Michael Chang [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Michael Chang

ae wowww
07-05-2007, 07:35 PM
When I arrived at the courts today, I walked past the Jensens against TJ Middleton and Michael Chang - I had seen the former 3 players live before, but had never seen Michael play so watched about 3 of 4 games. He was still repping the same shoes as he used to wear, but Babolat rackets. What surprised me was the amount of slice he hits his first serve with, and in fact it seemed, not very much pace. Likewise, his second serve uses a lot of spin - but I was wondering if he has always played like this? Can anyone describe his game for me, please.

The Jensens were showboating as always, hitting leftie and rightie serves and getting pretty noisy - good for the sport. Not sure how the match ended up, but seemed to be good fun nonetheless.

Seleshfan
07-05-2007, 07:56 PM
Well from what I can remember, I think he was pretty much a counter-puncher. No big weapons, other than his speed and consistency. Towards the end of his career, I think he switched to a longer racket for more speed on his serve, and it really messed with his first serve percentage. All in all, I would call him a poor man's Hewitt.

alfonsojose
07-05-2007, 08:12 PM
Well from what I can remember, I think he was pretty much a counter-puncher. No big weapons, other than his speed and consistency. Towards the end of his caree, I think he switched to a longer racket for more speed on his serve, and it really messed with his first serve percentage. All in all, I would call him a poor man's Hewitt.
:cuckoo:

Seleshfan
07-05-2007, 08:27 PM
So, I'm assuming you disagree? Why? I honestly can't think of anything Chang did better than Hewitt....except for maybe praying and proselytizing.

thegre8w0n
07-05-2007, 08:37 PM
Its sad Chang only finished with 1 slam. I remember in 1996 he played Sampras in the US Open final and the winner was going to be number 1 and Sampras destoyed him.

Lendl's Forehand
07-05-2007, 09:16 PM
A poor man's Hewitt is going a bit far imo. Hewitt won 2 Slams and Chang won 1. (And I seriously doubt Hewitt will ever win another.) Chang was a solid No.2 in the world behind Sampras. He also reached the finals at the Aussie Open (lost to Becker) and the U.S. Open (lost to Sampras). I never liked his game or cheered for him but the guy was a hell of an accomplished player. I think b/c he faded so rapidly from '97 on he may not be remembered as accurately as he should be.

thrust
07-05-2007, 09:26 PM
Chang was an outstanding competitor, around 5ft-9in, who was an over achiever. Many tour players would have been thrilled to have Michael^s carrer stats.

Seleshfan
07-05-2007, 09:32 PM
I think the topic was supposed to be Chang's game play, not career acheivements. I will stand by my assertion that Chang is/was an inferior counter-puncher to Hewitt.

alfonsojose
07-05-2007, 10:41 PM
I think the topic was supposed to be Chang's game play, not career acheivements. I will stand by my assertion that Chang is/was an inferior counter-puncher to Hewitt.

Retriever isn't the same as counter pouncher. And surface detail is required. For example, on clay, Hewitt sucks next to Chang.

Seleshfan
07-05-2007, 10:47 PM
Retriever isn't the same as counter pouncher. And surface detail is required. For example, on clay, Hewitt sucks next to Chang.

I never called either of them a retriever? :shrug: I actually think if they played in their prime, Hewitt would take Chang out on clay, grass, hard, and indoor....

Greg-Pete fan
07-05-2007, 11:10 PM
Chang only once played a good Wimbledon. In 1994 he reached quarterfinal, but he lost to Sampras in straight sets.

Jimnik
07-05-2007, 11:45 PM
Chang had speed and retrieving skills but he was very much a slow court player with average ball striking skills. If you want to compare him to a modern player, Coria would be a much better comparison than Hewitt. He did improve his serve a little and it helped him get a few good results on the hard courts but, as expected, he burned out at quite an early age.

AceMaker
07-05-2007, 11:51 PM
http://img297.imageshack.us/img297/1014/feat1rw2.gif (http://imageshack.us)

Fapmeister
07-06-2007, 01:22 AM
Actually, Chang would be better described as a "poor man's Nadal", not Hewitt. Hewitt is a flat ball striking counter puncher while chang was a complete looping baseline grinder.

chewy
07-06-2007, 03:32 AM
http://img297.imageshack.us/img297/1014/feat1rw2.gif (http://imageshack.us)

:lol: i like this.

thegre8w0n
07-06-2007, 03:47 AM
A poor man's Hewitt is going a bit far imo. Hewitt won 2 Slams and Chang won 1. (And I seriously doubt Hewitt will ever win another.) Chang was a solid No.2 in the world behind Sampras. He also reached the finals at the Aussie Open (lost to Becker) and the U.S. Open (lost to Sampras). I never liked his game or cheered for him but the guy was a hell of an accomplished player. I think b/c he faded so rapidly from '97 on he may not be remembered as accurately as he should be.

Don't forget he lost to Muster in the 1995 French Open final. It was probably his best chance to win his second slam because he played real well the whole tourament until the final.

NYCtennisfan
07-06-2007, 04:06 AM
Interestingly, at his peak, Chang could play offensive tennis. He would try tro hit huge serves on his 1st serve (could get them over 120 which was a big deal in those days and with those racquets), but only get a small % in, often at 44%-50%. Still, defensive tennis and counter-punching were his forte. He had a great offensive lob. He used it well in a memorable night match at the USO against McEnroe. It was Chang's only victory over McEnroe. He must've lobbed him for winners 10-15 times that night.

He could take the BH early and go CC with it much the same way Hewitt does and follow to net. He had a very reliable FH CC volley and a good BH CC drop voley. When he was in his prime (1996), he would routinely put away short to medium balls on his side of the court. His inside-out FH was pretty effective especially followed by a CC FH volley.

He is listed at 5'9" but was probably closer to 5'7.5". With what he had to work with, it is an amazing amount of titles and deep runs he made at big tournaments.

chewy
07-06-2007, 04:13 AM
Interestingly, at his peak, Chang could play offensive tennis. He would try tro hit huge serves on his 1st serve (could get them over 120 which was a big deal in those days and with those racquets), but only get a small % in, often at 44%-50%. Still, defensive tennis and counter-punching were his forte. He had a great offensive lob. He used it well in a memorable night match at the USO against McEnroe. It was Chang's only victory over McEnroe. He must've lobbed him for winners 10-15 times that night.

He could take the BH early and go CC with it much the same way Hewitt does and follow to net. He had a very reliable FH CC volley and a good BH CC drop voley. When he was in his prime (1996), he would routinely put away short to medium balls on his side of the court. His inside-out FH was pretty effective especially followed by a CC FH volley.

He is listed at 5'9" but was probably closer to 5'7.5". With what he had to work with, it is an amazing amount of titles and deep runs he made at big tournaments.

i gotta find some of his old matches when he was in his prime. thz for giving your account of chang's matches.

:eek: 5'7.5"!? not much taller than o. rochus!

NYCtennisfan
07-06-2007, 04:18 AM
i gotta find some of his old matches when he was in his prime. thz for giving your account of chang's matches.

:eek: 5'7.5"!? not much taller than o. rochus!

You're welcome. :)

I don't think he was taller than 5'8" maximum but probably closer to 5'7.5". My little brother and I met him at the Open several times and we both are 6'1" so there was quite a bit of height difference. Really nice guy though as was his brother/coach/doubles partner Carl.

He was at a huge disadvantage returning serve and of course trying to serve big at low %'s.

Lee
07-06-2007, 04:19 AM
Isn't his coach/brother called Carl?

NYCtennisfan
07-06-2007, 04:22 AM
Isn't his coach/brother called Carl?

Sorry, Carl Chang. I don't know where I got Albert....?:confused:

Lee
07-06-2007, 04:23 AM
There's another Asian tennis player called Albert Chang but he's Canadian.

NYCtennisfan
07-06-2007, 04:28 AM
There's another Asian tennis player called Albert Chang but he's Canadian.

Maybe that's where...

Bobby
07-06-2007, 06:11 AM
Chang had speed and retrieving skills but he was very much a slow court player with average ball striking skills. If you want to compare him to a modern player, Coria would be a much better comparison than Hewitt. He did improve his serve a little and it helped him get a few good results on the hard courts but, as expected, he burned out at quite an early age.


First of all, I don't think Chang burned out. The game developed to a direction where Chang didn't really have a shot anymore. And Chang didn't have average ball striking skills. He had excellent skills. You can never win the French Open and reach the top 5 with average skills.

bayvalle
07-06-2007, 07:28 AM
First of all, I don't think Chang burned out. The game developed to a direction where Chang didn't really have a shot anymore. And Chang didn't have average ball striking skills. He had excellent skills. You can never win the French Open and reach the top 5 with average skills.
Michael Chang reminds me a great player who, during his time, chose to carry the U.S. flag. I am wondering, what if another great player, e.g. JesusFed, suddenly decided to change current country allegiance and play for another country, e.g., U.S. This would be something the Americans would be proud to see, I suppose.

Haile Selassie
07-06-2007, 12:28 PM
Michael :sobbing:

Now he is coaching Shuia Peng

Kolya
07-06-2007, 12:37 PM
Don't forget he lost to Muster in the 1995 French Open final. It was probably his best chance to win his second slam because he played real well the whole tourament until the final.

Muster was never going to lose the 1995 FO.

Chang is not a "Poor man of anyone". He should be respected on his own.