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post #1 of 39 (permalink) Old 01-27-2006, 10:39 PM Thread Starter
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WHAT????????????????????????????????????WHAT

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post #2 of 39 (permalink) Old 01-28-2006, 08:17 PM Thread Starter
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Re: WHAT????????????????????????????????????WHAT

Paul Thomas: Personality missing in intense tennis

28.01.06

Nicholas Kiefer, David Nalbandian, Marcos Baghdatis - who are these people?

No, they're not Eurovision Song Contest judges or the Chelsea midfield - they're tennis players, semifinalists no less, at the Australian Open, which this weekend, heatwave permitting, trundles to its conclusion.

The fourth men's semifinalist was Roger Federer who, following the departure of Pete Sampras, the imminent departure of Andre Agassi and the ongoing evolution of the women's tour into a gravy train for leggy, pouting Slavs, seems to carry the tennis world on his shoulders.

Which brings me back to my question. What about this Ivan Ljubicic, who was apparently roped in to make up the numbers for the quarter-finals? Well, it turns out he's become the eighth-ranked men's player in the world and has accumulated $5.8 million in prize money without anyone in the real world noticing that he exists.

Tennis has become the sporting equivalent of a 19th-century Russian novel without the tragedy and the grandeur: a slow-moving juggernaut featuring characters with unpronounceable names whom one has great difficulty telling apart.

Who's the one who plays in a negligee: Sharapova, Petrova or Pullova?

Agassi is both the prototype of the modern tennis player and the odd one out. Courtesy of the mandatory obsessive parent, he was introduced to the tennis ball while still in the cot and, if you can believe the legend, was serving overarm on a full-sized court by the time he was 2.

Agassi became a male version of Anna Kournikova, earning millions in what was effectively appearance money. Dolled up in torn-off jeans and eyeliner, he adorned many a schoolgirl's bedroom wall and inspired many a middle-aged woman's toy-boy fantasy.

Against all odds he became a great player and a gracious human being, which makes him exceptional on several counts.

It wasn't always this way. Time was tennis was a freewheeling drama full of vivid and equivocal characters such as Ilie Nastase, who when all else failed zeroed in on his opponents' ethnicity, and Jimmy Connors, whose speciality was a performance art piece - Simulated Sex Act With Tennis Racquet.

Most distinctive of all were Bjorn Borg and John McEnroe, whose epic rivalry transformed the game, and from whose giant shadows succeeding generations of players have struggled to emerge, most unsuccessfully.

So black and white in their differences were these two that they could have been created by a Hollywood scriptwriter with a world view based on John Wayne movies.

Borg was a lank-haired Swede whom the tabloids called "IceBorg" for his blank, nerveless self-possession or "CyBorg" for his machine-like consistency.

Nothing was left to chance. After his parents had watched him lose at Wimbledon in 1975 and win in 1976, he banned them from attending in odd-numbered years.

In the 1980 Wimbledon final Borg blew seven match points in the course of losing a monumental fourth set tie-breaker 18-16. He sat down, checked his racquets and walked back on to the court for the fifth set as if nothing had changed. Which it hadn't: there was still a tennis match to be won.

"I thought Borg would be physically deflated," said McEnroe. "Whatever he had inside him was beyond anything I could imagine."

But having painstakingly constructed this fortress of self-belief, Borg left by the back door. After losing the 1981 US Open final to McEnroe, he skipped the presentations ceremony and drove straight to the airport. Three months later he retired.

As driven and neurotic as his fellow New Yorker Woody Allen, McEnroe had the misfortune to be a perfectionist whose talent bordering on genius made perfection seem attainable.

As a result, many of his matches were a mesmerising blend of artistry, raucous conflict and primal scream therapy.

McEnroe raged against anything that intruded on his quest for perfection: dodgy line calls, camera noise, his own fallibility. When he insisted that one of his more florid outbursts - calling an umpire "a disgrace to mankind" - was actually directed at himself, he wasn't being entirely disingenuous.

Referring to Cyclops, the machine that determines whether serves are in or out, he said, "I don't want to sound paranoid but that machine knows who I am." The last stop on this journey was, not surprisingly, the psychiatrist's couch.

His heir, in tennis terms at least, is Federer, a 24-year-old Swiss.

While some judges believe Federer's well on the way to being the greatest player ever, watching him slouch through his games this week one felt that, for both his sake and the game's, a worthy rival can't emerge soon enough.

Federer knows he can win most matches without having to galvanise himself and his intermittent disengagement from the contest drains it of drama and intensity.

In his brilliant little book On Being John McEnroe the English writer Tim Adams attributes much of McEnroe's theatrics (and private anguish) to Borg's premature retirement, which deprived him of the inspiration to be as good as he could be and the measure for how good that was.

"There was this void," said McEnroe, "and I always felt it was up to me to manufacture my own intensity thereafter."
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post #3 of 39 (permalink) Old 01-28-2006, 08:25 PM Thread Starter
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Re: WHAT????????????????????????????????????WHAT

Updated: Jan. 28, 2006, 2:31 PM ET
Federer a perfect 6-0 in Grand Slam finals


ESPN.com news services

No.1 Roger Federer vs. Marcos Baghdatis

A true David vs. Goliath matchup.

Roger Federer is the world's top-ranked player, having won 23 tournaments since the beginning of 2004, while Marcos Baghdatis has never won a single tournament on the ATP circuit.

To put in perspective how dominant the 24-year old Federer has been, if he wins he'll have more Grand Slam titles than Boris Becker and Stefan Edberg had in their careers.


Federer is the only player in the Open Era to have won his first six Grand Slam finals. With another, the Swiss No. 1 will be one win shy of Pete Sampras' Open Era record of winning eight straight Grand Slam finals.

Federer is the first player since Andre Agassi in 1999 to reach three consecutive Grand Slam finals and hopes to become the first to win three straight since Sampras in 1993-94 ('93 Wimbledon, '93 U.S. Open, and '94 Australian Open).

However, Federer has shown some vulnerability in this tournament. He needed five sets to knock out Tommy Haas, and has gone four sets in his two matches since. His total of four sets lost en route to the final are more than he had in any of his previous six Grand Slam wins.

Federer has won 51 consecutive hard court matches. That's 19 more than the next longest streak in the Open Era.

His opponent, Marcos Baghdatis, has been the biggest surprise of the tournament. Ranked 54th in the world, the Cypriot is playing in just his sixth career Grand Slam event. Interestingly though, five players before him have won their first Grand Slam in fewer attempts.



The last player ranked lower than Baghdatis to win a Grand Slam was Goran Ivanisevic at Wimbledon in 2001, who was ranked 125th. The last unseeded player to win a Grand Slam period was Gaston Gaudio at the French Open two years ago.

Baghdatis is the first player ever from Cyprus (man or woman) to be ranked in the top 100. He is now 9-1 all-time at the Australian Open and 1-4 in the other three Slams combined.

If this match goes the distance, don't necessarily expect Federer to come out on top. His opponent is 6-0 lifetime in five-set matches, including three such wins at this tournament.

If Baghdatis wins on Sunday, he will be the first unseeded winner of this event since Australia's Mark Edmondson 30 years ago.

The finalists have met three times previously with Federer winning each, including a straight-sets win earlier this year in an Aussie Open tuneup. Last year they met at the Australian Open with Federer also winning in straight sets.
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post #4 of 39 (permalink) Old 01-29-2006, 12:45 PM
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Re: WHAT????????????????????????????????????WHAT

Like i said in the other thread please help cheer me up some way I hate the way things are going, I know i shouldnt be against Federer but just the things they say ANNOY ME
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Re: WHAT????????????????????????????????????WHAT

Quote:
Originally Posted by the_natural
Like i said in the other thread please help cheer me up some way I hate the way things are going, I know i shouldnt be against Federer but just the things they say ANNOY ME


Here is some cheering up.
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post #6 of 39 (permalink) Old 01-30-2006, 09:23 AM
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Re: WHAT????????????????????????????????????WHAT

Quote:
Originally Posted by the_natural
Like i said in the other thread please help cheer me up some way I hate the way things are going, I know i shouldnt be against Federer but just the things they say ANNOY ME
They might annoy you, but what there saying you have to admit is true. Roger is a great player and realisticly looks like he's going to end up as the best player to ever play the game! It's not a question of being a fan of Federer or Sampras or Roddick, it's not about any of that, it's just the fact that if Federer keeps this up people just have to accept, he's going to end his career probablly with more grand slam titles then Sampras! I understand some people get annoyed because of all the great things people say about Roger, but just because they say those things dosen't mean those things are not true!
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Re: WHAT????????????????????????????????????WHAT

Quote:
Originally Posted by jacobhiggins
They might annoy you, but what there saying you have to admit is true. Roger is a great player and realisticly looks like he's going to end up as the best player to ever play the game! It's not a question of being a fan of Federer or Sampras or Roddick, it's not about any of that, it's just the fact that if Federer keeps this up people just have to accept, he's going to end his career probablly with more grand slam titles then Sampras! I understand some people get annoyed because of all the great things people say about Roger, but just because they say those things dosen't mean those things are not true!
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post #8 of 39 (permalink) Old 01-31-2006, 12:28 AM
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Re: WHAT????????????????????????????????????WHAT

Quote:
Originally Posted by jacobhiggins
They might annoy you, but what there saying you have to admit is true. Roger is a great player and realisticly looks like he's going to end up as the best player to ever play the game! It's not a question of being a fan of Federer or Sampras or Roddick, it's not about any of that, it's just the fact that if Federer keeps this up people just have to accept, he's going to end his career probablly with more grand slam titles then Sampras! I understand some people get annoyed because of all the great things people say about Roger, but just because they say those things dosen't mean those things are not true!

Oh no not this loser, ive seen him on other fan boards, he knows absoultley nothing about tennis and talks complete Bull$hit IF ITS NOT ABOUT BEING A FAN OF A PLAYER THEN WHY ARE U THE BIGGEST FEDERER FAN BOY AROUND!!?!
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post #9 of 39 (permalink) Old 01-31-2006, 01:14 AM
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Re: WHAT????????????????????????????????????WHAT

The Natural, what is your problem. I didn't say one mean thing to you yet you start calling people names because what there saying you don't agree with, no matter how true it is. Your posts have showed that you don't know much about tennis and your name calling shows that you are a punk. I hate people who just start watching tennis and think they know everything. Natural, you need to watch some tapes of players from the past and you need to stop calling people names. You sound stupid when you post like that!
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post #10 of 39 (permalink) Old 01-31-2006, 11:50 PM Thread Starter
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Re: WHAT????????????????????????????????????WHAT

Quote:
Originally Posted by jacobhiggins
They might annoy you, but what there saying you have to admit is true. Roger is a great player and realisticly looks like he's going to end up as the best player to ever play the game! It's not a question of being a fan of Federer or Sampras or Roddick, it's not about any of that, it's just the fact that if Federer keeps this up people just have to accept, he's going to end his career probablly with more grand slam titles then Sampras! I understand some people get annoyed because of all the great things people say about Roger, but just because they say those things dosen't mean those things are not true!

They might be true or not my friend jacobhiggins, but it was not so long ago some of these same people singing Pete's praise to no ends, that is why I am not going to believe most have what is been said, because we human can be so fickle, sport is a cycle my friend, and who to say in the next two years are so, they will be saying something else all together,or coming down on Roger, remember we are a bunch of frickle lots. Take my words for it.

And another thing, until Roger surpass Pete's records, then they can talk to me, since he hasn't done it yet, well you get my drift, who know what is going to happen, tomorrow, next week or year.

They did say the same thing about the Williams sisters and lots of other more, dont they.

Last edited by angiel; 01-31-2006 at 11:54 PM.
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post #11 of 39 (permalink) Old 02-01-2006, 12:20 AM Thread Starter
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Re: WHAT????????????????????????????????????WHAT

Tennis: Wimbledon remains the Holy Grail

31.01.06
By Darren Walton



MELBOURNE - Two questions continue to burn after Roger Federer downed Marcos Baghdatis to win his second Australian Open tennis title.

Will the Swiss superstar eventually eclipse Pete Sampras' benchmark 14 majors? And will he complete the "Roger Slam" at this year's French Open and hold all four of the sport's major trophies simultaneously?

Not since Rod Laver in 1969 has one man been reigning Australian, French, Wimbledon and US Open champion all at once.

But while few would bet their house against Federer achieving the feat, he was adamant the French Open, however nice it would be to win, was not the be-all and end-all.

Wimbledon remains top priority.

The 24-year-old will still be a contented man even if, like Sampras, a French Open title is the gaping hole on his resume when he retires.

Federer accepts the spotlight will burn brightest when he arrives at Roland Garros as the first man since Sampras in 1994 with an opportunity to complete the sweep of Slams.

But he is not prepared to move heaven and earth to do it, and makes no apologies for that.

"I enjoy winning tournaments. I enjoy playing well at Slams. Obviously, I know the importance of winning the French, what it would do to my career.

"But, again, Wimbledon is the one for me. And if I keep on winning Wimbledon and not the French, I'm very happy about that, too.

"So that's no problem."

Not that Federer doesn't give himself a shot at triumphing on the Parisian clay, the surface on which he grew up learning the game.

Federer will consider asking his Australian coach Tony Roche, whose only Grand Slam singles title came at the 1966 French Open, to join him a week earlier this year as they try to plot a path to Roland Garros glory - and, most particularly, a way to beat claycourt king Rafael Nadal.

Nadal upstaged Federer in four sets in last year's semifinals and eventually amassed nine claycourt titles for the season before missing the Australian Open with a foot injury.

"He [Roche] is definitely coming for that trip again, I'm very happy about [that]. I think he also knows the importance of the French and of the clay," Federer said.

"I think the more time I spend with him, the more information I get about playing on clay.

"Just being together and working together, it's very interesting.

"I thought I played the right way last year at the French. Maybe I didn't play as great as I was hoping to, but I still gave myself a chance.

"I thought the match against Nadal was decent ... he was better on the day. Best player by far on clay last season. He totally deserved the French. I hope he'll be back by then and I get a chance to play him again."

But even if winning the French is not an obsession, Federer is aware he is closing in on tennis history.

He has moved past Don Budge, Jack Crawford, Boris Becker and Stefan Edberg into 11th place on the Grand Slam honour roll to be exactly halfway towards matching Sampras' 14 majors.

"I left my idols behind me now. That means something. I'm very pleased. But they still stay my heroes - Becker and Edberg," Federer said.

"Definitely on a great roll at the moment. I don't forget that it's been a tough road for me.

"I amaze myself every time I do well. It's been so consistent, too, winning so many slams, seven out of the last 11. It's quite incredible.

"I try to keep it up, stay healthy and keep enjoying it because that's what I'm doing, and I think that's what makes me play well."

Federer admitted it was frightening to compare his uncannily similar career thus far to Sampras', but insisted he wasn't in desperate pursuit of the American's record.

"We were almost born on the same day, just a few days apart and exactly 10 years [difference]," he said.

"[At the same age] he has one or two tournament victories more, the same amount of slams, just a couple of weeks more No 1.

"It's quite scary actually. If you compare it, it's basically the same.

"We won Indian Wells, Key Biscayne back-to-back, we won the Masters also twice each.

"I'm on the same road, but I've got to maintain it and he's the happy guy who already did everything.

"I've got to do everything still, so it's a long road. It would be great just to challenge it, but it's not my priority.

"It's really to have fun and enjoy the tour and try to win as many tournaments as possible and just enjoy it with the fans."

Federer is happy being the people's champion, but there is no doubt he is on course to becoming the greatest champion the game has seen.

SLAM RECORDS

Sampras Slams

1990 US Open
1993 Wimbledon
1993 US Open
1993 Australian Open
1994 Wimbledon
1995 Wimbledon
1995 US Open
1996 US Open
1997 Australian Open
1997 Wimbledon
1998 Wimbledon
1999 Wimbledon
2000 Wimbledon
2002 US Open

Most Slams

14 Pete Sampras
12 Roy Emerson
11 Bjorn Borg
11 Rod Laver
10 Bill Tilden
8 Jimmy Conners
8 Ivan Lendl
8 Fred Perry
8 Ken Rosewall
8 Andre Agassi

Roger Slams

2003 Wimbledon
2004 US Open
2004 Wimbledon
2004 Australian Open
2005 US Open
2005 Wimbledon
2006 Australian Open

- AAP
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post #12 of 39 (permalink) Old 02-01-2006, 12:28 AM Thread Starter
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Re: WHAT????????????????????????????????????WHAT

No elementary talent

Joseph DiGiulio, a 10-year-old Newport Beach resident, has shown plenty of growth potential on the court.

By Natalie Venegas, Daily Pilot


When Joseph DiGiulio played in his first tournament three years ago this month, he had never competed in a match. He wasn't even sure of how the scoring worked.

But when he won that first tournament, coaches paid attention. When he won the next three, his parents knew he was different. Now, three years and two national championships later, some believe the 10-year-old Newport Beach resident may have a special future in the sport.



DiGiulio, rated No. 20 in the nation and No. 5 in Southern California in his age group, has been competing up in the 12-and-under division. After dominating at that level, he said he is moving on to the 14s, where the 4-foot-8 prodigy will compete against boys up to twice his size -- exactly how he likes it.

"He's not affected by pressure," said Billy McQuade, his coach since he began three years ago at the Palisades Tennis Club. "He doesn't yell, he doesn't swear, he doesn't throw his racquet. You can't even tell if he's up, 5-0, or down, 5-0. His court presence is something I've never seen in all my years. You just can't teach that."

The budding star just returned from Arizona, where he competed at the United States Tennis Assn. National Winter Championships. After losing a match in the third round, the Pete Sampras look-alike won six consecutive matches to win the Boys' 12 singles consolation northeast draw.

DiGiulio then won in singles and doubles, the latter with David Blakely, at the Copper Bowl, in Tucson, Ariz. He won six straight singles matches to claim the crown.

"He says he wants to be a tennis pro," McQuade said. "In all my years, I have never seen someone so focused."

But the fifth-grader is focused on more than tennis.

He practices five or six days a week, while also collecting straight A's at St. Catherine Catholic School in Laguna Beach.

He has the maturity and the backswing of an adult, but displays a child-like passion for tennis, as well as pursuits away from the court.

"I really like hanging out with friends and with my brother," DiGiulio said. "I like math, I like spelling, I like going swimming, and I like tennis because it's pretty fun."

His father, Paul DiGiulio, said his son is always racing home asking about what tournament is coming up next.

"When he gets home from school, he can't wait to get on the tennis courts," said his mother, April DiGiulio. "He started playing golf, but then he told me, 'Mommy, this is boring.' And he hasn't wanted to play any other sport since."

After dominating the 12s, DiGiulio told his coach and his parents he wanted more competition, not only in matches, but also at the club, where he plays against college kids as well as the club's top players.

"He's used to such strong hitters and people twice his size, but he's not intimidated," his father said. "He doesn't act like a 10-year-old. He has the mind of an adult. He's all concentration and doesn't let anything distract him. He's so consistent, he's like a machine every game."

When asked why he craves shuffling across the court with older players, DiGiulio said, "it's more fun because there's more competition and it's more challenging."

Last weekend DiGiulio attended the Whittier Open. Having won the 12s singles title at the tournament last season, he competed in the 14s. For the first time in four years, he lost in the first round.

Even though DiGiulio, who has sponsorship deals with a shoe company and a racquet manufacturer, lost to a player 14 inches taller, McQuade said it's only a hiccup.

"Everyone has to lose once in a while," McQuade said. "It makes you appreciate winning more. It's a good experience and he's ready to compete again."
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Re: WHAT????????????????????????????????????WHAT

Laver turns heads at Australian Open
January 29, 2006 - 7:09PM


It's the sort of old-fashioned hero worship where a father discreetly points as he leans down and whispers to his son: "That's him, that's Rod Laver."

Laver visited the Australian Open this week for the first time in a while, and plenty of kids learned that not all great Australian tennis players wore their hats backwards.

He had a stroke a few years ago and more recently, a knee replacement.

But even as he approaches his 68th birthday, there is still something about the greatest tennis player there's ever been.

It makes you want to stare at him and wonder what it used to be like and what he thinks about today's game and players.

What was his best grand slam win, what does he think about the modern racquets, why don't they serve and volley like they used to and the old favourite: "How many grand slams would you have won if you hadn't turned pro."

The best part is that he doesn't mind telling you, and he does it thoughtfully and easily.

For the thousandth time.

It's no secret that Laver is the hero of his latest successor as the world's No.1 player, Roger Federer, just as he was to the previous star of the game, Pete Sampras.

Laver's hero, he says, was Lew Hoad, but he also has a reciprocal admiration for Federer.

"There's a lot of ingredients go into being a good tennis player," Laver said.

Federer, he believes, has most of them.

"As soon as they make a mistake, Roger just sits on them," he said.

"His court coverage is uncanny ... he can do it all from behind the baseline, but if they slip up, he's in there.

"If his backhand's in good shape, he just rolls."

But as much as anything else, he recognises in Federer some of the things he saw in himself.

"He looks like he's enjoying the game," Laver said.

"And he speaks so well about it."

"I was fortunate because I learned the game as an amateur and got to love it."

As for that decision to join the professional tour after he won his first grand slam of the four majors in 1962, Laver would do the same again.

The decision meant he couldn't play the grand slam championships for another five years, and two years after the "open" era began, he won his second slam.

"I have no regrets about turning pro," he said.

"I had a lot of trophies but you had to earn a living.

"As well as that, all the best players were pros and I wanted to play against the best."

© 2006 AAP
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January 29, 2006 latimes.com : Sports : Tennis

She Couldn't Gut It Out
Henin-Hardenne's withdrawal in middle of Australian Open final has drawn criticism, despite her history of playing through illness.

By Lisa Dillman, Times Staff Writer


MELBOURNE, Australia — Pete Sampras' throwing up on the court at the U.S. Open, and going on to beat Alex Corretja, is burned deep into tennis fans' memories.

There was Andre Agassi hobbling through the final two sets of an agonizing five-set loss to Jarkko Nieminen last year at the French Open, barely able to move because of an injured back, which would keep him out of Wimbledon.


Serena Williams grimly forged ahead despite an abdominal injury, losing to Maria Sharapova in the final of the season-ending WTA Championships in 2004. This was a significant career correction for Williams, who once had quit because of an injury when she was a couple of games away from losing to Virginia Ruano Pascual at Wimbledon in 1998 in the third round.

All brave, and widely chronicled efforts, to be sure. But just how should someone who takes the other path be regarded?

More questions were raised than answered about Justine Henin-Hardenne's decision to quit, citing an upset stomach, in the second set of the Australian Open final against Amelie Mauresmo, who was winning 6-1, 2-0. It was the first time it had happened in the women's final at a Grand Slam in the Open Era.

The episode largely went against past performances by Henin-Hardenne. This is the same woman who needed an IV in the early-morning hours after a grueling semifinal win against Jennifer Capriati at the U.S. Open in 2003 and, despite looking as though she was running on empty, returned later that night to defeat countrywoman Kim Clijsters of Belgium in the final.

She once stayed on the court against Mauresmo, despite blowing a set and a 5-2 lead in the second at a clay-court event at Amelia Island in 2004, and said she felt weak during the loss. She subsequently was diagnosed with a debilitating virus. At the 2004 French Open, as the defending champion, Henin-Hardenne completed a second-round match despite suffering from flu and bronchitis, losing to a qualifier.

This track record didn't help her much in some quarters of the court of public opinion.

Mauresmo was asked about the issue of professionalism.

"What can I say? Am I going to make controversy about that?" she said. "No. That's not the day for this for me."

Henin-Hardenne didn't get much help afterward — but maybe that was her decision. A statement from the doctors or trainers who treated her might have quieted some of the critics. But some of the wounds were self-inflicted during her post-match news conference as she appeared less than complimentary when asked about how well Mauresmo was playing.

"I think she had a lot of time because I was very far from my baseline, no energy, nothing in my ball," Henin-Hardenne said. "So she had a lot of time. When you have this kind of time, it's pretty hard to do mistakes."

This was from someone who, less than 24 hours earlier, had spoken about how great she was feeling, saying convincingly, "In the last two years, I never felt as good as now."
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Re: WHAT????????????????????????????????????WHAT

Quote:
Originally Posted by jacobhiggins
The Natural, what is your problem. I didn't say one mean thing to you yet you start calling people names because what there saying you don't agree with, no matter how true it is. Your posts have showed that you don't know much about tennis and your name calling shows that you are a punk. I hate people who just start watching tennis and think they know everything. Natural, you need to watch some tapes of players from the past and you need to stop calling people names. You sound stupid when you post like that!

Yeh Ive seen the way you post on Tennis.com, "Federer was proclaimed the greatest at 24 years old, Federer would destroy pete in all their matches, Federer Destroys 150 MPH Serves, thats an idiot talking, your the idiot who has never watched old tennis matches, Ive been watching that Debate about Sampras and Federer and you always come up with the most biased statements and you say as much as possible to put pete down. Ive been watching Tennis since the days Of Mcenroe and Edberg and I know a hell of alot more than you. Your the one who became a fan BECAUSE of Federer and youve always harped on about how federer is "perfect" and Sampras was "nothing". Get over yourself
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