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post #1 of 65 (permalink) Old 03-23-2005, 03:43 PM Thread Starter
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Cool The Nasdaq-100 Discussion Thread

Thought maybe it would be good to start a thread where we can talk about everything related to TMS Nasdaq and not have a bunch of separate threads like "Ha! Ha! Look at Andy's draw!" or "Can anyone stop JesusFed?"

Here's Tennis-x's preview of Miami:

Here is the quarter-by-quarter breakdown for version 2005 of the Masters Series-Miami:

Top Quarter

Seeds: (1) Roger Federer, (6) Tim Henman, (10) Joachim Johansson, (16) Tommy Haas, (1 Mario Ancic, (23) Radek Stepanek, (2 Juan Ignacio Chela, (30) Paradorn Srichaphan

Floaters: Ivo Karlovic, Mardy Fish, Julien Benneteau, Juan Monaco

A few potential challenges for Federer as mentioned above, with huge-serving "Dr." Ivo Karlovic likely in his opener (all the seeds receive first-round byes) and then No. 30 seed Paradorn "The Thai Fighter" Srichaphan before meeting the big boys in either Haas or Ancic (or Fish, who as they say, is "due"). Henman, the second-highest seed in the quarter, could be up against it from the start in an opener against Argentine Army member Juan "The Principality" Monaco, who last year in Miami upset Joachim "The Jackhammer" Johansson and Guga Kuerten. Other opening-round matches of note in the section are Fish vs. a qualifier (winner to face (16) Haas), French comer Julien "United Colors of" Benneteau vs. Sargis "Sarge" Sargsian (winner to get a gift vs. (23) Stepanek), and undercooked American wildcard "The" Donald Young vs. a qualifier (winner to face (2 Juan Ignacio "The Spitting Snake" Chela). If "The Jackhammer" Johansson has healed from his shoulder problems of late, the big-serving Swede would be a tester for Club Fed in the quarters.

Second Quarter

Seeds: (4) Guillermo Coria, (7) Gaston Gaudio, (9) Andre Agassi, (15) Fernando Gonzalez, (19) Feliciano Lopez, (22) Nicolas Kiefer, (27) Sebastien Grosjean, (31) Taylor Dent

Floaters: Florian Mayer, Mark Philippoussis, Paul-Henri Mathieu, Tomas Berdych

Agassi, Gonzalez and Dent are salivating at their chances here, with the Argentines Gaudio and the recovering-from-injury Coria not scaring anyone. Dent and Coria should meet in the third round, with Gaudio granted a cake walk at least until a fourth-round confrontation with Agassi or Feliciano "F-Lo" Lopez. Opening-round match-ups to watch for are (22) Kiefer vs. Florian "Oscar" Mayer in an all-German (if Mayer can bypass a qualifier in his opener), wildcard car-crash Mark Philippoussis vs. a qualifier (winner to face (15) Fernando "Gonzo" Gonzalez), (9) Agassi in a potential second-rounder vs. the confidence-riding Paul-Henri Mathieu who has tested the American in both their meetings, and (19) F-Lo vs. Tomas "I Beat Federer in '04" Berdych in a potential second-rounder. If Agassi's toe is truly healed, the American doesn't face a whole lot of resistance in reaching the quarterfinals versus likely opponents Dent or Gonzalez.

Third Quarter

Seeds: (3) Marat Safin, ( David Nalbandian, (11) Guillermo Canas, (14) Nikolay Davydenko, (17) Mikhail Youzhny, (20) Andrei Pavel, (26) Dominik Hrbaty, (32) Xavier Malisse

Floaters: Jurgen Melzer, Juan Carlos Ferrero, Gael Monfils, Thomas Enqvist

Perhaps the weakest quarter, a couple players could go for the steal depending on which Marat Safin and which David Nalbandian show up. Safin won the Australian, then bombed out in the first round at Dubai and early at Indian Wells, claiming he played his "worst match ever." Nalbandian likewise did well at the Australian but then lost early at Marseille, Rotterdam and Indian Wells, where he was pasted by Nicolas Kiefer. Safin has a safe opener against the too-streaky Irakli "Freak Show" Labadze, who is apparently in the midst of passing a kidney stone (ouch) or the struggling-with-injury Younes El Aynaoui. Nalbandian on the other hand has a tricky opener against giant-killer Jurgen "Tuna" Melzer. Other openers to look for are the former No. 1 Ferrero vs. American wildcard Brendan Evans (winner to face (11) Canas), wildcard Gael "Force" Monfils vs. Michael Llodra in an all-French struggle (winner to face (14) Davydenko), and a big-hitting conflict when Swedish veteran Thomas Enqvist squares off against Korean net-rusher Hyung-Taik Lee (winner to face (17) Youzhny). Anything goes in this section, with Safin's draw a soft one against the off-kilter Dominik "The Dominator" Hrbaty in the third round, then Russian counterparts Davydenko or Youzhny in the fourth before a likely quarterfinal against Nalbandian or Canas.

Bottom Quarter

Seeds: (2) Andy Roddick, (5) Carlos Moya, (12) Tommy Robredo, (13) Ivan Ljubicic, (21) Vince Spadea, (24) Jiri Novak, (25) Thomas Johansson, (29) Rafael Nadal

Floaters: James Blake, Greg Rusedski, Max Mirnyi, Rainer Schuettler, Fernando Verdasco

As a player, this is the section of the draw you didn't want to land in. Two former No. 1s in Roddick and Moya, three former slam champs, five former slam finalists, and a big bald Croatian with a lot of confidence. Roddick's opener could be against Fernando "Hot Sauce" Verdasco, who he barely edged in three sets last week in Indian Wells, if the Spaniard can get by Peter "Nuclear" Wessels in his opener. Moya's road is no easier with a likely opener against the hungry hard-hitting James Blake, and "Grinning" Greg Rusedski or (25) T.Johansson waiting in the next round. The hot-handed Ljubicic has a cushy draw, with (21) Spadea the first resistance in the third round, and a potential Davis Cup rematch with Roddick in the fourth round. Other openers to look for are Max "The Beast" Mirnyi vs. Jonas Bjorkman in a veteran battle (winner to face (12) Robredo), and potential seeded openers in (29) Rafael "The Prodigy" Nadal vs. Rainer "He's So 2003" Schuettler, and (21) "Vincenzo" Spadea vs. Robby "Baby Courier" Ginepri in an all-American "C"-squad match-up. If Roddick can get by the firepower of Nadal and Ljubicic, a repeat of last week's Indian Wells stunner against Moya could be in the making in the quarterfinals.

In last year's final Roddick captured his third career Masters Series win after Argentina's Guillermo Coria retired during the best-of-five-set final with a back injury with the American leading 6-7(2), 6-3, 6-1.

Returning champions this week in Miami are Roddick (2004) and the six-time champ Agassi (2003-01,'96-95,'90). Defending the doubles title will be Zimbabwe's Wayne Black and Kevin Ullyett, who last year upset Jonas Bjorkman and Todd Woodbridge in the final.

"What kind of shape am I in now? Well round is a shape." said Roddick with a laugh. "I had a very detailed retirement plan, and I feel like I've met every aspect of it: a lot of golf, a lot of carbs, a lot of fried food, and some booze, occasionally — I've been completely committed ... The results have shown."


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post #2 of 65 (permalink) Old 03-23-2005, 03:55 PM Thread Starter
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Re: The Nasdaq-100 Discussion Thread

We're even allowed to mention Roger's name in here.



Pursuing Federer boosts interest

Miami Herald
March 23, 2005

The post-Pete Sampras vacuum in men's tennis has been charitably described as a ''transition period.'' Or you could just call it what it was: Dull.

While women's tennis was producing rich rivalries and memorable matches, men's tennis was about as intriguing as a two-shot rally. Wham, bam, yawn.

No more. Men's tennis has found its new star -- the sublime Roger Federer -- and he has three worthy adversaries. Andy Roddick, Marat Safin and Lleyton Hewitt have all lost to Federer more than they have beaten him, but the chase has just begun. It continues for the next week and a half at the NASDAQ-100 Open, the ''fifth major,'' right here on Key Biscayne.

The Fantastic Four -- all but Hewitt (toe injury) will be playing in the NASDAQ-100 -- give the game a chance to return to the heights of the 1970s and 1980s, when the diverse playing styles and clashing personalities of the likes of Jimmy Connors, Bjorn Borg, John McEnroe, Ivan Lendl and Boris Becker made tennis so entertaining.

With Andre Agassi in the twilight of his career, tennis needs a charisma replenishment. Federer, Roddick, Safin and Hewitt have converged at the right moment. This is a quartet with high Q ratings.

Federer is like an exquisite Swiss timepiece. Even casual fans marvel at his movement and artistry. He won three Grand Slams last year. Already he is being compared to the greatest players in history.

Roddick personifies everything American: The rocket serve, the bared emotions, the baseball cap. He talks fast, plays faster.

Safin is the Russian conundrum. You never know what you'll get. Will he smash another racket (as he has done more than once)? Pull his shorts down (as he did at the French Open last year)? Argue with a linesman? Built like a middle linebacker, he possesses a rare combination of power, shot-making skill and agility that can defeat anybody, if he can win his own head games.

Like the Australian Outback, Hewitt will wear you down. He just keeps going and going, fighting, scrapping, bashing from the baseline. Annoying, too, in his on-court histrionics. Not a craftsman, but a counter-puncher.

''There could be some amazing matches because they each play their own brand of tennis,'' said Brad Gilbert, Roddick's former coach. 'You get a combination of any of those four playing a match and you say, `Oh, I have to check that out.' ''

COMMON THREADS

All are younger than 25, have been the world's top-ranked player and have won at least one Grand Slam. They separated themselves from the pack last year and could do so again this year. The last time the same four men's players dominated the top four slots was 1983-85 when McEnroe, Lendl, Connors and Mats Wilander were a cut above.

''To keep tennis in the public consciousness, you need familiar names going at it,'' Patrick McEnroe said. ``People want to see Kansas and Kentucky. For a while the problem with men's tennis was too much depth.''

Rivalries are the lifeblood of tennis. Federer and Roddick recalled watching Becker vs. Stefan Edberg. Hewitt loved Connors vs. McEnroe. Rivalries are blossoming now among the four.

Take Safin's thriller (9-7 in the fifth set) against Federer at the Australian Open two months ago. Federer leads Safin 6-2 all-time, including a third-set, 20-18 win at the 2004 Masters Cup. Three of Hewitt's four losses in Grand Slams last year were to Federer, but Hewitt did come back from two sets down to beat Federer in a 2003 Davis Cup match. Federer's 8-1 lead over Roddick is deceiving; the sparks always fly between the two, including at Wimbledon in 2003 and '04.

''I don't know if in a rivalry you need one time the one wins, one time the other wins,'' Federer said. ``I just think you've got to play each other often in the big matches. The ones I played in the last Grand Slams I won were Marat, Andy and Lleyton. So that's definitely a good sign for the future.''

Federer is having the same effect on tennis that Tiger Woods had on golf. He's forcing his opponents to improve.

''Anyone who wants to be in the top group of tennis needs to adjust himself to Roger,'' said Safin, who referred to what he has adjusted. ``Being more professional, more consistent. Was not my case, but I'm getting there.

``Hewitt has improved a lot his serve, his forehand, his volley. Roddick improved his volleys. He's moving much better. He became much smarter. We are growing.''

GETTING BETTER

Cliff Drysdale thinks the quality of men's tennis declined when Sampras retired but that it has risen the past two years.

''I've never seen a more complete player -- and I'm going back to Pancho Gonzalez -- than Federer,'' said Drysdale, a TV analyst and former pro. ``Safin is the next most talented; he's only 10 percent lesser in stroke-making genius but needs to tame his demons. Andy won't be satisfied until he figures out a way to beat Federer, and that will require more variety and more strategy from him. And although Hewitt is limited, he can pounce on any lapse and turn the match around on you.''

What will it take to dethrone Federer? During the six consecutive years when Sampras was No. 1, there were five different No. 2s.

Todd Martin, who played against all four before he retired, said Federer -- who has won the last 16 finals he has appeared in -- can be the best ever ''because he doesn't shy away from being No. 1 like Pete did.'' But he's not indestructible.

''Roddick has the best serve in tennis, Safin often has the best return, and Hewitt is the most tenacious,'' Martin said. ``If they could each develop one more attacking facet, it will be really interesting.''

Roddick also has to shrug off the pressure of being ''the savior of American tennis,'' Gilbert added.

Each of the four is quick to compliment the others. Each used the same word to describe their generation: Exciting.

''This is what we've been waiting for,'' McEnroe said. ``Patrick Rafter, Gustavo Kuerten and Carlos Moya flirted but never established themselves. Now we've got four guys who understand the big picture. They know tennis needs them to keep pushing each other.

"What kind of shape am I in now? Well round is a shape." said Roddick with a laugh. "I had a very detailed retirement plan, and I feel like I've met every aspect of it: a lot of golf, a lot of carbs, a lot of fried food, and some booze, occasionally — I've been completely committed ... The results have shown."


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post #3 of 65 (permalink) Old 03-23-2005, 03:56 PM
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Re: The Nasdaq-100 Discussion Thread

You know, I'm quite fond of giving glib taglines to players myself, but Tennis "Nickname Factory"-X goes way too far. It gets in the way of any attempt to read the article seriously, although a couple of them are pretty good: "Nuclear" Wessels obviously shows that the Tennis-X staff think just as highly of Star Trek IV as I do, while Robby "Baby Courier" Ginepri is all the more hilarious because the only possible comparison between them is the colour of their hair. And "Korean net-rusher Hyung-Taik Lee"??? It just goes to show that giving your articles a snarky tone to make them stand out from the crowd doesn't necessarily make the journalism any more accurate.

The Wit and Wisdom of the Tennis Journalist, Indian Wells 2004

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I remember this one time when I went on a vacation on the Maldives. That was in the year 2001, I think. I went to this spa. I went to walk around with my girlfriend. I walk in, and we want to book a spa. This guy goes, "AHH, I remember you. You beat Sampras. I saw you on TV." That was like, really, how can you remember me? This guy has probably never been off his island and still knows me. I was a little bit shocked. Then I went to play tennis with him because he was actually the tennis teacher. It was nice.

Q. Were you naked at the time in the spa?

ROGER FEDERER: No. It was at the front desk. I didn't walk in naked.
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post #4 of 65 (permalink) Old 03-23-2005, 08:36 PM Thread Starter
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Re: The Nasdaq-100 Discussion Thread

I'm going to troll my own thread and post this terrific piece of garbage from Faux News. Enjoy.

Ten key questions with Grand Slams looming
by Dan Weil
Special to FOX(Faux)Sports.com

Tennis' top players are gathering in Key Biscayne outside Miami for the U.S.' second biggest tournament of the year. The Nasdaq-100 Open begins Wednesday, and marks the end of the spring hardcourt season. With the year's three remaining Grand Slam tournaments looming on the horizon, 10 major questions dominate the tennis world.

1. Can anyone stop Roger Federer?
In a word, no. As Pete Sampras said recently, the Swiss wunderkind's biggest opponent now is the record book. The 23-year-old Federer already has racked up four major victories and is on course to challenge Sampras' record of 14. Federer is a genius shotmaker with no holes in his game. He moves as well as anyone in the sport and can hit any shot at any time. On top of that, he makes it look easy. Like Sampras, he barely seems to be working up a sweat. It's no wonder he's won 42 of 43 matches since the Olympics last year. If not for a narrow loss to Marat Safin at the Australian Open in January, Federer would be a serious threat to win the Grand Slam this year.

2. What's up with the Williams sisters?
Serena won the Australian Open for her first major victory since 2003. But she captured the crown more on guts and self-belief than the strength of her game. The 23-year-old has a good to chance to garner her fourth Nasdaq crown, but she isn't the dominant player she once was. Other players have caught up to her power. And while Serena is pre-occupied with acting and fashion design, others are working harder on their tennis. Serena hasn't made any improvements since dropping from No. 1 in 2003. Those points ring even truer with Venus. She really seemed to lose interest in tennis after Serena beat her in five consecutive major finals in 2002-2003. Look for the 24-year-old to continue her slow fade.

3. Can Marat Safin challenge Federer for No. 1?
Not likely. Safin's results since his amazing Australian Open win in January have been disappointing. Whenever the 25-year-old Russian has raised expectations for greatness with big wins, like the 2000 US Open, he has quickly succumbed to the pressure. He's likely to fizzle not only at the Nasdaq but perhaps the final three slams of the year too. Safin plays his best tennis at the beginning of the year and at the end, when the pressure is lightest.

4. What's going on with the Belgian Bashers?
Former No. 1 Kim Clijsters and former No. 1 Justine Henin-Hardenne are back on tour from injuries. The likable Clijsters just won the Pacific Lite Open in Indian Wells. But the 21-year-old has shown a propensity for losing big matches throughout her career. She dropped all three of the major finals in which she played — all of them to her compatriot Henin-Hardenne. It is Henin-Hardenne who seems headed for greatness if she can get over injuries, the latest one being to her knee. Henin-Hardenne is the most exciting woman player since Australia's Evonne Goolagong in the 1970s. The 22-year-old is a bit like a female version of Roger Federer. She was dominating the game until a virus took her out of action last year. And it's no wonder why. She can do it all, and does it with grace and style.

5. What's Andre Agassi's story?
After a couple impressive wins, he had to pull out of the Pacific Life Open last week with a toe injury. It's sad to say, but the 34-year-old Las Vegas native looks headed for retirement. Injuries are becoming a constant drumbeat for the man who has taken tennis fitness to a new level. And he appears to have lost a step. His eight major titles are quite an accomplishment, but don't expect a ninth.

6. How about those Russian women?
Three different Russians captured the last three majors last year, with Anastasia Myskina taking the French, Maria Sharapova winning Wimbledon and Svetlana Kuznetsova emerging victorious at the US Open. And the beautiful Elena Dementieva was runner-up at the French and US Open. Those players are here to stay, but perhaps Sharapova is a bit too busy chasing her $18 million in endorsements. She was destroyed 6-0, 6-0 by Lindsay Davenport in the Pacific Lite Open.

7. Can Andy Roddick get back to the top?
Probably not. The 22-year-old has the misfortune of coming into the prime of his career at the same time as Roger Federer. Roddick has a huge serve and forehand, great footspeed and feisty competitiveness. But his game is limited compared to Federer. If the Swiss Superman doesn't get injured, Roddick's 2003 US Open crown may be the only major title of his career.

8. Why is Lindsay Davenport the women's top-ranked player?
You can thank an arcane ranking system and a weak field for that. Davenport hasn't won a big match since the Australian Open in 2000. The good-natured 28-year-old has beautiful booming groundstrokes and a huge serve, but loses confidence in big moments. She was ready to retire last year until she went on a hot streak. This year may be it.

9. What can we expect from Lleyton Hewitt?
A lot of wins but no major titles. The tenacious Australian doesn't have enough game to challenge Federer — or Safin when the Russian is capable of coping with pressure. Hewitt, 24, does have Roddick's number, beating the American in six of their seven meetings. But unfortunately for Hewitt, the two are unlikely to meet in any major finals.

10. Where's Jennifer Capriati?
She's coming back from shoulder surgery at the Nasdaq, but sadly the 28-year-old's best days are behind her. She's unlikely to contend for any more major titles.

"What kind of shape am I in now? Well round is a shape." said Roddick with a laugh. "I had a very detailed retirement plan, and I feel like I've met every aspect of it: a lot of golf, a lot of carbs, a lot of fried food, and some booze, occasionally — I've been completely committed ... The results have shown."


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post #5 of 65 (permalink) Old 03-23-2005, 11:23 PM
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Re: The Nasdaq-100 Discussion Thread

I wish Carlos would do well.

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Re: The Nasdaq-100 Discussion Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sjengster
You know, I'm quite fond of giving glib taglines to players myself, but Tennis "Nickname Factory"-X goes way too far. It gets in the way of any attempt to read the article seriously, although a couple of them are pretty good: "Nuclear" Wessels obviously shows that the Tennis-X staff think just as highly of Star Trek IV as I do, while Robby "Baby Courier" Ginepri is all the more hilarious because the only possible comparison between them is the colour of their hair. And "Korean net-rusher Hyung-Taik Lee"??? It just goes to show that giving your articles a snarky tone to make them stand out from the crowd doesn't necessarily make the journalism any more accurate.
I stopped paying attention to them when I spotted Jeff "Baby Krajicek" Morrison.
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Re: The Nasdaq-100 Discussion Thread

I really think that Fernando "Hot Sauce" Verdasco has a good ring to it.

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Re: The Nasdaq-100 Discussion Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by liptea
I really think that Fernando "Hot Sauce" Verdasco has a good ring to it.
What better than:

Guillermo "The Wound" Coria.
Tim "The Dentist's Nightmare" Henman.
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Re: The Nasdaq-100 Discussion Thread

Marat vs. Irakli, two of my faves.....hmm i have given this some thought but i decided if Irakli would win he would lose next round to ROCK ON MARAT!

DAVID NALBANDIAN = THE BEST
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Re: The Nasdaq-100 Discussion Thread

C'mon,Tommy Haas~~~~
and any1 who knows the official site???????:P im stupid:Pcant find it


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Re: The Nasdaq-100 Discussion Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by tangerine_dream
I'm going to troll my own thread and post this terrific piece of garbage from Faux News. Enjoy.

Ten key questions with Grand Slams looming
by Dan Weil
Special to FOX(Faux)Sports.com

Tennis' top players are gathering in Key Biscayne outside Miami for the U.S.' second biggest tournament of the year. The Nasdaq-100 Open begins Wednesday, and marks the end of the spring hardcourt season. With the year's three remaining Grand Slam tournaments looming on the horizon, 10 major questions dominate the tennis world.

1. Can anyone stop Roger Federer?
In a word, no. As Pete Sampras said recently, the Swiss wunderkind's biggest opponent now is the record book. The 23-year-old Federer already has racked up four major victories and is on course to challenge Sampras' record of 14. Federer is a genius shotmaker with no holes in his game. He moves as well as anyone in the sport and can hit any shot at any time. On top of that, he makes it look easy. Like Sampras, he barely seems to be working up a sweat. It's no wonder he's won 42 of 43 matches since the Olympics last year. If not for a narrow loss to Marat Safin at the Australian Open in January, Federer would be a serious threat to win the Grand Slam this year.

2. What's up with the Williams sisters?
Serena won the Australian Open for her first major victory since 2003. But she captured the crown more on guts and self-belief than the strength of her game. The 23-year-old has a good to chance to garner her fourth Nasdaq crown, but she isn't the dominant player she once was. Other players have caught up to her power. And while Serena is pre-occupied with acting and fashion design, others are working harder on their tennis. Serena hasn't made any improvements since dropping from No. 1 in 2003. Those points ring even truer with Venus. She really seemed to lose interest in tennis after Serena beat her in five consecutive major finals in 2002-2003. Look for the 24-year-old to continue her slow fade.

3. Can Marat Safin challenge Federer for No. 1?
Not likely. Safin's results since his amazing Australian Open win in January have been disappointing. Whenever the 25-year-old Russian has raised expectations for greatness with big wins, like the 2000 US Open, he has quickly succumbed to the pressure. He's likely to fizzle not only at the Nasdaq but perhaps the final three slams of the year too. Safin plays his best tennis at the beginning of the year and at the end, when the pressure is lightest.

4. What's going on with the Belgian Bashers?
Former No. 1 Kim Clijsters and former No. 1 Justine Henin-Hardenne are back on tour from injuries. The likable Clijsters just won the Pacific Lite Open in Indian Wells. But the 21-year-old has shown a propensity for losing big matches throughout her career. She dropped all three of the major finals in which she played — all of them to her compatriot Henin-Hardenne. It is Henin-Hardenne who seems headed for greatness if she can get over injuries, the latest one being to her knee. Henin-Hardenne is the most exciting woman player since Australia's Evonne Goolagong in the 1970s. The 22-year-old is a bit like a female version of Roger Federer. She was dominating the game until a virus took her out of action last year. And it's no wonder why. She can do it all, and does it with grace and style.

5. What's Andre Agassi's story?
After a couple impressive wins, he had to pull out of the Pacific Life Open last week with a toe injury. It's sad to say, but the 34-year-old Las Vegas native looks headed for retirement. Injuries are becoming a constant drumbeat for the man who has taken tennis fitness to a new level. And he appears to have lost a step. His eight major titles are quite an accomplishment, but don't expect a ninth.

6. How about those Russian women?
Three different Russians captured the last three majors last year, with Anastasia Myskina taking the French, Maria Sharapova winning Wimbledon and Svetlana Kuznetsova emerging victorious at the US Open. And the beautiful Elena Dementieva was runner-up at the French and US Open. Those players are here to stay, but perhaps Sharapova is a bit too busy chasing her $18 million in endorsements. She was destroyed 6-0, 6-0 by Lindsay Davenport in the Pacific Lite Open.

7. Can Andy Roddick get back to the top?
Probably not. The 22-year-old has the misfortune of coming into the prime of his career at the same time as Roger Federer. Roddick has a huge serve and forehand, great footspeed and feisty competitiveness. But his game is limited compared to Federer. If the Swiss Superman doesn't get injured, Roddick's 2003 US Open crown may be the only major title of his career.

8. Why is Lindsay Davenport the women's top-ranked player?
You can thank an arcane ranking system and a weak field for that. Davenport hasn't won a big match since the Australian Open in 2000. The good-natured 28-year-old has beautiful booming groundstrokes and a huge serve, but loses confidence in big moments. She was ready to retire last year until she went on a hot streak. This year may be it.

9. What can we expect from Lleyton Hewitt?
A lot of wins but no major titles. The tenacious Australian doesn't have enough game to challenge Federer — or Safin when the Russian is capable of coping with pressure. Hewitt, 24, does have Roddick's number, beating the American in six of their seven meetings. But unfortunately for Hewitt, the two are unlikely to meet in any major finals.

10. Where's Jennifer Capriati?
She's coming back from shoulder surgery at the Nasdaq, but sadly the 28-year-old's best days are behind her. She's unlikely to contend for any more major titles.
I wrote him a nasty but intelligent email about that garbage he wrote. I've never liked anything he's written, really, but wow that took the cake.


Serena Williams
Martina Navratilova
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Andy Roddick | Roger Federer | Venus Williams | Lleyton Hewitt | Maria Sharapova | Justine Henin-Hardenne | Kim Clijsters


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post #12 of 65 (permalink) Old 03-24-2005, 06:31 AM
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Re: The Nasdaq-100 Discussion Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by -ernie-
Marat vs. Irakli, two of my faves.....hmm i have given this some thought but i decided if Irakli would win he would lose next round to ROCK ON MARAT!
Marat will also lose the next round though.

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post #13 of 65 (permalink) Old 03-24-2005, 12:25 PM
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Re: The Nasdaq-100 Discussion Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paialii
I wrote him a nasty but intelligent email about that garbage he wrote. I've never liked anything he's written, really, but wow that took the cake.
Could you please enlighten me on what parts are garbage?

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post #14 of 65 (permalink) Old 03-24-2005, 12:47 PM
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Re: The Nasdaq-100 Discussion Thread

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Could you please enlighten me on what parts are garbage?
yeah, nothing amazing... yawn

"I asked a bloke in the front row if he liked the serve-and-volley stuff," said Rafter. "He said he did but asked if he was going to get to see any rallies. 'Not today, mate,' I told him."
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post #15 of 65 (permalink) Old 03-24-2005, 02:55 PM Thread Starter
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Re: The Nasdaq-100 Discussion Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paialii
I wrote him a nasty but intelligent email about that garbage he wrote. I've never liked anything he's written, really, but wow that took the cake.
I knew you'd get a kick out of it. Faux News is a joke.

Some more stuff from the local papers:

NASDAQ-100 | Men to watch

•*Roger Federer, 23, Switzerland: No. 1 in the world, he has been nearly unbeatable since last year's U.S. Open. A joy to watch, he creates highlight shots as he floats across the court. Coached by Tony Roche. Won three Grand Slams last year, the first man to do that since Mats Wilander in 1988.

•*Marat Safin, 25, Russia: Currently No. 4, the mercurial Muscovite is a crowd-pleaser who also leads tennis in racket-abuse penalties. At 6-4, 200 pounds, he combines power and speed. Won his second Grand Slam title by beating Federer in the Australian Open semis and Hewitt in the final.

•*Andy Roddick, 22, U.S.: The part-time Boca Raton resident has the fastest serve in tennis and a game well-suited to the Key Biscayne courts, where he is defending champion. He finished No. 2 to Federer last year.

•*Ivan Ljubicic, 26, Croatia: Led Croatia's upset of the U.S. in recent Davis Cup tie by beating Agassi and Roddick. Carries a picture of countryman Goran Ivanisevic with his Wimbledon trophy in his pocket. Hot player has moved up to No. 13.

•*Rafael Nadal, 18, Spain: Up-and-comer got as high as No. 30 last year and is 17-4 with two titles so far this year. Lefty comes from same area (Mallorca) as Carlos Moya.

•*Andre Agassi, 34, U.S.: Miami loves him and he loves Miami, having won six times here. Constantly bugged about retirement, Steffi Graf's husband is still motivated, chasing a ninth Grand Slam title. Currently No. 9.

•*Guillermo Coria, 23, Argentina: Stuck with a heartbreaker last year here when he had to retire from the final against Roddick with back spasms (he later had kidney stones removed). Lost 2004 French Open final after getting leg cramps. Perhaps the quickest guy on tour, he's now No. 5.

•*Joachim Johansson, 22, Sweden: Beat Roddick in U.S. Open quarterfinals last year and his aces pushed Agassi to the brink in January's Australian Open. The 6-6 ''Pim-Pim'' has a huge serve. Dates Hewitt's sister. Currently No. 11.

•*Tim Henman, 30, Great Britain: It's a treat to savor one of the last serve-and-volley masters. Has improved his velocity after recovering from shoulder problems.

•*Gaston Gaudio, 27, Argentina: A bit of a surprise winner last spring at the French Open, Gaudio already has won two titles this year, though both came on clay.

-----------------------------------------

Argentinan a crowd pleaser
03-24-05

World No. 5 Guillermo Coria of Argentina, seeded fourth at the NASDAQ-100 Open, is always a crowd favorite on Key Biscayne.

Last year, Coria, suffering from back spasms, pulled out of the tournament during the final against Andy Roddick. But Wednesday, the opening day of NASDAQ, Coria said he felt "perfect.''

He opens his NASDAQ play Saturday.

''I feel 10 points out of 10,'' Coria said. "I've been working very hard and feel very good. Also, this tournament helps me a lot because I like it very much.

"Apart from the problem that I had -- I had little stones in my kidney -- I had good memories from the tournament, from what I did last year. There are more Latins here than in Latin America, in South America, so I feel good here.''

Coria, 23, was asked if he feels the system of tennis is better in Argentina now than when he was growing up. "There are no secrets. It's the hard work, the practice every day. That's what takes you up. Obviously, the good results of the Argentinian players in particular help the young players look at them and encourage them to get better. Hopefully, there will be more to come.''

----------------------------------------

How the Men fared so far:

Robby Ginepri d. Filippo Volandri 7-6 (4), 6-1.

Hyung-Taik Lee d. Thomas Enqvist 3-6, 6-4, 6-3. :retard:

David Ferrer d. Philipp Kohlschreiber 6-2, 7-6 (6)

Kevin Kim d. Luis Horna 6-4, 4-6, 7-6 (0). :retard:

Alberto Martin d. Agustin Calleri 3-6, 6-3, 7-6 (3).

Irakli Labadze d. Younes El Aynaoui 6-4, 1-6, 6-1.

Jose Acasuso d. Jurgen Melzer 6-4, 6-3.

Juan Carlos Ferrero d. Brendan Evans 6-2, 6-4.

Jonas Bjorkman d. Max Mirnyi 2-6, 6-4, 6-1. that's a match I would've liked to have seen

Greg Rusedski d. Andreas Seppi 4-6, 6-4, 6-4.

Rainer Schuettler d. Potito Starace 7-6 (4), 5-7, 7-6 (5). he won a match

Jarkko Nieminen d. Cyril Saulnier 6-2, 7-6 (4).

Fernando Verdasco d. Peter Wessels 6-4, 7-5.

James Blake d. Kenneth Carlsen 6-3, 6-2.

Gael Monfils d. Michael Llodra 3-6, 6-4, 6-3.

Igor Andreev d. Nicolas Almagro 7-6 (4), 2-6, 7-6 (12).

Today's schedule

Men's singles first round

Stadium - 11 a.m.: Tomas Zib (CZE) vs. Mardy Fish (USA); Christophe Rochus (BEL) vs. Mark Philippoussis (AUS) WC; 7 p.m.: Nicolas Lapentti (ECU) vs. Karol Beck (SVK). Crap, Mardy's playing my new favorite guy

Grandstand - 11 a.m.: Jean-Rene Lisnard (FRA) vs. Donald Young (USA) WC; Stefan Koubek (AUT) vs.Jeff Morrison (USA).

Court 1 - 10 a.m.: Juan Monaco (ARG) vs. Ivo Minar (CZE) LL; Gilles Muller (LUX) vs. Mariano Zabaleta (ARG); Arnaud Clement (FRA) vs. Tomas Berdych (CZE).

Court 2 - 10 a.m.: Ricardo Mello (BRA) vs. Santiago Ventura (ESP); Sargis Sargsian (ARM) vs. Julien Benneteau (FRA).

Court 3 - 10 a.m.: Ivo Karlovic (CRO) vs. Olivier Rochus (BEL); Jan Hernych (CZE) vs. Davide Sanguinetti (ITA) Q.

Court 6 - 10 a.m.: Bjorn Phau (GER) vs. Alex Calatrava (ESP); Antony Dupuis (FRA) vs. Victor Hanescu (ROM).

Court 7 - 10 a.m.: Lars Burgsmuller (GER) vs. Florian Mayer (GER); Paul-Henri Mathieu (FRA) vs. Michal Tabara (CZE).

"What kind of shape am I in now? Well round is a shape." said Roddick with a laugh. "I had a very detailed retirement plan, and I feel like I've met every aspect of it: a lot of golf, a lot of carbs, a lot of fried food, and some booze, occasionally — I've been completely committed ... The results have shown."


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