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pistol pete in boston

pj80
05-02-2007, 11:55 PM
Sampras back on court in seniors tour
By JIMMY GOLEN
AP Sports Writer

Michael Dwyer / AP Photo
Pete Sampras speaks during a news conference in Boston, Wednesday, May 2, 2007. Sampras and other tennis champions including John McEnroe, Jim Courier and Mats Wilander will compete in Champions Cup Boston as part of the 2007 Outback Champions Series from Thursday through Saturday at the Agganis arena in Boston.
BOSTON -- Pete Sampras took some time away from changing his kids' diapers this winter to make a playdate of his own. The soon-to-be Hall of Famer, who retired from competitive tennis in 2002, hung out with Roger Federer when the current world No. 1 was in California to play at Indian Wells. On the first day, they had a friendly workout hitting balls back and forth for about three hours.

"The next day," Sampras said, "he came to my house and we stepped it up a little bit. Two great players, playing on a practice court; just two guys going toe-to-toe.

"It was competitive. I held my own. For me, at my stage, I felt pretty happy about that."

What's encouraging for Sampras should be discouraging for the rest of the field at the Champions Cup stop in Boston this weekend. Jim Courier, a four-time Grand Slam winner who organizes the senior tour, said Sampras is still a great player despite the layoff.

"I can assure you that his game is more than ready to take on the competition here. This week, we're up against it," Courier said before the tour began play at Boston University's Agganis Arena on Wednesday. "If Wimbledon was best-of-three, Pete Sampras would be the No. 2 seed right now."

The 35-year-old Sampras will play in the five-day round-robin along with fellow Grand Slam winners Courier, John McEnroe, Courier, Pat Cash, Petr Korda and Mats Wilander. Todd Martin, who won the event in Boston last year, is also in the field, along with Wayne Ferreira, who played in a record 56 Grand Slam events.

"This year's field is deeper, stronger than any field we have had so far," Courier said. "Adding Pete to the mix ... with the records he holds and the prestige he brings, is unquestioned. It will all be great, until we play."

Sampras was ranked No. 1 for a record 286 weeks while winning seven Wimbledon titles, five at the U.S. Open and two at the Australian Open. Sampras, who will be inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in July, retired after beating Andre Agassi in the 2002 U.S. Open final for a record 14th Grand Slam title.

"I shut it down for about three years," he said Wednesday. "I didn't watch any tennis, didn't pick up a racket."

Instead, Sampras played a lot of golf and helped take care of his two children, now 4 1/2 and 1 1/2. Bored and a little restless and still in contact with Courier, he decided to give the over-30 tour a try.

"I love my kids," he said. "But if you ask me if I'd rather play Jim or change some diapers, I'll play Jim."

Sampras opens Thursday night against Korda, then plays Wilander on Friday and McEnroe on Saturday night. The top players after the round-robin advance to the championship and consolation matches.

Top prize in the $142,000 purse is $50,000 for an undefeated champion. The players also earn points during the six Outback Champions Series events toward a year-end title.

Mimi
05-03-2007, 03:39 AM
thanks pj80 for the article, well, Bridgette should help pete a bit for changing the diapers :mad: :p

Greg-Pete fan
05-03-2007, 07:32 AM
So the first Pete`s opponent - Petr Korda

Their H2H

12-5 SAMPRAS

http://www.atptennis.com/3/en/players/headtohead/?player1=Sampras%2C+Pete&player2=Korda%2C+Petr

Mimi
05-03-2007, 08:51 AM
Petr Korda :mad: , pete should have won their match in 1997 us open and won one more slam :mad:
So the first Pete`s opponent - Petr Korda

Their H2H

12-5 SAMPRAS

http://www.atptennis.com/3/en/players/headtohead/?player1=Sampras%2C+Pete&player2=Korda%2C+Petr

the_natural
05-03-2007, 10:23 AM
Petr Korda :mad: , pete should have won their match in 1997 us open and won one more slam :mad:

It would have been 3 in one year!!!!!!!! and 11 slams, woulda taken alotta pressure off pete for the following year too, and if he could get 3 outa four in a year it might have put it into perspective that he Should focus on the french but when there are great hard court players as well as great grass court players you cant just practice ur clay court game straight after Aussie open (like last year before IW and Miami)

angiel
05-03-2007, 04:38 PM
Sampras returns to court tonight in Champions event at BU

By Mick Colageo
Standard-Times staff writer
May 03, 2007 6:00 AM

BOSTON — It's a shame for tennis that Roger Federer and Pete Sampras only played once.

In 2001, Federer's five-set, round-of-16 triumph at Wimbledon was noted more as the sign of a legend's decline than the rise of a young star. Not yet 20, but 10 years Sampras' junior almost to the day,

Federer lost his quarterfinal to Tim Henman and was still a couple of years away from becoming the game's dominant player, a household name and someone who could count Tiger Woods among his fans.



"When he beat me in that match, I knew he was going to be a great player," said Sampras, who experienced parallel success at the same age a decade earlier. "Something clicked in him and he just became a lot more consistent."

Now five years into his retirement and scheduled for induction into the Tennis Hall of Fame on July 14 in Newport, R.I., the 35-year-old Sampras has experienced a new click in his old competitive nature.

In his first official competitive match since his 2002 retirement, Sampras will face 1996 Australian Open champion Petr Korda tonight in the Champions Cup Boston, an eight-player senior event that began Wednesday night at Boston University's Agganis Arena.

"Pete's got a new racquet, a little more hitting area, and he's hitting his backhand better than I've ever seen him hit it," said Outback Champions Series spokesman and player Jim Courier, noting that Sampras recently defeated Mardy Fish, the 31st ranked player in the world, in an exhibition.

The event also includes John McEnroe, Mats Wilander, Pat Cash, Todd Martin and Wayne Ferreira. They'll continue the round-robin format through Saturday with third-place and championship matches Sunday.

Five years removed from the grind and stress of full-time tennis, Sampras needed incentive, and it came from Federer, who sent Sampras a text message when passing through Los Angeles for the Indian Wells stop on the ATP tour.

"We hit one day for about three hours, just did a bunch of drills, and after that we talked for about an hour," said Sampras, who only recently established a friendship with his successor as the world's best player.

The next day they hit again on Sampras' court at his house and actually played. Sampras didn't divulge the scores but came away from the experience recharged.

"I was happy I can still hold my own, and holding serve is still something I can do pretty well, even against the best guy in the world," said Sampras. "It was funny — just two great players playing on a private court, just no B.S., no extracurricular fans or media, just two guys going toe to toe a little bit."

The two pulled the scene right out of Rocky III, where Balboa and Apollo Creed square off in the gym for rivalry's sake and without a single witness.

"It was fun. I actually prepared a little bit for a few days before, I stretched a bit and warmed up," said Sampras. "I knew we were going to go pretty hard so I was preparing myself for the practice."

That Sampras could stay with Federer didn't surprise Courier, a four-time major winner and contemporary of Sampras and Andre Agassi.

"The difference between us and the guys on the tour is the grind of playing 50 weeks a year," said Courier. "The human body isn't meant to take that kind of punishment."

Now that Sampras' candle is flickering again, speculation has already begun about a potential comeback, if not onto the main tour, to Wimbledon. But Sampras isn't even thinking on those levels, at least yet.

"We're not strung as tight as we used to be. When we lose a match, we'll be disappointed, but you lose a match back in my prime, you couldn't talk to me for three days," he said. "It's a different sort of gear. You want to be competitive. I still feel I can be competitive and put on a good show for the people."

Married to actress Bridget Wilson, Sampras has two children, ages 4˝ and 1˝.

"Tennis is a tricky sport to retire," he said. "You can't be a general manager when you're done playing or do golf-course design. We owe a lot to Jim for getting this (tour) together.

"It's nowhere near the tension it was in the 90s. We're all here to play serious. I love my kids, but I'd rather play Jim (Courier) than spend my time changing diapers."

Contact Mick Colageo at

mcolageo@s-t.com

angiel
05-03-2007, 04:46 PM
Sampras back on court in seniors tour

By Jimmy Golen
The Associated Press

BOSTON -- Pete Sampras took some time away from changing his kids' diapers this winter to make a playdate of his own.

The soon-to-be Hall of Famer, who retired from competitive tennis in 2002, hung out with Roger Federer when the current world No. 1 was in California to play at Indian Wells. On the first day, they had a friendly workout hitting balls back and forth for about three hours.



"The next day," Sampras said, "he came to my house and we stepped it up a little bit. Two great players, playing on a practice court; just two guys going toe-to-toe.

"It was competitive. I held my own. For me, at my stage, I felt pretty happy about that."

What's encouraging for the Palos Verdes-bred Sampras should be discouraging for the rest of the field at the Champions Cup stop in Boston this weekend. Jim Courier, a four-time Grand Slam winner who organizes the senior tour, said Sampras is still a great player despite the layoff.

"I can assure you that his game is more than ready to take on the competition here. This week, we're up against it," Courier said before the tour began play at Boston University's Agganis Arena on Wednesday. "If Wimbledon was best-of-three, Pete Sampras would be the No. 2 seed right now."

The 35-year-old Sampras will play in the five-day round-robin along with fellow Grand Slam winners Courier, John McEnroe, Pat Cash, Petr Korda and Mats Wilander. Todd Martin, who won the event in Boston last year, is also in the field, along with Wayne Ferreira, who played in a record 56 Grand Slam events.

"This year's field is deeper, stronger than any field we have had so far," Courier said. "Adding Pete to the mix ... with the records he holds and the prestige he brings, is unquestioned. It will all be great, until we play."

Sampras was ranked No. 1 for a record 286 weeks while winning seven Wimbledon titles, five at the U.S. Open and two at the Australian Open. Sampras, who will be inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in July, retired after beating Andre Agassi in the 2002 U.S. Open final for a record 14th Grand Slam title.

"I shut it down for about three years," he said Wednesday. "I didn't watch any tennis, didn't pick up a racket."

Instead, Sampras played a lot of golf and helped take care of his two children, now 4˝ and 1˝. Bored and a little restless and still in contact with Courier, he decided to give the over-30 tour a try.

"I love my kids," he said. "But if you ask me if I'd rather play Jim or change some diapers, I'll play Jim."

Sampras opens tonight against Korda, then plays Wilander on Friday and McEnroe on Saturday night. The top players after the round-robin advance to the championship and consolation matches.

Top prize in the $142,000 purse is $50,000 for an undefeated champion. The players also earn points during the six Outback Champions Series events toward a year-end title.

angiel
05-03-2007, 04:51 PM
The Boston Globe.

Sampras back in the running

He'll try to enhance his legend this week

By Bud Collins, Globe Correspondent | May 2, 2007

Pete Sampras is back in the ballgame. Not quite the same game he departed spectacularly, uniquely, five years ago by beating Andre Agassi for the US Open title, his 14th singles major. No great tennis champion had ever bade farewell on such an Everestian note. Firing the last aces, nailing the concluding volleys -- all with effortless smoothness -- Silky Sampras waved goodbye at Flushing Meadow, and that was it.

However, here he is again, in The Bean, of all places, giving us a post-retreat treat, hoping to show us how he did it amid a gang of almost-elder toughs resurrected by promoter-player Jim Courier. It's not a comeback, says Sampras, 36, over the phone from his Beverly Hills home, eager to mix it up once more as Courier's $142,000 Champions Cup Boston, an eight-man ensemble, sets up shop at Boston University's Agganis Arena tonight through Sunday. Isn't it fitting that Greek-blooded Pete should rev up again in the playpen named for the Golden Greek, Harry Agganis?

Call it a reappearance, a "next chapter," he says. Perhaps a revival meeting as he gives us that old-fashioned religion of serve-and-volley. The names are familiar, all holders of majors: Petr Korda, Mats Wilander, and John McEnroe (the 2006 runner-up to Todd Martin) are lined up to oppose Sampras in the round-robin stage. On the other side of the draw are Courier, Martin, Pat Cash, and Wayne Ferreira, victor in the tour's opener at Naples, Fla.

Courier, founding father of the limited tour backed by Outback eateries (seven tournaments), wooed Pete gently, saying, "We want you, but whenever you feel you want to play."

After all, how much golf can satisfy a 4-handicap multimillionaire who was used to running to his tennis titles?

"I was getting restless," says Sampras. "I thought this would be good for me to get fit and focused. I was up around 200, but now I'm down to my playing weight, 185. I've worked hard because I have pride in playing well. I'm curious to see how I can compete with these guys."

One of his sparring partners has been none other than a Swiss named Roger Federer.

"Roger called me when he was on the way to Indian Wells and asked if he could stop by," says Sampras. "I didn't really know him. But I found he's a great guy. Very pleasant. We played on my court, and I'd say I held my own. But Roger has an extra gear, and that makes him so great."

Federer, of course, is stalking Sampras as Pete did Aussie Roy Emerson in the major titles derby. Having eclipsed Emerson at 13 with his seventh Wimbledon prize in 2000, Sampras says, "Roger will pass me. No doubt. He's got 10 now, and I think he'll have 18, like Jack Nicklaus.

"I think I can be competitive with these guys after my layoff. Is that reality or my ego talking? I'm using a newer Wilson racket, a little bigger, the one Roger uses. The new Luxilon strings -- I mix them with gut -- are a miracle. I wish I'd had them when I was trying to win the French. I'm not as quick, but I'm hitting the ball great."

As much as he admires Federer, Sampras feels that his own road to No. 1 and staying there was bumpier. Rafael Nadal appears to be Federer's lone obstacle. Sampras was battling Agassi, Courier, Martin, Korda, Michael Chang, Stefan Edberg, Boris Becker, Yevgeny Kafelnikov, Richard Krajicek, Pat Rafter, Goran Ivanisevic, and Michael Stich in their primes as well as aging Ivan Lendl and McEnroe.

"There are more good players today, but not so many guys winning majors that I faced."

Sampras says, "I'm not a look-back guy. But I am kind of reflective about my career now that I'm going into the Hall of Fame at Newport [July 14]. It's a great honor. I'll have my parents, my whole family there."

After spending most of his life as an itinerant, Pete was glad to be at home "watching my two kids growing up.

"I still have great hands," he laughs. "You should see me doing diapers."

Champions Cup Boston
at Agganis Arena

Tonight
7 p.m. -- Todd Martin vs. Pat Cash; Jim Courier vs. Wayne Ferreira.

Tomorrow
7 p.m. -- John McEnroe vs. Mats Wilander; Pete Sampras vs. Petr Korda.

Friday
2:30 p.m. --Martin vs. Ferreira; Courier vs. Cash.

7:30 p.m. -- Sampras vs. Wilander; McEnroe vs. Korda.

Saturday
2:30 p.m. -- Wilander vs. Korda; Courier vs. Martin.
7:30 p.m. -- Cash vs. Ferreira; Sampras vs. McEnroe.

Sunday
2:30 p.m. -- Third-place match; championship match.

© Copyright 2007 Globe Newspaper Company.

angiel
05-03-2007, 04:55 PM
Sampras set to hold court
By Mark Murphy
Boston Herald Sports Reporter

Wednesday, May 2, 2007


Pete Sampras hasn’t gone to seed on a golf course, though there was a three-year, post-tennis stretch in which the big hitter guiltlessly focused on lowering his handicap.

Sampras has played in the odd tennis exhibition since retiring following his 2002 U.S. Open triumph. He has even dabbled in World Team Tennis. The experiences were enjoyable, but poor substitutes for the real thing.

As the most dominant player in the history of tennis discovered, nothing can replace the intensity that is stoked by prize money.

As such, local tennis fans are about to witness the return of a giant to the competitive stage. Sampras will make his first appearance in a money tournament since ’02 when he plays tomorrow against Petr Korda in the second round of the Champions Cup Boston at Boston University’s Agganis Arena.



“The stakes are higher when you’re playing against the greats, and I think it brings out more intensity and focus,” Sampras said. “I think this is going to be fun for the fans to watch. I think we all have a lot of pride in playing well. If the fans have a good time, then I think the players will.

“It’s not the U.S. Open, but this tournament can still have that same kind of intensity. It’s my first one, so I’m looking forward to finding out.”

The $142,000 round-robin event also includes former greats John McEnroe, Mats Wilander and Jim Courier in the eight-man field. The winner could pocket as much as $50,000 if he makes it through the four-match gauntlet undefeated.

For someone who has won the most Grand Slam championships (14) in the history of men’s professional tennis, including seven Wimbledon titles and another five U.S. Open crowns, the five-day tournament may seem like a pleasant volley. But consider what is likely to erupt Saturday night, when Sampras exchanges stares across the net with McEnroe.

“John always brings a lot to the table, not only with his game but also his personality,” Sampras said. “I don’t know what mood he’s going to be in. Sometimes it’s hard to tell. I hope he comes in with respect for the game. But when I think of him, I think of when I was a little kid watching him in the Wimbledon finals.”

Today’s players watched Sampras during his phenomenal run in the 1990s, when he held the year-ending No. 1 ranking for a record six straight years (1993-98). He earned more prize money ($43,280,489) than any other player in the history of the ATP Tour.

In the minds of many - if not Sampras’ - a return to the tour isn’t such a stretch.

“It’s crossed my mind, more out of curiosity than anything,” he said. “I’m curious of how I would do against the guys who are out there now. . . . I don’t have it in my belly any more. But whenever Wimbledon or the U.S. Open comes on I miss it.”

Now, though, Sampras can appreciate what his heirs are bringing to the court, especially new force Roger Federer.

“I think he’s head and shoulders above everyone, just a very smooth player,” Sampras said. “The great ones make it look easy, and that was one thing I took pride in doing. I don’t see anyone slowing him down. He should become the player of his generation.”

In other words, the new Sampras.

“Yeah, but more dominant,” Sampras said with a laugh.

angiel
05-03-2007, 05:07 PM
More sports

Volleying with Sampras

Pete Sampras has been enjoying life out of the spotlight since leaving tennis in 2002 as one of the best men's players in history.

By DAVE SCHEIBER
Published May 3, 2007


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------




Pete Sampras has been enjoying life out of the spotlight since leaving tennis in 2002 as one of the best men's players in history. The perennial No. 1-ranked star - six straight years - and winner of a record 14 Grand Slam events has been enjoying retirement and raising his young family with wife Bridgette Wilson-Sampras in Los Angeles. We caught up with Sampras, 35, last week at Jim Courier's Mercedes-Benz Classic charity event at the St. Pete Times Forum, where he talked about a range of topics - including this generation's most dominant male player, Roger Federer, as he seeks an elusive French Open triumph next month in Paris.

What ways do you stay active these days?

I have two little boys - Christian, who's 4 1/2, and Ryan, 1 1/2 - so they keep me busy. I've been playing golf, and I've been playing a little bit more tennis. I play a once-a-week home poker game - a little Texas hold 'em. I play basketball twice a week. So I've been trying to keep busy, stay in shape, have some fun, spend some time with my kids and my wife.

Have you enjoyed playing tennis again?

Actually, playing tennis has been good for me, because I didn't play for about three years. I took some time off and actually got a little restless and maybe a touch bored. I believe every man needs to work. And I went from this crazy life of working a lot to not doing anything at all and it was fun at first. But after a while, it wears pretty thin. So I'm going to play a few events - (Tampa), Boston and one more in Charlotte. It gives me something to prepare for and focus on. I'll be playing on the Outback Champions Series (seniors). Competitively, it's not anything like it used to be as far as intensity, but we all have a lot of pride. And we all want to win and play well.

What impresses you about today's men's game?

Two things. Roger Federer's dominance and how great he is. Just the way he handles himself on and off the court is a real credit to all sports. The other thing is I think there are less great players today, but there are a lot more good players. After Federer and (Rafael) Nadal, you look at kind of three through eight -- they're really, really good players but they're not major championship winners, like (Boris) Becker and (Stefan) Edberg, or (Jim) Courier and (Andre) Agassi. Still, the guy ranked No. 50 today is probably better than the guy ranked No. 50 when I was playing.

Anything else about Federer?

He's dominated the game probably more than anybody in the history of the game. It's just amazing how consistent he's been. I think Nadal on clay is kind of his biggest challenge now. Maybe one day he can meet that challenge and beat him.

Agassi recently said Federer needs to win the French Open to complete his resume.

When you've achieved so much - and I fell into that a little bit winning Wimbledons and the U.S. Open and Australia - it's okay, what's next? For the last couple of years of my career, it was, 'Why haven't you won the French?' It's happening to Roger now. And as he gets older and guys get a little better, it does become a little tougher. He grew up playing on clay and he's gotten to the (French Open final). I think he can win it - things really need to fall into place.

What about your generation of tennis?

I was part of an American generation that might have been the best generation ever to play the game, for sure the best American generation. Jim, myself, Andre, Michael (Chang), we combined to win more than 20 majors, we all hit or got close to No. 1 - Michael was a match from doing it. Not only that, but consider the generation of guys we competed against: Edberg, Becker, Ivan Lendl for a little bit. These were truly legends of the sport. Those mid '90s, when I played Andre in the finals of a few majors, it transcended the sport. People who didn't watch tennis were into it when I played in the finals of Wimbledon, or the U.S. Open, and had great matches with Jim. We developed a rivalry. We always had one another to be compared to, but also to push. All of us fed off one another.

Would Federer have held up well in it?

Oh yeah. He would have done just fine. I think he would have more challenges, with guys coming in a little bit more and attacking more. But I think great players figure it out. If he had played in my generation, he would have been right up there.

[Last modified May 2, 2007, 23:07:09]

angiel
05-03-2007, 05:11 PM
Pete Sampras' return to tournament tennis to be televised this week


New England Sports Network (NESN) will be the host broadcaster for the event and will show 17.5 hours of live and taped coverage started Thursday, May 3. Sportsnet New York (SNY) will broadcast 14.5 hours of taped coverage starting Friday, May 4, while Altitude will broadcast 17 hours of live coverage of the event to audiences in Colorado. Comcast Maryland will also broadcast 17 hours of taped and live coverage to audiences in the Maryland/Washington, D.C. area starting May 3.

For all broadcast times, please log on to www.ChampionsSeriesTennis.com and go to the “On The Air” section.

2007 Champions Cup Boston Schedule of Play:

Wednesday, May 2 Thursday, May 3
Night Session Night Session
Beginning at 7 p.m. Beginning at 7 p.m.
Todd Martin vs. Pat Cash John McEnroe vs. Mats Wilander
Followed by Followed by
Jim Courier vs. Wayne Ferreira Pete Sampras vs. Petr Korda

Friday, May 4
Day Session Night Session
Beginning at 2:30 p.m. Beginning at 7:30 p.m.
Todd Martin vs. Wayne Ferreira Pete Sampras vs. Mats Wilander
Followed by Followed by
Jim Courier vs. Pat Cash John McEnroe vs. Petr Korda

Saturday, May 5
Day Session Night Session
Beginning at 2:30 p.m. Beginning at 7:30 p.m.
Mats Wilander vs. Petr Korda Pat Cash vs. Wayne Ferreira
Followed by Followed by
Jim Courier vs. Todd Martin Pete Sampras vs. John McEnroe

Sunday, May 6
Day Session
Beginning at 2:30 p.m.
Third Place Match
Followed by
Championship Match

Each event features $142,000 in prize money with an undefeated winner taking home $50,000 as well as ranking points that will determine a year-end champion.

angiel
05-03-2007, 05:29 PM
Senior-itis: Sampras, Mac, Courier set to wow Boston
Summer of 1980 book will cut into writer's schedule

By Matthew Cronin, TennisReporters.net



None of the tournaments on the ATP and WTA board this week have really wet my whistle, so it's a good time to hop on a plane and head to Boston, where for the first time, I'll get a good look at Jim Courier's group of high-level senior males, namely the Champions Tour, who are stopping at Boston University's Agannis Arena May 2-6.

It should be a terrific tournament, with Pete Sampras coming on board to join Courier, John McEnroe, Mats Wilander, Pat Cash, Todd Martin, Petr Korda and Wayne Ferreira. Ticket sales are said to be going briskly, which is a good sign in a nation that has been spotty about supporting senior tennis. But there are a lot of personalities on board and while the ball-striking might not be up to Federer-Nadal standards, it's certainly good enough for most of the tennis watching populace, especially in cities like Boston, which is sadly lacking a pro tournament.

I mention this jaunt because this trip will signal a bit of change on this web site. I have about a year to finish a book on McEnroe and Bjorn Borg's "Summer of 1980" and, as a result, I'll be visiting the senior circuits more and will be doing a little less writing from the regular tour events. Yes, I'll be at all the Slams again, and yes, at most of my California standard tournaments, but the large day-in, day-out blogs won't be as frequent. I'll try to make sure to buttress the site with some tales from the former greats and include their insights on today's game, but there are only so many hours in a day and as much as I've tried to create new ones this year for TennisReporters.net, I simply cannot find any. So wherever I am, I'll be emphasizing quality over quantity. Hopefully, that will mean more interesting pieces, but it will also mean that there will be days when someone else will have to pick up the writing slack.

I haven't talked about the project much, but I will let those of you who weren't weaned on McBrat vs. The Ice Man in on a little secret; there's still a tremendous amount of interest in the subject, perhaps more than in any other in the sport outside of the life and times of Andre Agassi, and maybe a thorough breakdown of Sampras' career, which is in the competent hands of Pete Bodo.

I can think of at least five other books that are worth writing on the sport, including one on The Fab 4 as a whole – Agassi, Sampras, Courier and Michael Chang – but tennis books in general have proven to be a tough sell and numerous publishers shy away from them. Fortunately for me, the venerable publisher Wiley & Sons (which is celebrating its 200th year of publishing) believes that there are thousands of folks out there who cannot get enough of men's tennis' greatest rivalry and will sweep the book off the shelves – provided that the author can make that stirring summer somewhat coherent and intriguing to people of all ages. I'm pretty sure that if I begin the book discussing my August 1980 romp through the zany Spanish island of Ibiza that I'll draw in enough readers - as long as I include every tantalizing detail. I swear I must have seen Bjorn and his former wife Mariana Simionescu in a hazy disco there one night, or was that just some other Nordic God and his fetching Romanian bride. What I do clearly recall is that the disco that was attached to my hotel never stopped playing Abba, which defines Sweden to outsiders as much as … Borg.

The book will also touch on 1980s culture. Mac and I grew up about one hour away from each other and I have some strong memories of what life was like in the greater New York area at the time. Sweden is another case altogether. I've never had the pleasure of visiting there, but fortunately for me, the US and Sweden will face off in the Davis Cup semis, so it looks like I'll be getting a taste of King Gustav's tennis culture in mid-September.



© TennisReporters.net 2007

Mimi
05-04-2007, 03:08 AM
yeah, he should win 3 to make it a perfect figure: 15 :mad: :mad:


It would have been 3 in one year!!!!!!!! and 11 slams, woulda taken alotta pressure off pete for the following year too, and if he could get 3 outa four in a year it might have put it into perspective that he Should focus on the french but when there are great hard court players as well as great grass court players you cant just practice ur clay court game straight after Aussie open (like last year before IW and Miami)

angiel
05-04-2007, 06:38 PM
yeah, he should win 3 to make it a perfect figure: 15 :mad: :mad:


Who should win in three???:p :p :rolleyes: :confused:

angiel
05-05-2007, 04:34 PM
Boston: Sampras to play McEnroe for group championship


BOSTON — Saturday’s highly anticipated match between Pete Sampras and John McEnroe at Champions Cup Boston will now have added significance.



Sampras and McEnroe each won their second-round matches on Friday to improve to 2-0 in Group A play at Champions Cup Boston, the second tournament of the 2007 Outback Champions Series.



The two legends will play in the late match Saturday night for a berth in Sunday’s final.



“I’m expecting an entertaining match,” Sampras said. “I’ve always matched up pretty well against John. It will be fun and competitive. We both want to play well and also put on a good show.”



Winner of a record 14 Grand Slams, Sampras lost the first game of both sets but used his powerful serve to recover nicely. He had five aces and didn’t lose a game he served.



“He’s just unbelievable,” Mayotte said. “Everything’s in hyper speed for me and everything for him looks like it’s in slow motion. It’s a whole different category.”



McEnroe had a harder time holding up his end of the bargain, escaping with a 6-7 (5), 7-5, 10-2 (match tiebreak) win over Petr Korda.



McEnroe, a seven-time Grand Slam winner, squandered a 4-2 lead in dropping the first set. He then led 5-2 in the second set, but allowed Korda to tie it at 5 games apiece before winning the last two games to force a tiebreaker.



In the tiebreaker, McEnroe never trailed and coasted to an eight-point win.



“I figured out a way to win,” McEnroe said. “I shouldn’t have put myself in that position, but at least I was able to pull it out.”



In Group B play, Todd Martin took a step closer to defending his Champions Cup Boston title with a 6-3, 6-2 win over Wayne Ferreira to improve to 2-0.



Ferreira hung tough in both sets, but was eventually worn down by Martin’s aggressive play.



“I was able to persevere by winning some of the longer games early on,” Martin said. “To me, that was the difference.”



Martin will play Jim Courier on Saturday for a berth in Sunday’s final. Courier, co-founder of the Outback Champions Series, also improved to 2-0 in round-robin play with a 7-6 (3), 6-3 win over Pat Cash.



Courier and Cash each held serve throughout the first set until Courier finally broke through in the tiebreaker.



“It made an adjustment in the tiebreak,” Courier said. “I was able to get a couple of good returns, and keep him back off the baseline. Once I was in control of the baseline volleys, I felt pretty comfortable.”



Courier will face Martin for a berth in the title for the second straight year. Last year, Martin won in a third-set tiebreaker en route to beating McEnroe for the inaugural championship.



Champions Cup Boston, like all Outback Champion Series events, features an eight-man round-robin format with the winner of each four-player division meeting in the title match on Sunday.



All Outback Champions Series events feature eight-man round-robin match formats with the winner of each four-player division meeting in the title match while second-place finishers in each division play in the third-place match. Each event features $142,000 in prize money with an undefeated winner taking home $50,000 as well as Outback Champions Series ranking points that will determine a year-end champion.



To be eligible to compete in the Outback Champions Series, players must have reached at least a Grand Slam singles final, been ranked in the top five in the world or played singles on a championship Davis Cup team.





Schedule for Saturday, May 5

Afternoon Session, Beginning at 2:30 pm

Round Robin Group A
Petr Korda vs. Tim Mayotte

Followed by
Round Robin Group B
Jim Courier vs. Todd Martin



Evening Session Beginning at 7:30pm

Round Robin Group B

Pat Cash vs. Wayne Ferreria

Followed by

Round Robin Group A

Pete Sampras vs. John McEnroe

angiel
05-05-2007, 04:37 PM
TennisX News.

May 5th, 2007

Sampras v McEnroe Tonight On Court, Not on TV

by Richard Vach
Television drives professional sports, so you have to wonder, how high could tennis’ popularity rise if the powers that be could get tennis’ biggest events on TV? And we’re not talking about Wimbledon here.
This week Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal played an exhibition on a court that was half clay, half grass. Rafa won. Not on TV.
Tonight at the Outback Champion Seires event in Boston, where Pete Sampras is making his senior tour debut, the 14-time Slam winner faces John McEnroe. Will Johnny Mac try to get in Pete’s face, throw a couple tirades to get him off his game, maybe grab a random child out of the crowd to berate? Again, not on TV.





You’d think the fix was in at the Boston event as all four Americans won Friday, with Sampras pounding Tim Mayotte 6-2, 6-1; McEnroe edging Petr Korda (who Sampras had easily beaten earlier in the week) 10-2 in a match tiebreak; Todd Martin easing past Wayne Ferreira 6-3, 6-2, and Jim Courier moving past Pat Cash 7-6(3), 6-3.
Now all four Americans are 2-0 in round robin play have guaranteed themselves spots in either the Sunday championship or the third-place playoff.
“I’m expecting an entertaining match,” said Sampras, who by “entertaining” really means “easy,” as the American has been thumping his serve and volleying crisply all week, and beat McEnroe in all three of their meetings during their ATP days. “I’ve always matched up pretty well against John. It will be fun and competitive. We both want to play well and also put on a good show.”
Mayotte, the latest victim of Sampras’ hammering game, found himself levels below the competition in his first senior tour appearance, a late replacement for Mats Wilander who withdrew from the event due to a back injury.
“He’s just unbelievable,” Mayotte said of Sampras. “Everything’s in hyper speed for me and everything for him looks like it’s in slow motion. It’s a whole different category.”
McEnroe could not hold a lead against Korda, blowing early breaks in both the first and second sets, not a good look coming into the match against Sampras where it should be a race to the net, unless Sampras feels like toying some from the baseline.
“I figured out a way to win,” McEnroe said of edging Korda. “I shouldn’t have put myself in that position, but at least I was able to pull it out.”
Martin will also face Courier on Saturday for a berth in Sunday’s final, with the winner facing the Sampras-McEnroe victor.
Sampras vs. McEnroe will likely be great theater, as was the Fed vs. Rafa exo. Unlike golf which has the pull to get a slot somewhere on TV at a moment’s notice to show Tiger Woods mowing his lawn, don’t look for it live on national or international TV — because from the standpoint of promoting tennis, that would actually make sense.