19th seed, he showed a standard on the clay he has rarely met before and is obviously benefiting from an extensive buildup in Europe in which he won nine of 14 matches on his least favourite surface.

"I feel as good as I've ever probably felt on clay, especially at this tournament," he said. "Going into the second week though, it doesn't get any easier. It's going to get tougher and tougher, you expect that."

The 2001 US Open and 2002 Wimbledon champion looked gone against Verkerk when he was down two sets to one and was broken in his second service game of the fourth set.
But he turned the match around when he immediately broke Verkerk back and won the next four games to take the fourth set in 18 minutes.

After struggling to get a look in on Verkerk's booming serve, Hewitt broke the tiring beanpole five times in a row to completely dominate the latter stages of the match.
"I had to draw on everything I had out there today," Hewitt said.

"It's very satisfying getting through matches like that."
Malisse finally won his third round match against Albert Costa 6-4 2-6 4-6 7-6 8-6 after they were stranded overnight at 5-5 in the fourth set.

Hagar
06-01-2004, 10:47 AM
My favorite quote of the French Open so far:

"It's great, another English-speaking guy in the locker room. There's not many I can talk to." --Lleyton Hewitt is delighted Henman is in the quarters.

Hahahahaha! I love that these two guys -- the ones who hate clay -- are in the Quarters will all the "clay court specialists". Love it! :angel:

I'm also loving Lleyton's outfit. And he's wearing dark shorts underneath too! To quote Dick Enberg: Oh my! :hearts: :drool:

http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/ap/20040531/capt.rog15205311629.french_open_rog152.jpg

Yeah, it's great to have Lleyton and Tim still there. The other guys must be thinking: "Why do these two still hang out in the locker room?"

kim4eva
06-01-2004, 11:00 AM
Q. You did a great job today of taking away his most important weapon, his forehand groundstroke. How much of that do you reckon was you just breaking him down and how much of that was him just being off his forehand today?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, his forehand's obviously his biggest weapon. But, you know, out there, especially towards the end of the first set when I was able to turn the match around from 5-3 down, his forehand was his actual shot that was starting to make more mistakes. His backhand was very consistent out there. His forehand was very good if it was in a slot.

If I was able to move him around and open up his forehand by going to his backhand a little bit, that's how I actually felt I was getting a lot more cheap points out there.

You know, so I tried to keep him on the move as much as possible.

Q. Did you ever feel threatened at all in the backhand-backhand rallies?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, he's got a good backhand. He doesn't make a lot of errors. But, you know, I back myself most times.

Q. How did it feel out there?

LLEYTON HEWITT: It felt all right. No, it felt pretty good. Felt heavy conditions out there today. Felt like there was a lot of -- a bit of moisture in the air, as well. Made it even heavier. You know, it was tough to hit winners out there, especially off the serves. That's why there were a lot of opportunities to break serves out there today, in both our cases.

You know, for me, I was just happy to get out of, you know, that third set and get off the court, you know, in a straight sets win instead of going to four, maybe five.

Q. Shaky start to the tiebreaker, then he gets up 6-3. You force him to play back in. He makes a few errors. You make the great backhand volley at the 6-All point, close it out. Did you think you were going to the fourth set? Did you still have confidence that maybe he'd make the error?

LLEYTON HEWITT: At 6-3, I was just trying to worry about getting my two service points. I felt like if I got it back to 6-5, I knew he was going to go for a big first serve and try and, you know, hit an ace or an unreturnable. He ended up missing the first serve. I got a look at a second serve. He made a soft error. I was going to play the percentages. I wasn't going to give him a cheap point.

At 6-All, I felt I was in good shape. Hit a good forehand, came into the net, put the pressure on him.

Q. What were your expectations coming into this tournament?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I didn't really put any pressure or goals on myself at all. You know, I came here, you know, hoping to do well. You know, you never know with this tournament. I think there's, you know, so many times you can have so many tough matches in the early stages of the tournament, you could wear yourself out towards the end.

You know, draws open up. So for me, I was just taking it a match at a time, just worrying about who my next opponent was.

Q. You said last year when you were beaten by Robredo, you didn't know what you'd have to bring to your game to win the title here. Have you brought anything different to your game and is it something that can win you the title?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Don't know. I'm still a long way away from winning the title. For me, you know, I'm through to the quarters. I play Gaudio, who I've had some very tough matches with in the past. So, yeah, I'm not even thinking about the title right at the moment. Then again, I feel like I'm probably a little bit stronger out there at the moment. It's probably definitely helping more so on this surface than anything else.

Yeah, I just feel -- my preparation coming in this year, I was able to play a few more tournaments due to how I was feeling physically compared to last year. I think, you know, the more I play on this surface, the more confident I get.

Q. Can you give us your thoughts on having Tim Henman alongside in the quarters?

LLEYTON HEWITT: It's great (smiling).

Q. Pleased for him?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Another English-speaking guy. There's not many guys in the locker room I can talk to.

No, you know, Tim plays well on this surface. You know, he's very -- you know, I think in the past, last couple years, I've seen him make I think the semis in Monte-Carlo a couple years ago, beat a lot of good clay court players. He's got an awkward game.

Not a lot of the typical clay court guys play against a guy like Tim Henman who plays that style of game. You know, it's good for him. For him to win matches here, obviously, you know, in another Grand Slam, probably the least you'd think favorite Grand Slam, performance-wise, with his game, it's a real good effort.

Q. But you obviously have a fantastic record against him. Is that because there's like the target with him coming at the net?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I don't know. You'll have to ask him (smiling).

Q. There's a player from Brazil in the quarterfinals and four from Argentina. You will play against one of them. Are you about to stop this "South American championships"?

LLEYTON HEWITT: There's a few of them, producing a lot of good players. I don't know what you feed them down there, but they're doing something right.

Yeah, they really play well, and obviously on this surface. They've grown up on this surface. The four Argentinians and obviously, you know, Guga, he speaks for himself. The Argentinians are younger guys, you know, on the way up, as well.

Q. You just spoke about not thinking about winning the title. When in your own mind in a Grand Slam do you start thinking, within your own thoughts, that you could win the thing?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I try to block it out as much as possible till, you know, you make the final, you know, for me. And even then, you know, you try and prepare as though it's just another match. But it's very hard to block out, you know, that you're playing for a Grand Slam title.

You know, it's been the case in, you know, at Wimbledon and the US Open I think when I've, you know, gone through. I think I haven't tried to, you know, do anything special, start focusing on my chance to win this title. I've tried to block it out as much as possible.

Q. Pretty good at doing that?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Paid off those two times.

Q. You said you've had some tough ones against Gaudio. Can you be more specific? What do you recall of individual matches or events that were tough?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I played him last week in Dusseldorf, 7-6 in the third. I played him in Monte-Carlo in the second round. Saved a couple of match points, ended up getting out of it in three sets. I've had some tough matches. This is his best surface.

You know, he's very confident on this surface. So, you know, I got to go out there, you know, and stay aggressive and play my game and, you know, stay confident out there.

Q. Your patience on the court, particularly in the long rallies, has been exceptional in this tournament, particularly today against a player with this kind of speed who can hit the ball in so many ways. Do you ever remember grinding this well in the previous French Opens that you've played? Do you ever remember having this much patience on the court?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, probably not in, you know, the other French Opens that I played. I think this is the best so far, you know, patience and being able to grind it out. You know, I think there's been a lot of other tournaments, though, where I've been very patient out on the court.

But, you know, French Open-wise, this has probably been the best.

Q. Does that come about from being older and having more experience or has something else changed for you?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Not really. I just feel nothing's really changed, I don't think, that much. You know, I feel confident out there. I believe in myself, you know, I believe in my ability that I can match it with the best guys on this surface.

You know, I guess playing a few more tournaments, having some good matches under my belt, you know, including Dusseldorf last week against some worthy clay court players, you know, I think, you know, just to have that in the back of your mind more than anything.

Q. Is Gaudio the type of guy who in the past has given you more problems than, say, Verkerk or Malisse? Is he someone you feel is more of a challenge in style of play?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, they all propose a big challenge, I think, you know, especially at this stage of the tournament. You know, he's a different player to Xavier, and obviously a different player to Martin.

You know, Martin gave me as much as I could handle a couple of days ago. So, you know, it's not going to be any easier, but it's going to be a different, you know, type of match.

Q. You were in the quarters three years ago. Can you compare the two stories, the player you were then and the player you are now?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I think I'm a lot better player on clay overall now, day in, day out. Back then I think I played some good matches on clay. In the Round of 16, I came back from two-sets-to-love against Canas three years ago, had to finish the match the next day, and basically had very little in the tank to play Ferrero the next day - who was too good anyway for me on that occasion.

So I feel like I'm a better player now than I was then, and more experienced obviously on this surface.

Q. How much is being a two-time Slam champ and No. 1 play into how you're playing at the Slams, especially when other guys like Malisse comes up against you, tight spot in the third, looks like you're thinking you can still win the set and he's starting to doubt himself when it gets tight?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, well, you know, I guess I know that I've been there and done it before. I've been in, you know, a few second weeks of Grand Slams, and come through them on a couple occasions. You know, I think, yeah, knowing that you've been in those situations and you've been able to get through them, that's always at the back of your mind.

Whether that's in the back of my opponent's mind, I'm not sure. But, you know, I think that's my attitude more than anything, as well, that never-say-die attitude out there.

Q. Has that changed at all for you in the last couple years, being it will be two years at Wimbledon since you last won a Slam? When you've gone into every Grand Slam since then, have you had more doubts than when you were dominating?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No, I haven't had any doubts, you know, going in. You know, I felt like always the French Open I think, you know, it's probably more open or, you know, I've never been, even when I was at No. 1 in the world, I wasn't one of the big favorites, I don't think, to win this title. And I'm probably a better player now than I was a couple years ago on this surface, I think.

You know, but I haven't had any more doubts I think going into Grand Slams at all.

Q. Do you remember the last time you blistered while on court?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No, I can't remember.

Q. You don't tend to blister at all?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No. I got some callouses.

Q. Do you take any precautions about blistering during the course of the season?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No. The blisters are -- you can't do much about them really. They pop up. It's just a bit of bad luck.

Q. In the third set, Malisse had seven chances to break. He gets only the seventh point. What made the difference in the tiebreak? Was it your mental ability or was it just luck?

LLEYTON HEWITT: You know, I just, you know, tried to hang in there more than anything. You know, 6-3 up, I knew, as I said before, I just had to try, you know, for me try and get through those two service points, get it to 6-5, at least make him think about it at 6-5 serving for it, that he's wasted two previous opportunities, and this could be his last set point.

Yeah, he got a little bit tight on that point, then I played a good point at 6-All, put the pressure on him, was able to win it on my serve.

Q. First two sets, you played steady. He made a ton of errors at the end of the first set. You got away with that. Easy second set. Third set, he started hitting the lines more. How confident are you that you can go from defense to offense when you want to?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I felt confident out there. You know, I didn't have a lot of opportunities in the third set to break him as much as I did, you know, the end of the first set and throughout the whole second set. I felt like I was really on top of the match at that stage.

The third set, to his credit, he came out and played better again. He played like he did at the start of the match. But I felt like I was able still -- I just needed to hang with him and take my opportunities. You know, you get to a tiebreak, and anything can happen - like it did.

Thanks for the interview :kiss:
:scratch: does Lleyton say that many you-knows? Seems like there's a lot :p

kim4eva
06-01-2004, 11:28 AM
Sort out drug issue: Lleyton
June 1, 2004

LLEYTON HEWITT has enhanced his reputation as a player who performs best while embroiled in controversy by delivering a forehand jolt to officials over drug-testing procedures.

Hewitt, who today defeated Belgian Xavier Malisse for a place in the French Open quarter-finals, looked the angry young man of old as he claimed there are major problems in the system.

Forty-four players in 2002-03 tested positive to banned substances - a figure which was blamed on electrolyte replacement products administered by official ATP trainers.

Hewitt thrives under pressure and any controversy appears to get his adrenalin pumping.

After showing glimpses of his best ever clay-court form here at Roland Garros, Hewitt said: "There's a problem in the testing procedure somewhere along the line.

"At the end of the day, the ATP has to stand up and go through the whole background of it and work out where [these drug positives] are coming from.

"They have to try and get the whole drug issue out of the media spotlight for the sport of tennis."

Hewitt said earlier this year he had some doubts over players who "look stronger in the fifth set than the first. You have to wonder about that".

He said he strictly controls what he eats and drinks and says he does not take legal nutritional supplements. He revealed he had been drug-tested up to 16 times last year.

Controversy has never been far from Hewitt on his journey to two-time world No.1 and his recent fall from the top. He is still involved in a protracted legal case with the ATP over his fine for not appearing for a television interview in 2002.

British player Greg Rusedski was cleared of drugs charges in March but during his case it was revealed 36 other players had recorded low levels of nandrolone which did not constitute a doping offence.

The Daily Telegraph

NOMAD
06-01-2004, 04:03 PM
Hewitt's revival 'can lead to title'
By Linda Pearce
Paris
June 2, 2004

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Lleyton Hewitt is through to the quarter-finals of the French Open.
Picture:Getty Images
Todd Woodbridge, Lleyton Hewitt's long-time Davis Cup teammate, believes the former world No. 1 is capable of claiming Australia's first French Open title since Rod Laver's most recent success 35 years ago if he can overcome Gaston Gaudio in the quarter-finals today.

"Gaudio's a hard one," Woodbridge said of the unseeded baseliner who stands between Hewitt and a semi-final place last filled by an Australian when Pat Rafter lost to Sergi Bruguera in 1997. "If Lleyton beats Gaudio, he can win the tournament.

"This is the hardest (major) for him to win. His game here has a little less margin for error than for the claycourters who have a bit more heavy spin and a little bit more height over the net, but this is the best preparation he's ever had.

"He's played more matches, won more matches than in previous years, so he's given himself the best chance, and I don't think you want to play him when he's like that."

Hewitt agrees that this is as well as he has ever played at Roland Garros, having saved five set points in Monday's third-set tie-breaker against Xavier Malisse before recording his first straight-sets win of the tournament 7-5, 6-2, 7-6 (8-6).

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While the match was within two minutes of his shortest time-wise, it was another demanding contest, but his capacity to absorb and respond to the free-stroking Belgian helps rank it highly among his recent claycourt wins.

"I'm not even thinking about the title right at the moment," Hewitt said. "Then again, I feel like I'm probably a little bit stronger out there, and it's definitely helping, more so on this surface.

"(In) my preparation coming in this year, I was able to play a few more tournaments due to how I was feeling physically compared with last year, and the more I play on this surface, the more confident I get.

"I think this is the best French Open so far (in terms of) patience and being able to grind it out. I believe in myself, in my ability that I can match it with the best guys on this surface."

The Crows aside, Hewitt's first sporting love is of the contest, and Gaudio should provide one on Court Philippe Chatrier, where Hewitt has yet to be invited in the four rounds of the tournament so far.

He has rather quietly gone about his business outside, beating Arnaud Di Pasquale and Jurgen Melzer in four sets, 2003 finalist Martin Verkerk in five, and Malisse, finally, in three.

Yet if Hewitt has equalled his personal-best here, achieved in 2001, he has not yet exceeded his own pre-tournament expectations because, he insists, he had none. "I didn't really put any pressure or goals on myself at all. I came here, you know, hoping to do well," he said. "You never know with this tournament. I think there's so many times you can have so many tough matches in the early stages of the tournament, you could wear yourself out towards the end. You know, draws open up."

As this one has, and as much respect as Gaudio commands on his pet surface - he is rated by Carlos Moya as the most talented of the Argentinians - he has never passed the French Open's fourth round, and won the most recent of his two minor claycourt titles in 2002.

Rather like Hewitt himself, Gaudio is a formidable retriever who can be vulnerable on his second serve. Unlike Hewitt, his weakness can sometimes be in his mind.

The pair have met twice on clay this year, Hewitt winning in three sets in Monte Carlo in April, and Gaudio claiming the third-set tie-breaker in the World Team Cup 11 days ago. "I've never played against him with five sets, but in the quarter-finals of a grand slam, it's going to be tough, like the other ones," Gaudio said.

Hewitt's most recent grand slam semi-final was at the 2002 United States Open, when he reigned as Wimbledon champion and world No. 1. Much has happened since, including a severe rankings dip from which he is only now recovering.

But a Hewitt win would guarantee a reprise against either three-time champion Gustavo Kuerten, who eliminated Feliciano Lopez in straight sets, or eighth seed David Nalbandian, who needed four to subdue a painfully blistered Marat Safin.

The Argentinians' unprecedented grand slam success in providing four of the men's quarter-finalists has been one of the stories of the tournament, and the fact that another South American (Kuerten), and a Spaniard (Moya), are joined by two English speakers in the last eight prompted Hewitt to quip that, Tim Henman aside, "there's not many guys in the locker room I can talk to".

His racquet has done adequately so far, and Woodbridge sees signs of the old Hewitt re-emerging. "He's relaxed, he's in a good comfort zone, and his confidence is returning; where maybe he'd had a little bit of a knock in terms of he hadn't really played as many matches, he's getting that back under control again," Woodbridge said.

"He plays his best when he's just out there playing, and it becomes more instinctive . . ."

Gaga
06-01-2004, 07:23 PM
thanks for the articles !!! Gaudio-Lleyton is the first match in a principal court ! Good luck lleyton ! COME ON :nerner:

kit
06-01-2004, 09:48 PM
Good luck against Gaudio tomorrow!!! :bounce: :bounce: :bounce:
Come on Lleyton, you can beat him. :worship: :worship: :worship: I believe in you and cross all my fingers.

Zoecrick
06-02-2004, 12:25 AM
interview video updates at FO website

very cute reaction after the third question :hearts: :lol:
(must see! ;) )Could you tell me what the third question was an what his reation was? As I am unable to see it, thank you!!

SomL.
06-02-2004, 09:46 AM
Good luck Lleyton to quarter final round !!!!!! Come on Lleyton !!!!!!! Go Lleyton against Gaudio today ^_^ Lleyton can do it ^_^

Gaga
06-02-2004, 01:32 PM
:sad::sad::sad:It is ended for Lleyton who made eliminated by Gaston Gaudio 6-3/6-2/6-2. It is pity but a quarterfinal in a tournament of the big slam made for a long time!:sad::sad::sad:

Jess
06-02-2004, 02:59 PM
The interview :rolleyes: He doesn't seem too disappointed, but then again he never does these days really.... :scratch: I miss stroppy Lleyts ;) The one who would barely say two words when he lost a match ;) He was funny. Now he's polite and gives them real answers!

Q. Just a matter of coming up against someone who knows how to play on clay?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah. Yeah, he was too good. You know, there was -- you know, I tried hanging in there. You know, trying a few different things out there.

You know, I just didn't feel like I was hitting the ball as cleanly as I've probably been hitting it over the last week or so.

You know, against a guy like that, you know, he's very confident at the moment, especially on this surface, I think. And, you know, his movement's as good as anyone's on this surface.

Q. How much did you learn this week or in the last few weeks on how to play on clay yourself?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Well, I'd like to think that I learned, you know, a fair bit, I think every time. But I think only time will tell. You know, when I look back on, you know, there's not that much time now to reflect before you're in another big tournament in a couple weeks' time.

You know, I guess when you sit down and think about the whole clay court season, I'm sure I'll reflect, you know, on the positives and negatives. You know, I think there was a lot of positives to, you know, come out of the last couple of months.

Q. They flashed a stat near the end of the match saying Gaudio made something like seven forehand errors the entire match. Have you played a guy who has been as steady off that side recently?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I don't know how many backhand errors he made. But, you know, normally, his backhand is one of the best single-hand backhands out there, and I think everybody knows that. His forehand occasionally lets him down, but it's not a real weakness, I don't think, and especially on this surface, because he changes from defense to offense as well as anyone I think out there. You know, even though he's sometimes, you know, so far behind the baseline, he's able to somehow turn that around.

You know, today was no different. He plays with great margin over the net out there. He's not going to give you those cheap errors.

Q. And how do you now switch back into grass court mode? What is your preparation like for Wimbledon?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I don't know. You know, you've just got to get on the grass. I play Queen's next week, then a week off.

Yeah, I've always been able to, you know, change pretty well. You know, I've won Queen's at least I think three times. And I've always played well there. But it's not an easy thing to do. For some reason, I've been able to adjust maybe a little bit better than some of the other people in the past.

But, yeah, until now I hadn't really, you know, started thinking about grass. You sort of hit me and I haven't even really thought about, you know, thinking about Queen's or Wimbledon at this stage.

Q. In which way the quarterfinal here can help you for Wimbledon, apart from confidence, of course? Is there anything you can learn from that two weeks to go to Wimbledon?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No, I think confidence more than anything and winning matches, winning four matches to get to the quarterfinals.

Obviously, it's a totally different surface. There's going to be probably, you know, different guys in the quarterfinals maybe, you know, at Wimbledon in a couple weeks' time. We'll have to wait and see. But, you know, it's a big change from playing on clay to grass, I think.

But, you know, obviously for me, I think I draw more confidence and, you know, feel good I guess about going into the grass because I've had a pretty good record on grass in the past.

Q. Overall, how would you assess your tournament here at the French?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I played well. You know, I felt like I was hitting the ball as well as I probably ever have during the whole French Open, the whole tournament I think more than anything. You know, I've played a couple of good matches here in the past. You know, good sets here and there.

But I think in general, my four matches got better and better as the tournament went on. You know, Verkerk and Malisse, I had to play extremely well to win those two matches. And today I just lost to a guy that was too good.

Q. After the first set, did you try to do anything differently for the next set or even the third one?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Uhm, yeah, I tried, you know, coming into the net maybe a little bit more now and then. You know, looping, you know, a few balls up, try and get him on the defense, then try and attack.

But as I said before, his defense was so good, especially today. You know, he's very good at any time, but especially today he was able to get that ball back extremely deep, so he didn't give me a lot of chances to actually attack him out there today.

He's a class player on this surface.

Q. On the line of what you were saying, the need for more clay courts in Australia, you think they could make the transition from clay to other surfaces is less difficult than other surfaces to clay?>

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I do. I know Fitzy is a big believer in it. I know there's a lot of guys, you know, former players and stuff from Australia who are strong believers in it.

But, yeah, you watch a guy like Coria, Ferrero, Nalbandian, these kind of guys move on this surface, you know, it's really a joy to watch, they move so well out there. You know, Coria probably at the moment's the best. I would say Gaudio is probably close behind him, I'd say.

I just think the game's changed in a lot of ways. There's not those serve-volleyers out there nearly as much nowadays. Even on grass, as we have seen in the last couple of years, and when I won Wimbledon, you can win from the back of the court.

I think it's easier to adjust from clay to grass rather than vice versa.

Gaga
06-02-2004, 03:02 PM
thanks for the interview !

Socket
06-02-2004, 03:06 PM
Lleyton was very gracious to Gaudio, as always, but you could tell his mind was still on the match, and he was very, very disappointed. Hope he can get his mind wrapped around the positives for next week's tournament! Lleyton, you had a great run this year, congratulations on four excellent matches!

tournesol
06-02-2004, 03:10 PM
The interview :rolleyes: He doesn't seem too disappointed, but then again he never does these days really.... :scratch: I miss stroppy Lleyts ;) The one who would barely say two words when he lost a match ;) He was funny. Now he's polite and gives them real answers!



:wavey: jess

imo we always need a postmortem after a defeat

and i totally agree, i get irritated (to remain polite) by the neutral tone and content of his interviews :rolleyes:

Princess Zelda
06-02-2004, 04:29 PM
Lleyton!:sad:

I didn't get to see the match..any one watch it?

Yasmine
06-02-2004, 04:50 PM
I am sooooo sad he lost. :sad:
I hope he does as well at Wimbly as he did last time he reached the QF of RG... (2002) :wavey:

Socket
06-02-2004, 05:55 PM
:wavey: jess

imo we always need a postmortem after a defeat

and i totally agree, i get irritated (to remain polite) by the neutral tone and content of his interviews :rolleyes:

Actually, I think he's wise to be neutral in his interviews. He got burnt more than once by something he said in an interview when he was younger, and now he knows not to give the sports "journalists" anything to use against him. It doesn't mean that he's not upset or disappointed, only that he hides it well. Personally, I think that his disappointment does show through in a few of his answers, but that may just be my interpretation.

kit
06-02-2004, 08:51 PM
Well done Lleyton, you did a great tournament!!! :worship: :worship: :worship:
Gaudio was to good today. But Lleyton played very well the last matches, so congrats. And good luck for Wimbledon!!!! I think he has good chances there. :bounce: :bounce: :bounce:

Andrew.
06-02-2004, 09:01 PM
Congrats on a great tournament Lleyton. :)

Bibi
06-02-2004, 09:38 PM
Well to be honest, I didn't think Lleyton played that bad today. (At least not the part of the match I've seen => I've taped it and saw only a small part of it, when I came home from work). He didn't play his best match ever, but it wasn't that bad either. When I heard he had lost, and then heard the score, I thought it was going to be horrible to watch (but the bit I've watched so far wasn't that bad).

I just think Gaudio was too good today, just like Lleyton admited in his post match 'interview'.

But nevertheless I think Lleyton did a hell of a job getting to the QF at RG knowing that clay is his least favourite surface to play on.
(if you only look at the 'star players' that lost earlier in the tournament).

I wish him best of luck for the next tournaments (that'll be Queens next week, no????)

Jess
06-02-2004, 10:46 PM
Actually, I think he's wise to be neutral in his interviews. He got burnt more than once by something he said in an interview when he was younger, and now he knows not to give the sports "journalists" anything to use against him. It doesn't mean that he's not upset or disappointed, only that he hides it well. Personally, I think that his disappointment does show through in a few of his answers, but that may just be my interpretation.

I understand that he has to be careful - and it's not all his fault, the media are giving him bland boring questions, as they have done all through his tournament. It would probably help if they gave him slightly more interesting questions that he could give an opinion on.

Socket
06-03-2004, 12:50 AM
I understand that he has to be careful - and it's not all his fault, the media are giving him bland boring questions, as they have done all through his tournament. It would probably help if they gave him slightly more interesting questions that he could give an opinion on.

Actually, earlier in the tournament, Lleyton did get one very interesting question, about the drug testing results, and his statements (to the effect that the ATP has messed up the testing program) were quoted in some articles I read. But the interview itself was never posted on the RG website! I guess we know why too, don't we? :eek:

Socket
06-03-2004, 12:55 AM
Well to be honest, I didn't think Lleyton played that bad today. (At least not the part of the match I've seen => I've taped it and saw only a small part of it, when I came home from work). He didn't play his best match ever, but it wasn't that bad either. When I heard he had lost, and then heard the score, I thought it was going to be horrible to watch (but the bit I've watched so far wasn't that bad).

I just think Gaudio was too good today, just like Lleyton admited in his post match 'interview'.

But nevertheless I think Lleyton did a hell of a job getting to the QF at RG knowing that clay is his least favourite surface to play on.
(if you only look at the 'star players' that lost earlier in the tournament).

I wish him best of luck for the next tournaments (that'll be Queens next week, no????)

I agree with everything you say. Gaudio was just too good on this day, and Lleyton did a GREAT job getting to the QFs on his least favorite surface, surpassing the results of Federer, Roddick, Agassi, and Ferrero. He put in the time on red clay this year, and it did pay dividends, maybe not a grand slam trophy, but an excellent result nonetheless. So, there are definitely positives for him to take away this year.

And yes, he said he's playing Queens next week. That will be something like his fifth straight week of tennis, which has to be some kind of record for him.

Lisbeth
06-03-2004, 01:16 AM
I also agree with everything Bibi said! And I have to say that even if he's disappointed, I find it hard to believe he could be more disappointed about a QF loss than about the earlier losses he's bounced back from previously! (And this year he's been playing rather than watching for the 2nd week. I totally love that he supports Kim but nevertheless the extra matches won't hurt him!)

possie
06-03-2004, 01:03 PM
The interview :rolleyes: He doesn't seem too disappointed, but then again he never does these days really.... :scratch: I miss stroppy Lleyts ;) The one who would barely say two words when he lost a match ;) He was funny. Now he's polite and gives them real answers!

Dare I say its called Growing Up ;)

tournesol
06-03-2004, 01:27 PM
Dare I say its called Growing Up ;)

you're right, it's great for him as a young adult; but not so great for his tennis because imo by getting more mature and putting things into perspective you are no longer as 'obsessed with tennis'.

i'm still a very committed fan though

possie
06-03-2004, 01:39 PM
Well, I think that from what we have seen of late there is still plently of Tennis Fire within him, which, don't get me wrong, I want to see just as much as the next Lleyton fan! But I think he has grown up and thus realised that there are some things/people more important than tennis, and put life into perspective.

I'm still a very commited fan though...perhaps even more so than before :scratch: ;)

tournesol
06-03-2004, 01:43 PM
Well, I think that from what we have seen of late there is still plently of Tennis Fire within him, which, don't get me wrong, I want to see just as much as the next Lleyton fan! But I think he has grown up and thus realised that there are some things/people more important than tennis.

I'm still a very commited fan though...perhaps even more so than before :scratch: ;)

no doubt Ll is multi-talented

Lisbeth
06-03-2004, 01:44 PM
I agree on all the above. He's definitely more mature (we can probably blame Kim as well as years!) I think Lleyton still desperately wants to win. I don't see it as a bad thing that he can smile when he loses. Actually, he's always been a good sport to the other guys but not so much to the media!!

possie
06-03-2004, 01:45 PM
no doubt Ll is multi-talented

Definitely Danni! :yippee:

No doubt his multi-talenting will only improve from here ;)

tournesol
06-03-2004, 01:47 PM
I agree on all the above. He's definitely more mature (we can probably blame Kim as well as years!) I think Lleyton still desperately wants to win. I don't see it as a bad thing that he can smile when he loses. Actually, he's always been a good sport to the other guys but not so much to the media!!

Ll younger seemed to me very direct, too direct to be appreciated except maybe by people as direct :o

possie
06-03-2004, 01:48 PM
I agree on all the above. He's definitely more mature (we can probably blame Kim as well as years!) I think Lleyton still desperately wants to win. I don't see it as a bad thing that he can smile when he loses. Actually, he's always been a good sport to the other guys but not so much to the media!!

Very true, I don't doubt he has been a good sport, but has now "mastered" shall we (bravely :p ) say, being a good sport to the media.

I'd also say that Kim's influence is far away from what she may have ever "said" but rather from just being Kim (if you know what I mean! ;) :angel: )

Lisbeth
06-03-2004, 01:52 PM
Yes, that's what I meant. He must have osmosed some of that "there's worse things in life than losing a tennis game" attitude that Kim's had right from the start.

Lleyton will be fine. Indeed, I wouldn't be surprised if he does considerably more than fine for the rest of the year. Once the immediate disappointment wears off, he'll realise he lasted a week longer than the so called stars of the game and be happy :)

possie
06-03-2004, 01:55 PM
Yes, that's what I meant. He must have osmosed some of that "there's worse things in life than losing a tennis game" attitude that Kim's had right from the start.

Or maybe it was there all the time and he just had to find that "thing" ( ;) ) that was better than tennis :angel:

Lleyton will be fine. Indeed, I wouldn't be surprised if he does considerably more than fine for the rest of the year. Once the immediate disappointment wears off, he'll realise he lasted a week longer than the so called stars of the game and be happy :)

Indeed. Wimbledon is all but two weeks away, and that pot of gold lies once again on the horizon :)

NOMAD
06-03-2004, 01:58 PM
I agree on all the above. He's definitely more mature (we can probably blame Kim as well as years!) I think Lleyton still desperately wants to win. I don't see it as a bad thing that he can smile when he loses. Actually, he's always been a good sport to the other guys but not so much to the media!!

:yeah:
I prefer to see LL smiled after a loss.

I think he still wants to win badly every time he gets on court.

He just showed it on court,not in the interview.

I like that he always give a lot credit to his opponent.

If he is dissapointed, he can talk to Kim , his friends or his family,

there's no use to say his dissappointment to the press.

Jess
06-03-2004, 04:02 PM
Dare I say its called Growing Up ;)

That's probably it ;)

Socket
06-03-2004, 04:19 PM
You know, I just went on the ATP's site, and I saw that they updated the champions race (or whatever they call it today) after the QFs. Lleyton FELL two places to No. 8. Shesh. And they still haven't corrected the extra points they gave Federer.

Lalitha
06-04-2004, 07:34 AM
ATP would act faster only if an American player is involved in it. Otherwise, it would be until Monday evening until we get to see the updates.

SomL.
06-04-2004, 10:42 AM
:angel: :angel: :p :) :D :worship: Good luck Lleyton in Queens and Wimbledon !!!!!!!! Come on Lleyton ^_^ :angel: :angel: :p ;) :D :) :worship:

kim4eva
06-04-2004, 11:47 AM
Hewitt's best asset is beyond big serves and fast forehands

By Alan Trengrove
Friday, 4 June 2004
The Canberry Times

Despite Wednesday night's loss at the French Open, Lleyton Hewitt has enhanced his reputation as the best thinker in tennis.

Cerebral excellence isn't a quality people usually associate with Hewitt. They appreciate his speed and tenacity, his never-say-die spirit, without realising that his brain, in a tennis sense, is as fertile as that of any of the great champions of the past.

In mental prowess, I place him among the top five tennis brains in Australia's history, the others being the pioneering Norman Brookes, who was noted for his cunning; the diminutive Rod Laver and Ken Rosewall, who constantly out-thought opponents; and John Newcombe, a master strategist at his peak.

Hewitt's mental attributes may be divided into two parts. First is his capacity to concentrate, to hang tough when seemingly outclassed by a player with bigger or more brilliant shots or one who strikes a purple patch. He remains remarkably cool (apart from muttering a few expletives at the back of the court), and tries to figure out how he can make life more difficult for his opponent.

An example was his third-round match against Martin Verkerk, the 2003 French Open finalist. The Dutchman is a very big man with a thunderous serve and a lightning backhand. Compared to Hewitt, though, he's a mental pygmy. Down two sets to one, and a break in the fourth, the outgunned Aussie cut down his unforced errors, shrugged off Verkerk's winners, and won the battle of nerves by dropping only three games in the last two sets.

Hewitt's second knack is his ability to read a match and adjust his tactics accordingly.

Laver once told me that what impressed him most about Hewitt was his great feeling of where he is in a match and what points are important. Such self-knowledge is normally acquired only after years of experience. Hewitt found it when fresh out of school.

"Lleyton is very mature at staying the course," said Laver. "He may go in with a plan, but he's flexible."

Against Xavier Malisse on Sunday, Hewitt knew that the Belgian was becoming frustrated and anxious. When Malisse looked like prolonging the match by winning the third-set tiebreak, Hewitt hit a succession of good-length, medium-pace shots to Malisse's backhand.

Leading 6 points to 3, Malisse lost patience, went for a few premature big shots and made costly errors.

"He's a freak," says Todd Woodbridge, acknowledging his teammate's innate sense of tactics. "People like him come along only every 15 or 20 years."

When Hewitt arrived in Paris 10 days ago, few gave him much chance of winning the title. The favourites were Roger Federer, Carlos Moya and Guillermo Coria, who had all won clay-court titles in recent weeks.

But Hewitt had learned from past mistakes, particularly his lack of adequate clay-court preparation last year. This time he had spent more than a few weeks on European clay. He felt more comfortable on clay and had faith in his ability to beat any opponent on any surface.

That's another sign of his smartness. If he never wins the French Open, it won't be because he failed to put his mind to the task.

kim4eva
06-04-2004, 11:48 AM
Hewitt turns mind to grass
Bruce Wilson
Paris
04jun04

LLEYTON Hewitt departed with dignity from one of the worst lessons of a career that once had him ranked the best player in the world.

He was polite, full of praise for the man who beat him 6-3 6-2 6-2, and undeterred. :p
In fact, he sounded like a cross between a ruminant and a pot-head. "You've just got to get on the grass," he said, which must have been the name of a 1960s song. What he meant was, he was leaving town for England.

He is going to play the genial but tough tournament at Queen's in west London that starts on Monday and which he has won three times. After that he is taking a week off to attack Wimbledon, scene of the triumph he counts above all others.

You felt Hewitt must have been seriously down after being beaten so convincingly by Gaston Gaudio, ranked 30 places below him.

Those who watched every point of that match will know what a comprehensive loss it was for Hewitt. He was totally outsmarted and outplayed by a man who knew exactly what he was doing on the red clay.

Happily, Hewitt had not the slightest hesitation in conceding that, and that was another indication that he is a more serene soul.

Perhaps more important was the way he re-emphasised how vital it was to get Australian kids on claycourts to learn how to play proper tennis.

Under his coach Roger Rasheed and the Davis Cup captain John Fitzgerald, Hewitt is quietly assuming the role of senior Australian player once held by Pat Rafter. A wall he could do without has been built around Hewitt for most of his career, and it seems to be breaking, if not exactly crumbling.

There is a way to go, but Fitzgerald, Wally Masur and Mark Woodforde in Australia's Davis Cup set-up are very happy with Hewitt and his present attitude.

As Hewitt himself said, he didn't know what they're feeding the South Americans, but it seemed to be doing the trick.

Whatever it is, it flourishes in clay. The French Open for too long has been treated as an eccentricity. It is more and more the place where those who learned basic tennis make their mark.

The thrashing he was given by Gaudio might have been seen by Hewitt as just one of those things in the old days. In fact, there was a time he might have resented being asked about it at all.

Instead, he was not only happy to talk at length but also to take up what is becoming a kind of mantra for the Australian hierarchy, that if tennis is to go anywhere in Australia, kids must play on clay and learn all the arts.

Then, said Hewitt (backed by just about everyone), they can transfer those skills much more easily on to other surfaces, especially since Wimbledon is now slowing down both the balls and the courts.

Hewitt was almost rapturous about the great array of modern claycourt players.

"A joy to watch," he said.

Speaking of Wimbledon where he won in 2002 only to be knocked out in the first round next year, Hewitt said: "I've always been able to change pretty well (from clay to grass). For some reason I've been able to adjust maybe a little bit better than some of the other people in the past."

The strength of the Argentines was written in letters of clay by Gaudio, and later by David Nalbandian whom Hewitt beat in his Wimbledon final.

Nalbandian eliminated the madcap Brazilian Gustavo Kuerten in four hard sets 6-2 3-6 6-4 7-6 (8-6).

Kuerten had about 20 chances to win it and about 21 to lose it. That match was played in front of an enraptured full house.

Hewitt-Gaudio didn't draw flies. Just how do these French crowds know?

kim4eva
06-04-2004, 11:48 AM
Still everyone's clay pigeons
June 4, 2004
Sydney Morning Herald

With the exception of Lleyton Hewitt, Australians have again failed miserably at Roland Garros. So why the aversion to red dirt? Linda Pearce reports from Paris.

Australia's Fed Cup squad, captain Evonne Goolagong Cawley and coach Mark Woodforde are sitting around a table in Moscow before the April tie against Russia when the perennial claycourt subject is raised.

Someone has heard of a plan to send the nation's best juniors for extended periods to Spain to learn their craft on the best teaching surface. The idea is supported, unanimously.

A month later, Davis Cup coach Wally Masur is commentating at Roland Garros, where he has seen a near Australian wipe-out. Of the four men and four women in the main draw, only Lleyton Hewitt and Nicole Pratt last until at least round two. Hewitt's quarter-final trouncing by Gaston Gaudio is the beacon amid the gloom and a reminder of Australia's deficiencies on the surface that has thwarted it for decades.

Notable exceptions have existed, of course, including the 1999 Davis Cup final pinched from the French on indoor clay in Nice, but the last comparable men's French Open performance was in 1982, when all but eventual quarter-finalist Peter McNamara were ousted in the first round. Hewitt is one of only four Australian men to reach the quarter-finals or better since Rod Laver's last win, in 1969, joining Phil Dent (1977), McNamara (1982) and Patrick Rafter (1997). So why is it so?

"It's pretty cut-and-dried, really: we just don't have claycourts at home, so if we have a good junior, the majority of his tennis is probably played on mod grass at club level, and then if he becomes half-decent he's probably training on Rebound Ace, and we just don't have clay," Masur said this week. "Clay teaches you how to play, because you just can't bash winners. It's like chess, a bit of self-learning."

Woodforde recalls, as a teenager, his coach Barry Phillips-Moore insisting he left behind the fast surfaces and honed his game on the Continental clay, an education lasting three years. "All he said to my parents was, 'I will teach him as best I can, but he shouldn't be going to play in the US on hardcourts. He needs to get away from Australia, get away from the fast courts, learn to play on the slow European clay'," Woodforde remembered.

"His theory behind that was Australians have been brought up on faster courts, we're always known generally as attacking players, serve-volleyers, and once it's there, it's in-bred, you don't lose that. So if you're wanting to be a great player, why would you not learn to play from the baseline?

"But I just don't see too many of the juniors coming over and playing these tournaments. They've just got to learn to stick it out on the claycourts. You've got to be willing to just haul arse on the baseline and just be willing to stay out there and hit so many groundstrokes, but not lose sight of trying to finish off at net as well, and I think you learn how to develop a winning shot on clay."

Tennis Australia is now catching on and is increasing its number of claycourts and like tournaments, while investigating more cost-efficient variations of the traditional surface to encourage councils and clubs to lay red clay.

Wayne Arthurs also spoke in Paris of the possibility of setting up elite junior camps in Spain for long periods, although Masur would prefer to see more money spent on developing the infrastructure at home. And there is, too, an injury-prevention benefit, Masur using the example of the promising Ryan Henry, sidelined for more than a year with a type of stress fracture in his knee that doesn't happen on clay.

"I think Tennis Australia are talking to clubs nearby to rip up some mod grass or whatever they've got and put down some legitimate European claycourts to use as centres during the day for our best juniors, at least, so that the bigger portion of their training's on clay. Save their bodies, too," Masur said. "It's been a long time coming, but I think it's actually about to happen."

Masur thus sees a little cause for optimism, that he may one day watch Australians playing singles for all the Paris fortnight. But for now, a multiple presence in round two will be the exception, not the rule.

"It'll be hard," he said. "It is possible that we'll produce a claycourter the likes of Guillermo Coria, but possibly not, because our culture's a little bit different and the majority of our tennis is played on other surfaces. But we do need to have kids who have a relevant game to what is going on in the world today."

As for Hewitt, he will switch to grass, having equalled his best French Open result and with his three Queen's Club and one Wimbledon title evidence of his ability to handle the change of surface from slow to fast better than most.

Yet he, like the other Australians in Paris, acknowledges the broader problem and sees part of the solution as more courts, more tournaments and greater exposure to the tormentor that is European dirt. For whatever else in the game may change, Hewitt insists, the transition from clay to other surfaces is still easier than the reverse.

"I know there's a lot of guys, former players and stuff from Australia who are strong believers in it," he said. "You watch a guy like Coria, [Juan Carlos] Ferrero, [David] Nalbandian, these kind of guys, move on this surface, it's really a joy to watch.

"I just think the game's changed in a lot of ways. There's not those serve-volleyers out there nearly as much nowadays. Even on grass, as we have seen in the last couple of years, and when I won Wimbledon, you can win from the back of the court. I think it's easier to adjust from clay to grass rather than vice versa."

Socket
06-04-2004, 02:10 PM
The ATP did correct Federer's point total (it's now 501), even though he's not an American. :p Lleyton is still at No. 8, however!!! :(

Socket
06-04-2004, 02:11 PM
Thanks for posting those articles; I especially enjoyed reading the first one. Very insightful!

Goonergal
06-04-2004, 04:31 PM
In fact, he sounded like a cross between a ruminant and a pot-head. "You've just got to get on the grass,"
:lol:

Thanks for the articles!

Bibi
06-04-2004, 09:28 PM
Thanks for the articles!!

Good luck in Queens Lleyton!!!

ally_014
06-05-2004, 06:05 AM
Thanks for those articles! :kiss: That first one is great (:yeah: for Alan Trengrove) and the 'ruminant or pothead' quote is :lol: when i read it in the paper I almost snorted into my weet-bix! :o :p