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post #1 of 38 (permalink) Old 03-19-2004, 07:12 PM Thread Starter
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Books, articles, interviews (non-tennis)

I thought I'd create a thread for some stuff we sometimes discuss in our chat thread, but where it then gets burried in all the posts there.

We could use this thread for all written stuff (books, articles, interviews) we'd like to discuss; things that we think are interesting to some people in here, or matters that shocked us, touched us,... or just advice re books we love reading and would like to recommend... anything along those lines, really.

I got the idea when we created some threads re some TV shows/films.
(finally made the thread )

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"Follow your bliss and don't be afraid, and doors will open where you didn't know they were going to be."
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post #2 of 38 (permalink) Old 03-23-2004, 04:29 AM
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Re: Books, articles, interviews (non-tennis)

This is a great idea! Unfortunately I am feeling very uninspired!
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post #3 of 38 (permalink) Old 03-23-2004, 10:58 AM
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My current reading...if anyone wants to discuss.

Still reading Isak Dinesen - Seven Gothic Tales, brilliant storytelling, can't really compare her to anyone elses I can think of, and she seems to really overuse the comma, which I can really relate to, but she makes it work...

"When we are young, the idea of death or failure is intolerable to us; even the possibility of ridicule we cannot bear. But we have also an unconquerable faith in our own stars, and in the impossibility of anything venturing to go against us. As we grow old we slowly come to believe that everything will turn out badly for us, and that failure is in the nature of things; but then we do not much mind what happens to us one way or the other. In this way a balance is maintained."

Audacious, but it struck a chord.

Also just read Patricia Cornwall's 'true-crime' novel arguing, not particularly convincingly, that Jack the Ripper's real identity is british impressionist painter Walter Sickert

Philosophy - tormenting myself with Pascal a little.
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post #4 of 38 (permalink) Old 03-23-2004, 07:21 PM
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Re: Books, articles, interviews (non-tennis)

Quote:
Originally Posted by dagmar7
Also just read Patricia Cornwall's 'true-crime' novel arguing, not particularly convincingly, that Jack the Ripper's real identity is british impressionist painter Walter Sickert
I bought that for my forensically-minded flatmate and she was unconvinced. I also saw Cornwell's documentary which was full of 'possibly', 'maybe', 'perhaps' and was just a little inconclusive for my liking. I found her analysis of Sickert's paintings quite interesting though.

Has anyone read Sarah Orne Jewett? Capote listed her as one of his influences and I have just found a beautifully bound set of her novels (published 1900) on our library shelves. She was obviously big at some stage -has she dropped out of the canon or am I just exposing yet more fearful ignorance?
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post #5 of 38 (permalink) Old 03-24-2004, 10:04 AM
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Re: Books, articles, interviews (non-tennis)

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Originally Posted by duck
I bought that for my forensically-minded flatmate and she was unconvinced. I also saw Cornwell's documentary which was full of 'possibly', 'maybe', 'perhaps' and was just a little inconclusive for my liking. I found her analysis of Sickert's paintings quite interesting though.
It was interesting to read. Most convincing part of her argument for me - the evidence re some of the many letters that 'Jack the Ripper' sent to the police, newspapers etc. Matching watermarks, artist's supplies used in the creation of some of them, the quality of the doodles and the handwriting and it was one of the letters that produced the matching (mitochondrial) dna that she attaches such importance to.

Least convincing - bases a lot of her argument on building up a profile for him that she believe is consistent with that of a psychopath: secretive, selfish, problems with women, contempt for authority, possibly impotent. The problem with this is that - with the exception of the impotence - this could describe arguably over half the writers and artists of that time. T. S. Eliot anyone? She skirts over the evidence that he might have been in France at the time of some of the killings. Most people who study the murders believe that the killer would have to be expert or practised with a knife - surgeon, fish gutter, butcher etc.- she dismisses this pretty summarily. Lots of other stuff... Some stuff made me think though. His paintings are creepy and frequently seem to represent scenarios involving murdered women and the photos of the Ripper's victims, but murdered women were a popular theme in a lot of art, not really evidence. Edgar Allan Poe: "the death of a beautiful woman is the most poetical topic in the world."

Of course, the fact that this attitude is cultural - not really reassuring.

Quote:
Originally Posted by duck
Has anyone read Sarah Orne Jewett? Capote listed her as one of his influences and I have just found a beautifully bound set of her novels (published 1900) on our library shelves. She was obviously big at some stage -has she dropped out of the canon or am I just exposing yet more fearful ignorance?
One novella/long short story - The White Heron, which my grandmother gave me, a beautifully illustrated version.

Very polished writing with an incredible feeling for the natural world, the latter perhaps accounting for her fall from fashion. I have a copy of The Country of the Pointed Firs, but haven't got around to reading it yet.
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post #6 of 38 (permalink) Old 03-24-2004, 10:11 PM Thread Starter
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Re: Books, articles, interviews (non-tennis)

have been posting this in our chat thread, so I'd better should put it here:

interesting book on fats: From: Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrats by Sally Fallon with Mary G. Enig, PhD

See: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/AS...776911-2728667

comment: it's great, gives great insight (other books of them too) but as so many health books it shouldn't be your 'bible' either. Every scientist has his or her preferences after all, and sometimes 'forgets' the whole picture upon focusing on one thing. I do think this book is a must read if you're interested in your health, but with the above in the back of your mind.

I'm no vegetarian, but on the other hand I'm very careful with what I eat as meat and how much though.

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"Follow your bliss and don't be afraid, and doors will open where you didn't know they were going to be."
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post #7 of 38 (permalink) Old 07-12-2004, 04:27 PM
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Re: Books, articles, interviews (non-tennis)

bump
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post #8 of 38 (permalink) Old 07-12-2004, 04:36 PM
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Re: Books, articles, interviews (non-tennis)

Gracias Angele

Read these books!



Americans have lost touch with their history, and in this thought-provoking book, Professor James Loewen shows why. After surveying twelve leading high school American history texts, he has concluded that not one does a decent job of making history interesting or memorable. Marred by an embarrassing combination of blind patriotism, mindless optimism, sheer misinformation, and outright lies, these books omit almost all the ambiguity, passion, conflict, and drama from our past. In ten powerful chapters, Loewen reveals that:

The United States dropped three times as many tons of explosives in Vietman as it dropped in all theaters of World War II, including Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Ponce de Leon went to Florida mainly to capture Native Americans as slaves for Hispaniola, not to find the mythical fountain of youth

Woodrow Wilson, known as a progressive leader, was in fact a white supremacist who personally vetoed a clause on racial equality in the Covenant of the League of Nations

The first colony to legalize slavery was not Virginia but Massachusetts

From the truth about Columbus's historic voyages to an honest evaluation of our national leaders, Loewen revives our history, restoring to it the vitality and relevance it truly possesses.



“I think I could be a good woman, if I had five thousand a year,” observes beautiful and clever Becky Sharp, one of the wickedest—and most appealing—women in all of literature. Becky is just one of the many fascinating figures that populate William Makepeace Thackeray’s novel Vanity Fair, a wonderfully satirical panorama of upper-middle-class life and manners in London at the beginning of the nineteenth century.
Scorned for her lack of money and breeding, Becky must use all her wit, charm and considerable sex appeal to escape her drab destiny as a governess. From London’s ballrooms to the battlefields of Waterloo, the bewitching Becky works her wiles on a gallery of memorable characters, including her lecherous employer, Sir Pitt, his rich sister, Miss Crawley, and Pitt’s dashing son, Rawdon, the first of Becky’s misguided sexual entanglements.

Filled with hilarious dialogue and superb characterizations, Vanity Fair is a richly entertaining comedy that asks the reader, “Which of us is happy in this world? Which of us has his desire? or, having it, is satisfied?”



I Capture the Castle tells the story of seventeen-year-old Cassandra and her family, who live in not-so-genteel poverty in a ramshackle old English castle. Here she strives, over six turbulent months, to hone her writing skills. She fills three notebooks with sharply funny yet poignant entries. Her journals candidly chronicle the great changes that take place within the castle's walls, and her own first descent into love. By the time she pens her final entry, she has "captured the castle"--and the heart of the reader--in one of literature's most enchanting entertainments.

Brazen Barmy Bitch

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"I'm just on a mission today. But the end result, you will feel better."
"Not when you go home alone tonight I won't..."

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post #9 of 38 (permalink) Old 07-12-2004, 04:39 PM
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Re: Books, articles, interviews (non-tennis)

I'm gonna add I Capture the Castle to my reading book but skip the two others for now Vanity Fair is going to be a movie I believe so I'll watch it And I don't particularily like history
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post #10 of 38 (permalink) Old 07-12-2004, 04:44 PM
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Re: Books, articles, interviews (non-tennis)

I recommend reading anything at all by Nicholas Sparks, all his books are amazing. My personal favorites are The Notebook and A Bend in the Road They're all great though so you can't go wrong. The only one that I know nothing about is Three Weeks with my Brother which is his latest but it can't help but be great imo. And then of course there is The Bronze Horseman and Tatiana and Alexander by Paullina Simons which is a must read. I bet even you'd like it Marly It's romance but it's set during the war. It's heart breaking and heart warming all at the sam time, definetly a must read!
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post #11 of 38 (permalink) Old 07-12-2004, 04:44 PM
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Re: Books, articles, interviews (non-tennis)

You should always read the book before you watch the movie

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"I'm just on a mission today. But the end result, you will feel better."
"Not when you go home alone tonight I won't..."

"What is your good luck charm?"
"You."
--Derek and Shannon
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post #12 of 38 (permalink) Old 07-12-2004, 04:45 PM
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Re: Books, articles, interviews (non-tennis)

If there's more war than romance, I might like it

Brazen Barmy Bitch

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"I'm just on a mission today. But the end result, you will feel better."
"Not when you go home alone tonight I won't..."

"What is your good luck charm?"
"You."
--Derek and Shannon
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post #13 of 38 (permalink) Old 07-12-2004, 04:48 PM
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Re: Books, articles, interviews (non-tennis)



From Publishers Weekly
Set in her native St. Petersburg, Russia, Simons's latest thick novel (after Tully, etc.) focuses on a WWII love affair. As the story opens, Tatiana, the youngest member of the Metanova family, is just 17; she still shares a bed with her older sister, Dasha. Not long after the country goes to war with Germany, Tatiana meets Alexander, a soldier, and sparks fly. It turns out, however, that Alexander is the same soldier Dasha has been crowing about. Possessed of a strong sense of family loyalty, and living under conditions that permit no privacy, Tatiana refuses to interfere with her sister's happiness, but the attraction between Tatiana and Alexander proves too powerful. Complicating matters, another soldier, Dimitri, has information that could destroy Alexander, and Dimitri likes Tatiana, too. In order to protect both Dasha's feelings and Alexander's life, the star-crossed lovers become part of a deceptive quadrangle as war intensifies around them. Taking her title from a tragic poem by Alexandr Pushkin, Simons skillfully highlights the ironies of the socialist utopia. Despite the novel's sprawling length and its seemingly epic scope, the nearly single-minded focus on dialogue between Tatiana and Alexander leaves other character development shortchanged and the reader with the impression of a peculiarly tiny canvas. Nave and occupying the Cinderella role in her family, Tatiana is certainly a survivor though one who finally outstays her welcome. While her love story is often both tender and fierce, it is also overwrought and prolonged past the breaking point. (June)Forecast: An advertising blitz, five-city author tour and glamorous jacket may distract readers from the novel's shortcomings and ensure short-term success (foreign rights have been sold in 10 countries), but this is not the Russian Thorn Birds the publisher hopes it will be.
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post #14 of 38 (permalink) Old 07-12-2004, 04:51 PM
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Re: Books, articles, interviews (non-tennis)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lusty MacBreast
If there's more war than romance, I might like it
It's hard to stay if there's more of one than the other... it's probably half and half I'd say. I think you'd like it though, much more than any of my Nicholas Sparks books anyway
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post #15 of 38 (permalink) Old 07-12-2004, 04:56 PM
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Re: Books, articles, interviews (non-tennis)



He is a man with an unknown past and an uncertain future. A man dragged from the sea riddled with bullets, his face altered by plastic surgery--a man bearing the dubious identity of Jason Bourne.

Now he is running for his life, the target of professional assassins, at the center of a maddeneing, deadly puzzle. Who is Jason Bourne? To answer that question, he must find the secret buried deep in his own past. And the only one who can help him is a beautiful woman who once would do anything to escape him.

Brazen Barmy Bitch

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"I'm just on a mission today. But the end result, you will feel better."
"Not when you go home alone tonight I won't..."

"What is your good luck charm?"
"You."
--Derek and Shannon
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